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1. Hello and thank you for agreeing to do this interview! Lets start of with you introducing yourself, tell us where your from?
Hi Aaron, thanks for inviting me here. I come from Rethymnon, a small town in Crete. I lived for 5 years in Thessaloniki, where I studied architecture and I got back again to my town 7 years before.
2. You use flash a lot in your work, can you remember the first time you used flash and why you chose and developed this technique?
In October of  2009 I was in Athens, walking and shooting photos with my friend Costas Papageorgiou. He convinced me to buy a flash and from then and on I started to use it with a cable. I think I use it to be able to create my own light and be somehow independent from the external natural light sources, which a lot of times are not the desired ones at any moment.

3. Seeing as the street environment is out of your control, how much would you say that capturing a powerful image is down to luck?
I think luck is important in street photography, but without endless hours of walking, it brings no result just by itself. One or two photos may be a result of luck, but a whole portfolio can be born only through persistent work.
4. Your style is very eerie with a dark undertone, do you think this goes down your own subconscious perception of reality?
I don’t know, maybe…

5. Looking at your photographs you favor the wide angle lenses, why do these lenses suit your style?
Now that I think of it, maybe architecture helped me get used only to wide angle lenses. But the reaI reason I insist is that I believe photos of people have to be as close as possible to be full of life. I am not a scientist to observe through telescopes, I want to be inside life. And only the wide angle lenses permit the photographer to be inside the human crowd.
6. You take candid street portraiture using off-camera flash close up to your subject, how do people react to being photographed this way?
Most of them don’t understand what’s happening. What I’ve seen up to now is that the closer I get the less people realize that they get photographed. I have received some aggressive reactions from time to time but these incidents are relatively very few.

7. Who are some of your influences and favourite photographers at the moment?
My favourite photographers are Weegee, M.Parr ,G.Winogrand, D.Arbus , A.Sander.
I also like contemporary photographers, some of them I have presented them in my blog:
http://dirtyharrry.blogspot.com/p/photographers.html
8. Why is photography important to you?
I always carry my camera with me and when I see something interesting I take a photo of it. In the future maybe the answer to this question will be more clear in my mind, now I’m not sure. The truth is that I don’t know if I will ever be sure about anything.

9. Greece is going through some pretty tough times right now, do you think it has transcended into your work somehow, is it something you think about?
I can’t tell if the crisis is easily visible in my photos, as I’m not much interested in documentary photography. But it’s inevitable for someone who lives here to be blind to the political decadence and social struggle. I don’t know if Greece wasn’t in crisis if was shooting differently, maybe yes, maybe no. I guess since I’m now out in the streets and I shoot photos of a specific environment, that my photos are an aspect of this specific environment. Photography speaks differently to everyone, I don’t know what conclusions may come out from my photos.
10. Where do you draw the line regarding digital manipulation on your personal work?
Working on the contrast and levels in the raw files is enough for me. I think the line that I don’t want to pass is to spend more time in front of a computer editing photos I took, instead of searching for new images.

11. Do you plan to exhibit or publish any of your work in print form?
I edited two venustreet books with photos of mine and many other photographers.
I had made an exhibition two years before and I have participated in a few group exhibitions. Exhibiting is nice, as you can see your photos printed (I’ve not seen not even the 1% of my photos printed, unfortunately I rarely print) but also needs money, time etc and I don’t know if this is exactly what I can do at the moment.
12. Can you remember why you first started to photograph?
I bought my first analog camera in 1997 in the university, it was a necessary tool for my studies and my work. The first years until 2008 I was shooting only buildings and urban spaces. The way I was shooting in these early photos was terrible I must say. Not the subjects themselves, as any subject is interesting, but the way I was shooting. I paid attention only to frame well, I didn’t care at all about the meaning of what I was shooting. In 2008 I bought a digital camera and started to shoot more. I saw some Magnum photos and understood that photography is not only framing. Eleven years of terrible photos is a long time. I have to try to repair this somehow. Inside the total garbage that I shoot, I may find some moments that I like and I won’t delete. And after some months or years I’ll see these images and they will probably say nothing to me any more. I think this is more or less this is the way it goes.

13. Whats the most important thing you’ve learned thats improved you’re photography the greatest?
What I try to do is shooting as much as I can and looking at other people’s work to see how how they understand the world around them. These two things I think are very important for me, it’s a kind of dialog between my thoughts and other people’s thoughts.
14. Could you name one of your favorite photographs and explain what makes it so special?

Here’s a discussion about this photo :  
http://www.flickr.com/groups/onthestreet/discuss/72157621917523497/page127/#comment72157626483173946
15. Finally is there anything else you would like to add or promote?
Hmm… I think this world we live in has to collapse and rise again differently.
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Hello and thank you for agreeing to do this interview! Lets start of with you introducing yourself, tell us where your from?

Hi Aaron, thanks for inviting me here. I come from Rethymnon, a small town in Crete. I lived for 5 years in Thessaloniki, where I studied architecture and I got back again to my town 7 years before.

2. You use flash a lot in your work, can you remember the first time you used flash and why you chose and developed this technique?

In October of  2009 I was in Athens, walking and shooting photos with my friend Costas Papageorgiou. He convinced me to buy a flash and from then and on I started to use it with a cable. I think I use it to be able to create my own light and be somehow independent from the external natural light sources, which a lot of times are not the desired ones at any moment.

3. Seeing as the street environment is out of your control, how much would you say that capturing a powerful image is down to luck?

I think luck is important in street photography, but without endless hours of walking, it brings no result just by itself. One or two photos may be a result of luck, but a whole portfolio can be born only through persistent work.

4. Your style is very eerie with a dark undertone, do you think this goes down your own subconscious perception of reality?

I don’t know, maybe…

5. Looking at your photographs you favor the wide angle lenses, why do these lenses suit your style?

Now that I think of it, maybe architecture helped me get used only to wide angle lenses. But the reaI reason I insist is that I believe photos of people have to be as close as possible to be full of life. I am not a scientist to observe through telescopes, I want to be inside life. And only the wide angle lenses permit the photographer to be inside the human crowd.

6. You take candid street portraiture using off-camera flash close up to your subject, how do people react to being photographed this way?

Most of them don’t understand what’s happening. What I’ve seen up to now is that the closer I get the less people realize that they get photographed. I have received some aggressive reactions from time to time but these incidents are relatively very few.

7. Who are some of your influences and favourite photographers at the moment?

My favourite photographers are Weegee, M.Parr ,G.Winogrand, D.Arbus , A.Sander.

I also like contemporary photographers, some of them I have presented them in my blog:

http://dirtyharrry.blogspot.com/p/photographers.html

8. Why is photography important to you?

I always carry my camera with me and when I see something interesting I take a photo of it. In the future maybe the answer to this question will be more clear in my mind, now I’m not sure. The truth is that I don’t know if I will ever be sure about anything.

9. Greece is going through some pretty tough times right now, do you think it has transcended into your work somehow, is it something you think about?

I can’t tell if the crisis is easily visible in my photos, as I’m not much interested in documentary photography. But it’s inevitable for someone who lives here to be blind to the political decadence and social struggle. I don’t know if Greece wasn’t in crisis if was shooting differently, maybe yes, maybe no. I guess since I’m now out in the streets and I shoot photos of a specific environment, that my photos are an aspect of this specific environment. Photography speaks differently to everyone, I don’t know what conclusions may come out from my photos.

10. Where do you draw the line regarding digital manipulation on your personal work?

Working on the contrast and levels in the raw files is enough for me. I think the line that I don’t want to pass is to spend more time in front of a computer editing photos I took, instead of searching for new images.

11. Do you plan to exhibit or publish any of your work in print form?

I edited two venustreet books with photos of mine and many other photographers.

I had made an exhibition two years before and I have participated in a few group exhibitions. Exhibiting is nice, as you can see your photos printed (I’ve not seen not even the 1% of my photos printed, unfortunately I rarely print) but also needs money, time etc and I don’t know if this is exactly what I can do at the moment.

12. Can you remember why you first started to photograph?

I bought my first analog camera in 1997 in the university, it was a necessary tool for my studies and my work. The first years until 2008 I was shooting only buildings and urban spaces. The way I was shooting in these early photos was terrible I must say. Not the subjects themselves, as any subject is interesting, but the way I was shooting. I paid attention only to frame well, I didn’t care at all about the meaning of what I was shooting. In 2008 I bought a digital camera and started to shoot more. I saw some Magnum photos and understood that photography is not only framing. Eleven years of terrible photos is a long time. I have to try to repair this somehow. Inside the total garbage that I shoot, I may find some moments that I like and I won’t delete. And after some months or years I’ll see these images and they will probably say nothing to me any more. I think this is more or less this is the way it goes.

13. Whats the most important thing you’ve learned thats improved you’re photography the greatest?

What I try to do is shooting as much as I can and looking at other people’s work to see how how they understand the world around them. These two things I think are very important for me, it’s a kind of dialog between my thoughts and other people’s thoughts.

14. Could you name one of your favorite photographs and explain what makes it so special?

Here’s a discussion about this photo :  

http://www.flickr.com/groups/onthestreet/discuss/72157621917523497/page127/#comment72157626483173946

15. Finally is there anything else you would like to add or promote?

Hmm… I think this world we live in has to collapse and rise again differently.

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

 1. Firstly thanks for agreeing to this interview. Could you introduce yourself and tell us where your currently working?
I’m Kramer O’Neill, and I live in Brooklyn, NY. Sometimes I take pictures.
2. Let’s start of with your new books, ‘Pictures of People and Things 1’ and ‘Till Human Voices’. What made you want to publish these two books?
Pictures of People and Things was a little book I put together for fun while making the more “serious” Till Human Voices, but what do you know? It ended up being printed first. Not a total surprise, I guess: Pictures was made quickly from a diverse pool of years of shooting; it’s about diptychs and little narrative arcs and graphic matches. I tried not to think too much, to leave it loose and see what happened. It benefits greatly from this spontaneous assembly. I like it; it’s like looking at someone else’s edit of my work. Till Human Voices, on the other hand, is a pristine, meditative, very focused book. And that takes a lot of thought and editing and re-editing.

3. How long have you been photographing for and why did you start in the first place?
I shot a lot as a teenager, but not much in my twenties. Then I started again around five years ago, but with a totally different idea of what photography was. I used to be very concerned with getting the technical parts right, and now I hardly think about that. It’s much more about the action of making things, the expressionistic aspect rather than “correct” documentation.
4. You state on your website that you went out and made photos during morning and evening at certain times of the day within certain months of the year. Why did you choose to work within these time constraints? 
That began with a corner I liked shooting during my lunch break when I had a job in midtown Manhattan. After a while, I realized I’d been making a little project there, where it’s always more or less the same shot, but all the players have changed. When I saw the Design Trust Photo Urbanism Fellowship was accepting applications, I figured I could expand this plan to other locations. Miraculously, they liked the idea.

5. Do you have any stories of people grabbing/ reacting to your camera because they didn’t like being photographed?
Nothing terrible. Occasionally someone will confront me, but I might say something like “I was trying to photograph you, but you missed the light. You see, the way it’s falling over here, you would have needed to be…” and they get bored and wander off. Often a smile will do, or a distracted look. Sometimes they’re just curious what I’m doing, not angry. I think I’m pretty quiet and unassuming in general, the kind of guy who would have made a good “little gray man” in CIA-speak. People just don’t notice me. That’s annoying when I’m in line at the bank, but good for street photography.
6. From your Flickr account I’ve gathered that you use both film and digital cameras. Could you tell us what cameras you currently use and what makes them ideal for what you do?
My go-to has long been a Leica M4-2 that I bought used and very beaten-up. I like that; it makes me less worried about carrying it out everywhere – any new damage I inflict upon it is completely unnoticeable. And of course, it’s small and quiet, mechanical with no meter. At times, it really does feel like an extension of my own mind and body. I also use a Nikonos V for in-water stuff. It’s a brilliantly-designed waterproof rangefinder. And I have an Olympus OM1 that I use occasionally; pre-Nikonos, I used it with a diving case in the water. And I use a 5D mkII for things requiring that kind of camera.

7. Amongst your influences you noted Trent Parke as an inspiration, which is evident in your current work. What did you like about Trents working style that inspired you to go out and shoot street in a surreal way?
When I first saw Parke’s work, I didn’t think of it as street photography. My knowledge of street at the time was pretty limited; I had long loved Robert Frank's The Americans, and I was vaguely aware that it fit the genre, but Parke’s seemed so outside of it, despite the fact that he was generally shooting within a very conservative concept of street photography (ie: literally on a street). So what was different? Nothing, but everything. His processing, obviously, but also the situations he found. Many of them weren’t about human interaction at all; they worked on some other level. A filmmaker I know uses the term “illuminating the mystery of life,” and that’s what Parke’s work does for me. There’s this little space between what we logically should do and what we actually do, where we should be and where we are, the inexplicable mental or divine divergence that makes us human. That gulf is the mystery. That’s the space I want to photograph.
8. Your underwater work is truly breathtaking, why did you dive into underwater photography?
Looking back on my photography over the last five years, I can actually see myself edging closer and closer to the water. One summer of sporadic employment, I would take the subway out to Brighton Beach/Coney Island and just spend the days walking up and down the beach, photographing anything that caught my eye. But after a while that wasn’t enough. At a certain point, I was running out into the waves at Rockaway Beach, photographing bodysurfers and then jumping as high as possible when the wave crashed over me, camera overhead. And I thought: “wait, this is ridiculous. Time to get the necessary equipment and actually get in there.”

9. What motivates you to go out and document everyday life on the street?
It’s essential to my ability to cope with things I don’t understand, and there’s a whole lot I don’t understand. Some people jog, some do yoga, I photograph. (Actually, I like yoga too.) It’s not that I need to photograph, it’s that I can’t not photograph. 
10. Most of your pictures contain a high contrast, high energy aura about them. Would you say theirs more meaning to your pictures than first glance? 
I sure hope so. An easy critique of my work might be that it’s “purely aesthetics,” but aesthetics are photography. It’s not just that Garry Winogrand happened to find compelling scenes – they also looked interesting, because of light and angle and lens choice. Form and function are not separable. Great work does something specific to its genre that can’t be properly articulated in any other art form. I love good writing on photography or film or painting, but the best photos or films or paintings can’t be fully explained by writing, they can only be explained by themselves. 

11. Your work was put on show at the Atlantic Avenue Subway Station after being awarded the fifth photo Urbanism fellowship Award for your project ‘Same Time Every Day’. Did you have a chance to go down and watch peoples reactions to the work and what kind of feedback did you get from the public and people seeing it for the first time?
I’ve been there a few times, but oddly, I haven’t felt compelled to spend a long time there. I lived with these images for so long, trying to get people interested, it’s hard to stay excited about things you look at every day for years – I’m always hoping the next thing I shoot will be better. But it’s definitely fun to walk by the lightboxes, in that nobody knows who I am, so I’ve heard comments that ran the gamut: “Oh, that’s nice” to “Ugh, I don’t get this at all, why do they put up this crap?!” The fun part of it is that this isn’t a gallery, it doesn’t have the quotes around it telling people they have to appreciate it in a specific way (or appreciate it at all).
12. Your pictures are arranged into sets, almost like miniature stories. Did you consciously go out to make photos to fit into a story or was it the other way around?
Some of it is planned, some of it is about editing. I’ve done a lot of work in film editing, and have a decent sense of how to match images graphically and narratively. Often, I’ll notice I’m making a self-contained “story” midway through making it. It’s not necessarily conscious up to that point.

13. What countries most intrigue you to visit and document other than the USA, if any?
I tend to get really excited about places when I’m applying to artist residencies; there are stories to be found everywhere. Lately I’ve been putting together an application for a program in Finland, and that eastern-yet-not-Eastern Bloc concept has been fascinating me. (Note that I have yet to get any residencies, so we’ll see what I’m obsessed with next month.) I would definitely like to spend time in eastern Europe, North Africa, Australia, Latin America…have I covered everything yet? I also spend a lot of time in France for personal reasons, although the personal and the photographic are inextricably linked for me. I’m planning to move there in the next year.
14. Where do you see you and your work going in the near future?
I wish I knew, but that’s the adventure.

15. Finally, is their anything else you’d like to add or promote?
I already talked up the books, but I’ll gladly mention them again. I’m learning that self-publishing involves massive amounts of self-promotion. Which is quite a different thing from, you know, taking pictures.
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

 1. Firstly thanks for agreeing to this interview. Could you introduce yourself and tell us where your currently working?

I’m Kramer O’Neill, and I live in Brooklyn, NY. Sometimes I take pictures.

2. Let’s start of with your new books, ‘Pictures of People and Things 1’ and ‘Till Human Voices’. What made you want to publish these two books?

Pictures of People and Things was a little book I put together for fun while making the more “serious” Till Human Voices, but what do you know? It ended up being printed first. Not a total surprise, I guess: Pictures was made quickly from a diverse pool of years of shooting; it’s about diptychs and little narrative arcs and graphic matches. I tried not to think too much, to leave it loose and see what happened. It benefits greatly from this spontaneous assembly. I like it; it’s like looking at someone else’s edit of my work. Till Human Voices, on the other hand, is a pristine, meditative, very focused book. And that takes a lot of thought and editing and re-editing.


3. How long have you been photographing for and why did you start in the first place?

I shot a lot as a teenager, but not much in my twenties. Then I started again around five years ago, but with a totally different idea of what photography was. I used to be very concerned with getting the technical parts right, and now I hardly think about that. It’s much more about the action of making things, the expressionistic aspect rather than “correct” documentation.

4. You state on your website that you went out and made photos during morning and evening at certain times of the day within certain months of the year. Why did you choose to work within these time constraints? 

That began with a corner I liked shooting during my lunch break when I had a job in midtown Manhattan. After a while, I realized I’d been making a little project there, where it’s always more or less the same shot, but all the players have changed. When I saw the Design Trust Photo Urbanism Fellowship was accepting applications, I figured I could expand this plan to other locations. Miraculously, they liked the idea.


5. Do you have any stories of people grabbing/ reacting to your camera because they didn’t like being photographed?

Nothing terrible. Occasionally someone will confront me, but I might say something like “I was trying to photograph you, but you missed the light. You see, the way it’s falling over here, you would have needed to be…” and they get bored and wander off. Often a smile will do, or a distracted look. Sometimes they’re just curious what I’m doing, not angry. I think I’m pretty quiet and unassuming in general, the kind of guy who would have made a good “little gray man” in CIA-speak. People just don’t notice me. That’s annoying when I’m in line at the bank, but good for street photography.

6. From your Flickr account I’ve gathered that you use both film and digital cameras. Could you tell us what cameras you currently use and what makes them ideal for what you do?

My go-to has long been a Leica M4-2 that I bought used and very beaten-up. I like that; it makes me less worried about carrying it out everywhere – any new damage I inflict upon it is completely unnoticeable. And of course, it’s small and quiet, mechanical with no meter. At times, it really does feel like an extension of my own mind and body. I also use a Nikonos V for in-water stuff. It’s a brilliantly-designed waterproof rangefinder. And I have an Olympus OM1 that I use occasionally; pre-Nikonos, I used it with a diving case in the water. And I use a 5D mkII for things requiring that kind of camera.


7. Amongst your influences you noted Trent Parke as an inspiration, which is evident in your current work. What did you like about Trents working style that inspired you to go out and shoot street in a surreal way?

When I first saw Parke’s work, I didn’t think of it as street photography. My knowledge of street at the time was pretty limited; I had long loved Robert Frank's The Americans, and I was vaguely aware that it fit the genre, but Parke’s seemed so outside of it, despite the fact that he was generally shooting within a very conservative concept of street photography (ie: literally on a street). So what was different? Nothing, but everything. His processing, obviously, but also the situations he found. Many of them weren’t about human interaction at all; they worked on some other level. A filmmaker I know uses the term “illuminating the mystery of life,” and that’s what Parke’s work does for me. There’s this little space between what we logically should do and what we actually do, where we should be and where we are, the inexplicable mental or divine divergence that makes us human. That gulf is the mystery. That’s the space I want to photograph.

8. Your underwater work is truly breathtaking, why did you dive into underwater photography?

Looking back on my photography over the last five years, I can actually see myself edging closer and closer to the water. One summer of sporadic employment, I would take the subway out to Brighton Beach/Coney Island and just spend the days walking up and down the beach, photographing anything that caught my eye. But after a while that wasn’t enough. At a certain point, I was running out into the waves at Rockaway Beach, photographing bodysurfers and then jumping as high as possible when the wave crashed over me, camera overhead. And I thought: “wait, this is ridiculous. Time to get the necessary equipment and actually get in there.”


9. What motivates you to go out and document everyday life on the street?

It’s essential to my ability to cope with things I don’t understand, and there’s a whole lot I don’t understand. Some people jog, some do yoga, I photograph. (Actually, I like yoga too.) It’s not that I need to photograph, it’s that I can’t not photograph. 

10. Most of your pictures contain a high contrast, high energy aura about them. Would you say theirs more meaning to your pictures than first glance? 

I sure hope so. An easy critique of my work might be that it’s “purely aesthetics,” but aesthetics are photography. It’s not just that Garry Winogrand happened to find compelling scenes – they also looked interesting, because of light and angle and lens choice. Form and function are not separable. Great work does something specific to its genre that can’t be properly articulated in any other art form. I love good writing on photography or film or painting, but the best photos or films or paintings can’t be fully explained by writing, they can only be explained by themselves. 


11. Your work was put on show at the Atlantic Avenue Subway Station after being awarded the fifth photo Urbanism fellowship Award for your project ‘Same Time Every Day’. Did you have a chance to go down and watch peoples reactions to the work and what kind of feedback did you get from the public and people seeing it for the first time?

I’ve been there a few times, but oddly, I haven’t felt compelled to spend a long time there. I lived with these images for so long, trying to get people interested, it’s hard to stay excited about things you look at every day for years – I’m always hoping the next thing I shoot will be better. But it’s definitely fun to walk by the lightboxes, in that nobody knows who I am, so I’ve heard comments that ran the gamut: “Oh, that’s nice” to “Ugh, I don’t get this at all, why do they put up this crap?!” The fun part of it is that this isn’t a gallery, it doesn’t have the quotes around it telling people they have to appreciate it in a specific way (or appreciate it at all).

12. Your pictures are arranged into sets, almost like miniature stories. Did you consciously go out to make photos to fit into a story or was it the other way around?

Some of it is planned, some of it is about editing. I’ve done a lot of work in film editing, and have a decent sense of how to match images graphically and narratively. Often, I’ll notice I’m making a self-contained “story” midway through making it. It’s not necessarily conscious up to that point.


13. What countries most intrigue you to visit and document other than the USA, if any?

I tend to get really excited about places when I’m applying to artist residencies; there are stories to be found everywhere. Lately I’ve been putting together an application for a program in Finland, and that eastern-yet-not-Eastern Bloc concept has been fascinating me. (Note that I have yet to get any residencies, so we’ll see what I’m obsessed with next month.) I would definitely like to spend time in eastern Europe, North Africa, Australia, Latin America…have I covered everything yet? I also spend a lot of time in France for personal reasons, although the personal and the photographic are inextricably linked for me. I’m planning to move there in the next year.

14. Where do you see you and your work going in the near future?

I wish I knew, but that’s the adventure.


15. Finally, is their anything else you’d like to add or promote?

I already talked up the books, but I’ll gladly mention them again. I’m learning that self-publishing involves massive amounts of self-promotion. Which is quite a different thing from, you know, taking pictures.

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Hello, could you introduce yourself and tell us where your from?
Hi Aaron, I am David R. Cornejo, I was born in Mexico in 1984. I like to work with sound and all kinds of visual arts such as drawing, design, photography, and video amongst others. I currently live in downtown Guadalajara (Mexico).

2. Tell us a bit about the culture of Mexico, what kind of experiences could a traveller expect to find upon arriving at a town far away from the main tourist paths?
As soon as you get off the plane, you should head downtown. There, you can find a lot of cool places. For instance a local market where you can find fruit, food, traditional candies (many of them covered in chili), folk crafts and costumes, music, sometimes even different animals. You can also find colonial buildings most in baroque and churriqueresque styles. Haunted places (alleys, stores, houses, parks), popular legends, and cemeteries show a different side of our culture, since death is an important part of it. One of our biggest holidays, is “Día de Muertos” (The Day of the Dead) where people gather in cemeteries, build altars where they leave their deceased friends and relatives all what they liked when they were alive: tequila, cigarettes, food, and decorate them with flowers, photos, and candles as a way to remember the dead. Legend says they come back in spirit to drink, smoke, and eat, you know, remember how much fun Earth was.

3. What inspires you day to day to make art?
Most inspiration for my work comes from my absurd obsession with the occult, you know, the knowledge of the paranormal, the unexplained. That’s the most inspiring theme I have found. It never ends. I’m also really into all the kind of things I liked as a child, toys, cartoons, movies, all that takes you back to when you were only just discovering the world around you.
4. What was the inspiration behind the “Hairywords chair”?
I kept thinking how words probably create the most reproduced sound in our world (since there’s so many of us and we all speak), and how when someone writes them down they take them and give them the capacity to remain for a much longer time than when they are only spoken. 
The Hairywords Chair as well as the other installations made with this technique came basically from that idea. I painted the chair in 3 different sessions throughout a long period of time, in which I wrote memories that I recalled thru words and bits and pieces of what I heard at the moment. This created a kind of subconscious cypher and makes each person that sees it able to read a different part of it.

5. I sense a psychedelic/ geometric inspired feeling in your work, is finding order in all the chaos something you try to portray in your work?
Definitely. I am very influenced by the whole psychedelic philosophies from the 60’s and its consequences in art; the bright colorful kaleidoscopic collages. On the other hand, I feel very uncomfortable with empty spaces so that’s where the chaotic element comes from, its a sort of a “Horror vacui” thing of mine.
6. You exhibited your work through a solo exhibition, what made you want to exhibit your work to the public and how was the exhibition received?
A friend of mine invited me to make an intervention in a big black room of his concept store and boutique. I liked the idea of experimenting with Hairy Words on a bigger scale than what I’m used to and to use the walls as well as the roof. I also exhibited a series of paintings and installations with a violent and absurd childish tendency. A lot of people came, and you know, they seem to have enjoyed it.

7. You use Tumblr as a means of putting your work out their to the world, how has the internet and social networking helped you progress with your art?
My blog in Tumblr is a sort of diary of my work, a therapy that helps keep myself active and it turned out to be a very good way to meet very different people that do so many interesting things. It helps create a virtual community that I wouldn’t be able to find otherwise.

8. You’ve created visual as well as sound works, what do you enjoy about using different mediums?
I kind of rotate from one activity to another thru the year as I feel necessary. I’m very comfortable going back and forth for some reason. That’s probably why I like music, painting, and video, or anything else just the same. 
9. We both collaborated on a video about a year ago called ‘The Dream’, the response to the video was very positive. People seem to enjoy it when two well fitting artists get together and create something. What do you enjoy about collaboration?
I really enjoy how different one’s work can turn out to be when collaborating with someone else, you know, how both works can be greatly complemented by one another. I have had the opportunity to make a few collaborations thanks to the way we interact nowadays. Internet has been a great tool and it makes it so much easier to work with different people abroad. 

10. Who are the characters/ figures portrayed in a lot of your work?
I guess the characters I create are the ones I would have enjoyed to see or have as a child. My father is a publicist and my mother is a painter so I grew up surrounded by colourful and playful drawings, paintings, books that play a very big part of what I do now.  
11. Are the sounds you create an extension of your visual work, or are they something your experimenting with?
I think it might be the other way around since I started doing music and experimenting with sound even before I did with drawing, at least in a more professional level but they are definitely part of the same thing.

12. You use graph paper a lot in your works, why do you choose this over a blank canvas?
I actually use almost any surface, including graph paper. I try to find different materials as well as dirty or old things for me to paint on. I avoid blank canvases at all costs, I find them rather annoying. Such a white clean surface that’s actually meant to serve a sole purpose can be somewhat limiting and doesn’t really let me work freely.
13. Mexico has a reputation for being quite violent, would you say this is true?
Mexico has been going thru a lot this last decade, it has grown violent in some areas, mainly in the most important frontier cities. As I said before, I live in Guadalajara, and I’ve never had any kind of trouble or bad experience. 

14. Your work is very raw, in the sense that it has a sketchy feel about it. Do you work fast allowing yourself to work parallel to what your brain’s thinking in the moment?
Yes, I actually never think beforehand what I’m about to paint, I don’t prepare anything before I do so either. Everything develops right that moment and shapes itself little by little until I’m comfortable with the final result.

15. Are their any future projects you’d like to promote?
Right now I’m mostly focused in music, I have a new project called “Play Tonto”, where I use low fidelity recordings techniques to create acid, noisy melodies focusing mainly on coming up with an analog sound when digital media prevails. My first album is already finished, it’s probably going to be released later this year on audio cassette. I am also working on a 7” vinyl single. You can check it out at soundcloud.com/playtonto. On the other hand there’s “The Horse We Want To Hang” (THWWTH), a studio where we plan to include different fields such as design, clothing, music, print, film, books, etc., incorporating interesting artists from all around the world.

16. Is their anything else you’d like to add?
Well I’d like to thank you for this interview, it was really fun! I had a great time!
Name: David R. CornejoFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pillowkite/Website: http://davidrcornejo.tumblr.com/Play Tonto: http://soundcloud.com/playtonto
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Hello, could you introduce yourself and tell us where your from?

Hi Aaron, I am David R. Cornejo, I was born in Mexico in 1984. I like to work with sound and all kinds of visual arts such as drawing, design, photography, and video amongst others. I currently live in downtown Guadalajara (Mexico).

2. Tell us a bit about the culture of Mexico, what kind of experiences could a traveller expect to find upon arriving at a town far away from the main tourist paths?

As soon as you get off the plane, you should head downtown. There, you can find a lot of cool places. For instance a local market where you can find fruit, food, traditional candies (many of them covered in chili), folk crafts and costumes, music, sometimes even different animals. You can also find colonial buildings most in baroque and churriqueresque styles. Haunted places (alleys, stores, houses, parks), popular legends, and cemeteries show a different side of our culture, since death is an important part of it. One of our biggest holidays, is “Día de Muertos” (The Day of the Dead) where people gather in cemeteries, build altars where they leave their deceased friends and relatives all what they liked when they were alive: tequila, cigarettes, food, and decorate them with flowers, photos, and candles as a way to remember the dead. Legend says they come back in spirit to drink, smoke, and eat, you know, remember how much fun Earth was.

3. What inspires you day to day to make art?

Most inspiration for my work comes from my absurd obsession with the occult, you know, the knowledge of the paranormal, the unexplained. That’s the most inspiring theme I have found. It never ends. I’m also really into all the kind of things I liked as a child, toys, cartoons, movies, all that takes you back to when you were only just discovering the world around you.

4. What was the inspiration behind the “Hairywords chair”?

I kept thinking how words probably create the most reproduced sound in our world (since there’s so many of us and we all speak), and how when someone writes them down they take them and give them the capacity to remain for a much longer time than when they are only spoken. 

The Hairywords Chair as well as the other installations made with this technique came basically from that idea. I painted the chair in 3 different sessions throughout a long period of time, in which I wrote memories that I recalled thru words and bits and pieces of what I heard at the moment. This created a kind of subconscious cypher and makes each person that sees it able to read a different part of it.

David R. Cornejo - Hairywords Ball Chair

5. I sense a psychedelic/ geometric inspired feeling in your work, is finding order in all the chaos something you try to portray in your work?

Definitely. I am very influenced by the whole psychedelic philosophies from the 60’s and its consequences in art; the bright colorful kaleidoscopic collages. On the other hand, I feel very uncomfortable with empty spaces so that’s where the chaotic element comes from, its a sort of a “Horror vacui” thing of mine.

6. You exhibited your work through a solo exhibition, what made you want to exhibit your work to the public and how was the exhibition received?

A friend of mine invited me to make an intervention in a big black room of his concept store and boutique. I liked the idea of experimenting with Hairy Words on a bigger scale than what I’m used to and to use the walls as well as the roof. I also exhibited a series of paintings and installations with a violent and absurd childish tendency. A lot of people came, and you know, they seem to have enjoyed it.

The Whole World Is Our Playground. (Intervention & Solo Exhibition at "La Kalandra")

7. You use Tumblr as a means of putting your work out their to the world, how has the internet and social networking helped you progress with your art?

My blog in Tumblr is a sort of diary of my work, a therapy that helps keep myself active and it turned out to be a very good way to meet very different people that do so many interesting things. It helps create a virtual community that I wouldn’t be able to find otherwise.

jezebel spirit, jezebel spirit, jezebel spirit, jezebel spirit

8. You’ve created visual as well as sound works, what do you enjoy about using different mediums?

I kind of rotate from one activity to another thru the year as I feel necessary. I’m very comfortable going back and forth for some reason. That’s probably why I like music, painting, and video, or anything else just the same. 

9. We both collaborated on a video about a year ago called ‘The Dream’, the response to the video was very positive. People seem to enjoy it when two well fitting artists get together and create something. What do you enjoy about collaboration?

I really enjoy how different one’s work can turn out to be when collaborating with someone else, you know, how both works can be greatly complemented by one another. I have had the opportunity to make a few collaborations thanks to the way we interact nowadays. Internet has been a great tool and it makes it so much easier to work with different people abroad. 

10. Who are the characters/ figures portrayed in a lot of your work?

I guess the characters I create are the ones I would have enjoyed to see or have as a child. My father is a publicist and my mother is a painter so I grew up surrounded by colourful and playful drawings, paintings, books that play a very big part of what I do now.  

11. Are the sounds you create an extension of your visual work, or are they something your experimenting with?

I think it might be the other way around since I started doing music and experimenting with sound even before I did with drawing, at least in a more professional level but they are definitely part of the same thing.

12. You use graph paper a lot in your works, why do you choose this over a blank canvas?

I actually use almost any surface, including graph paper. I try to find different materials as well as dirty or old things for me to paint on. I avoid blank canvases at all costs, I find them rather annoying. Such a white clean surface that’s actually meant to serve a sole purpose can be somewhat limiting and doesn’t really let me work freely.

13. Mexico has a reputation for being quite violent, would you say this is true?

Mexico has been going thru a lot this last decade, it has grown violent in some areas, mainly in the most important frontier cities. As I said before, I live in Guadalajara, and I’ve never had any kind of trouble or bad experience. 

14. Your work is very raw, in the sense that it has a sketchy feel about it. Do you work fast allowing yourself to work parallel to what your brain’s thinking in the moment?

Yes, I actually never think beforehand what I’m about to paint, I don’t prepare anything before I do so either. Everything develops right that moment and shapes itself little by little until I’m comfortable with the final result.

Self Prescription

15. Are their any future projects you’d like to promote?

Right now I’m mostly focused in music, I have a new project called “Play Tonto”, where I use low fidelity recordings techniques to create acid, noisy melodies focusing mainly on coming up with an analog sound when digital media prevails. My first album is already finished, it’s probably going to be released later this year on audio cassette. I am also working on a 7” vinyl single. You can check it out at soundcloud.com/playtonto. On the other hand there’s “The Horse We Want To Hang” (THWWTH), a studio where we plan to include different fields such as design, clothing, music, print, film, books, etc., incorporating interesting artists from all around the world.

16. Is their anything else you’d like to add?

Well I’d like to thank you for this interview, it was really fun! I had a great time!

Name: David R. Cornejo
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pillowkite/

Website: http://davidrcornejo.tumblr.com/
Play Tonto: http://soundcloud.com/playtonto

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Thanks for granting us this interview. First, let’s get into your new project. How did you guys first meet, and what about your relationship made you realize that you you two should work on tunes together? 
Doubleclick: We both lived in Brighton, but despite having a few friends in common, we didn’t actually cross paths until about ten years ago. When you both like Jungle, Cardiacs and tracks like Brandy’s “What About Us?”, you pretty much have to make an LP. I’m speaking from a position of limited experience, but it’s been 100% true in all cases in which I was personally involved. 
2. How did the name Two Fingers come about? 
Doubleclick: We went through a lot of potential names, using all the usual methods. At one point I got so desperate I even tried the “anagram of your last names” thing, but that doesn’t work so well when you’re called Tobin and Chapman. I know Two Fingers isn’t the greatest name in the world, but would you want to be part of an act called Phantom Cabin? Or Bacon Ham Pint? A Camp Thin Nob? Me neither. 
3. Were you guys shooting to work on an album together? 
Doubleclick: Yes, and more. We set out to make the LP, and then do production for other musicians. 
4. The majority of the album features vocals, including Sway atop 7 of the 12 tracks. Was that by design? How did you guys get Sway to contribute so much to the project? 
Amon: I cornered him at a festival in France and handed him a CD of our beats. He didn’t know it yet, but we’d already decided he was going to be the main vocalist on the record. 
5. How would you describe the Two Fingers sound? I saw in URB that you guys classify this as a Hip-Hop album. Do you think the buying public will?
Doubleclick: A lot of people think Hip-Hop is just a certain sound, that it’s an easily definable style of music, and that’s fine, but they don’t think the way we do. I think Hip-Hop is more than that (more than just music too, but that’s another discussion). It’s partly in the style, but it’s also in your way of thinking, the approach to what you do. I wouldn’t feel comfortable if this LP sounded like other people’s Hip-Hop anyway. We had an idea, and we couldn’t stifle it just to fit other people’s expectations.
Amon: Yo, andatzwatsup! 
Doubleclick: Quiet, you. 
6. What kind of equipment was used in creating the album? 
Amon: Some important pieces of hardware: Chandler compression and in particular the Manley EQ. 
7. I read a description of the album that described it as a “brutal and beautiful record that could only have grown out of the UK and the internationalism of those involved”. Do you have any thoughts on where that distinct hybrid sound of the UK will be going in the next 5 years or so? Do you think genres like dubstep could blow up on a larger scale? Doubleclick: Absolutely, and it’s overdue, particularly for the producers. The recent news about Snoop rhyming over Chase & Status’s “Eastern Jam” is a controversial subject, but I’m really excited to see where that can go. Back in ‘94, you had Goldie and 4-Hero remixing Scarface, Rob Playford & Foul Play remixing King Just… I was always expecting that the incredible production talent in DnB would end up doing full-on Hip-Hop work, and of course eventually we had the Adam F ”K.A.O.S.” project, but it never really went the way I expected. I see dubstep and DnB as extensions of the same thing, and I think there’s plenty that our producers can contribute directly to the US Hip-Hop and R&B scenes. As for whether dubstep itself could blow up, it certainly could and in many ways it already has. It’s for the producers in the scene to decide what happens next. 8. Word is Two Fingers will be performing live with Sway for a few dates in May (including a show at The Scala on May 13th). What can heads expect from this environment - will you guys stick to the tracks, or is there room for exploration and freestyling? Amon: We’ll be using decks combined with Native Instruments’ Traktor Scratch Pro, which allows us to give Sway free rein. He can go off on tangents in any way he likes, and we can fit the structure of the music around his performance. 9. Are there plans for any Two Fingers releases after this one? 
Amon: We’ve got another single (“That Girl”) coming in May which features the remix by Spor. We’re also planning a reworking of another LP track for another single release later in the year. 
10. Now, many heads would be upset if I didn’t ask - when are you going to churn out some more Jungle/DnB-esque tunes? Doubleclick: Anyone who loves DnB will hear straight away that there’s a strong thread of DnB running through the LP, especially in tracks like “Keman Rhythm”, but it’s very much blended into other styles. We have some tracks which didn’t make it onto the LP which are more explicitly DnB. There are so many tunes that just wouldn’t fit, and believe me it kills us hearing these things, thinking “if only we could have got this on there”. We have talked about doing an EP of DnB, though, so maybe we’ll get it out that way. We’ll be producing for other vocalists again soon, too, so maybe we can sneak a little something past them when they’re not looking. 11. Do you have a favorite tune from your back catalogue? Amon: There’s a track called “Slowly” I’ll always have a soft spot for. 12. Any chatter about an Amon Tobin solo album in the future? Amon: I’m going to start recording towards the end of this year. I’ve got this idea but it’s way too ambitious… it might have to remain a pipe dream, so I’ll keep it under my hat until I know I can do it for sure. Either way, I’ll continue to release one-off tunes regularly on my site (amontobin.com). I have to keep making tunes even if it’s not for a bigger project, otherwise I get a bit twitchy. More TF stuff on its way too, of course. 13. Do you get excited about new artists? Who is currently on your radar as someone who’s doing exciting work? Amon: I get inspired all the time by other producers. I want to keep learning and progress and I think the best way to do that is to listen with an open mind. I recently spent a bit of time at Eskmo’s studio, and he taught me a lot in a very short space of time. I had the same experience with the guys from Noisia a while back. These are all people who love what they do and are dedicated to their own progress in production. I find that motivating in itself. 14. Could we get a current top 10 from you? Doubleclick: The last few months have been a bit crazy, and we haven’t been able to buy anything or really listen to much music. I only get to listen to things on headphones when I’m on my way out these days, so I’ll give you a top eleven of what’s on my iPod today instead: Bettye Swann - Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye Fatme Serhan - Ala Warag Il Foull Frank Black - History Song Gremlinz, Manifest & Verb - Lion Of Babylon Broken Note - Crux Lil Kim - Lighters Up (Marc Mac remix) Billy Bragg - Levi Stubbs’s Tears Raphael Saadiq - Still Ray Tim Smith - Bug From Heaven Trimbal - Taliban Brandy – Necessary 15. Do you have any shout outs or final thoughts? Doubleclick: Thanks again to Khoma for the LP and singles artwork. Thanks too to Pillsbury for inventing canned cinnamon rolls with icing. Got me through some difficult winters in Montreal. 
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Thanks for granting us this interview. First, let’s get into your new project. How did you guys first meet, and what about your relationship made you realize that you you two should work on tunes together? 

DoubleclickWe both lived in Brighton, but despite having a few friends in common, we didn’t actually cross paths until about ten years ago. When you both like Jungle, Cardiacs and tracks like Brandy’s “What About Us?”, you pretty much have to make an LP. I’m speaking from a position of limited experience, but it’s been 100% true in all cases in which I was personally involved. 

2. How did the name Two Fingers come about? 

DoubleclickWe went through a lot of potential names, using all the usual methods. At one point I got so desperate I even tried the “anagram of your last names” thing, but that doesn’t work so well when you’re called Tobin and Chapman. I know Two Fingers isn’t the greatest name in the world, but would you want to be part of an act called Phantom Cabin? Or Bacon Ham PintA Camp Thin Nob? Me neither. 

3. Were you guys shooting to work on an album together? 

Doubleclick: Yes, and more. We set out to make the LP, and then do production for other musicians. 

4. The majority of the album features vocals, including Sway atop 7 of the 12 tracks. Was that by design? How did you guys get Sway to contribute so much to the project? 

Amon: I cornered him at a festival in France and handed him a CD of our beats. He didn’t know it yet, but we’d already decided he was going to be the main vocalist on the record. 

5. How would you describe the Two Fingers sound? I saw in URB that you guys classify this as a Hip-Hop album. Do you think the buying public will?

Doubleclick: A lot of people think Hip-Hop is just a certain sound, that it’s an easily definable style of music, and that’s fine, but they don’t think the way we do. I think Hip-Hop is more than that (more than just music too, but that’s another discussion). It’s partly in the style, but it’s also in your way of thinking, the approach to what you do. I wouldn’t feel comfortable if this LP sounded like other people’s Hip-Hop anyway. We had an idea, and we couldn’t stifle it just to fit other people’s expectations.

Amon: Yo, andatzwatsup! 

Doubleclick: Quiet, you. 

6. What kind of equipment was used in creating the album? 

Amon: Some important pieces of hardware: Chandler compression and in particular the Manley EQ. 

7. I read a description of the album that described it as a “brutal and beautiful record that could only have grown out of the UK and the internationalism of those involved”. Do you have any thoughts on where that distinct hybrid sound of the UK will be going in the next 5 years or so? Do you think genres like dubstep could blow up on a larger scale? 

Doubleclick: Absolutely, and it’s overdue, particularly for the producers. The recent news about Snoop rhyming over Chase & Status’s “Eastern Jam” is a controversial subject, but I’m really excited to see where that can go. Back in ‘94, you had Goldie and 4-Hero remixing Scarface, Rob Playford & Foul Play remixing King Just… I was always expecting that the incredible production talent in DnB would end up doing full-on Hip-Hop work, and of course eventually we had the Adam F ”K.A.O.S.” project, but it never really went the way I expected. I see dubstep and DnB as extensions of the same thing, and I think there’s plenty that our producers can contribute directly to the US Hip-Hop and R&B scenes. As for whether dubstep itself could blow up, it certainly could and in many ways it already has. It’s for the producers in the scene to decide what happens next. 

8. Word is Two Fingers will be performing live with Sway for a few dates in May (including a show at The Scala on May 13th). What can heads expect from this environment - will you guys stick to the tracks, or is there room for exploration and freestyling? 

Amon: We’ll be using decks combined with Native Instruments’ Traktor Scratch Pro, which allows us to give Sway free rein. He can go off on tangents in any way he likes, and we can fit the structure of the music around his performance. 

9. Are there plans for any Two Fingers releases after this one? 


Amon: We’ve got another single (“That Girl”) coming in May which features the remix by Spor. We’re also planning a reworking of another LP track for another single release later in the year. 

10. Now, many heads would be upset if I didn’t ask - when are you going to churn out some more Jungle/DnB-esque tunes? 

Doubleclick: Anyone who loves DnB will hear straight away that there’s a strong thread of DnB running through the LP, especially in tracks like “Keman Rhythm”, but it’s very much blended into other styles. We have some tracks which didn’t make it onto the LP which are more explicitly DnB. There are so many tunes that just wouldn’t fit, and believe me it kills us hearing these things, thinking “if only we could have got this on there”. We have talked about doing an EP of DnB, though, so maybe we’ll get it out that way. We’ll be producing for other vocalists again soon, too, so maybe we can sneak a little something past them when they’re not looking. 

11. Do you have a favorite tune from your back catalogue? 

Amon: There’s a track called “Slowly” I’ll always have a soft spot for. 

12. Any chatter about an Amon Tobin solo album in the future? 

Amon: I’m going to start recording towards the end of this year. I’ve got this idea but it’s way too ambitious… it might have to remain a pipe dream, so I’ll keep it under my hat until I know I can do it for sure. Either way, I’ll continue to release one-off tunes regularly on my site (amontobin.com). I have to keep making tunes even if it’s not for a bigger project, otherwise I get a bit twitchy. More TF stuff on its way too, of course. 

13. Do you get excited about new artists? Who is currently on your radar as someone who’s doing exciting work? 

Amon: I get inspired all the time by other producers. I want to keep learning and progress and I think the best way to do that is to listen with an open mind. I recently spent a bit of time at Eskmo’s studio, and he taught me a lot in a very short space of time. I had the same experience with the guys from Noisia a while back. These are all people who love what they do and are dedicated to their own progress in production. I find that motivating in itself. 

14. Could we get a current top 10 from you? 

Doubleclick: The last few months have been a bit crazy, and we haven’t been able to buy anything or really listen to much music. I only get to listen to things on headphones when I’m on my way out these days, so I’ll give you a top eleven of what’s on my iPod today instead: 

Bettye Swann - Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye 
Fatme Serhan - Ala Warag Il Foull 
Frank Black - History Song 
Gremlinz, Manifest & Verb - Lion Of Babylon 
Broken Note - Crux 
Lil Kim - Lighters Up (Marc Mac remix) 
Billy Bragg - Levi Stubbs’s Tears 
Raphael Saadiq - Still Ray 
Tim Smith - Bug From Heaven 
Trimbal - Taliban 
Brandy – Necessary
 

15. Do you have any shout outs or final thoughts? 

Doubleclick: Thanks again to Khoma for the LP and singles artwork. Thanks too to Pillsbury for inventing canned cinnamon rolls with icing. Got me through some difficult winters in Montreal. 

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. So what are the Wilcox Sessions?
Dick Thompson: Live hybrid-music videos recorded in our living room.
2. Where about’s on planet Earth do you record the sessions?
Dick Thompson: Hollywood, USA.
3. Why did you want to start this project?
Dick Thompson: We are huge music fans. Our first date was supposed to be Interpol at the Troubador, but I slept on getting tickets so we saw The Neptunas at the Mint instead.  I had always wanted to make music videos, Beaver wrote music previews for Flavorpill in NY, SF, and LA. She made a number of mix tapes each year for our friends that always featured new music no one had ever heard of. Around 2006 we had an idea to curate a monthly music show at our homies Equator Books in Venice and I would “film the bands and put it up on the Internet.”  We never got our shit together though. Then in February of 2010 Equator Books was closing it’s doors for good we were filled with a lot of regret for all the things we said we wanted to do but never did.  Fifteen year olds Dead Henry were playing the closing night party (little kyle was an intern) and their youth and excitement brought an element of exuberance and hope to an overall melancholic night – that’s when the idea was re-born. We went out and bought a camera the next day and two weeks later we had shot our first session.




4. How did you (Dick and Beaver) meet?
Dick Thompson: We met on a four day party weekend in LA back in early 2000’s. Here is our wedding commercial from ’08.

5. How do you choose the bands you record? 
Dick Thompson: A co-worker of mine answered this for me once, “Whoever will say yes.”  When we did our first session we didn’t really know any bands personally. We asked Dead Henry to be the guinea pigs for our first session, little Kyle from the band worked at our friend’s bookstore, Equator Books. After that it kind of snowballed and it went from friends of friends to managers, labels, and publicists becoming involved. Now the general reaction is “How did you get them to play your living room.” Our friend and collaborator Douglas Caballero has been great for us. He was the producer and host of a daily music program for Current TV so he knew the landscape pretty well, he booked a lot of cool bands for us like Voxhaul Broadcast, The Greenhornes and Moby. Each situation is completely different really. Little Hurricane was the first band to contact us from our website, we met Brooks from The Growlers in a swimming pool in Palm Springs, The Neighbors went to high school with Dead Henry. We don’t really understand why people show up ourselves, but we love it that they do. The bottom line is we invest our own money and most of our free time into the videos, so that generally guides our decisions.
6. What prior work have you done in video?
Dick Thompson: I’ve been a filmmaker since my teens. I’ve done a few music videos in the past and bunch of short films and I make my living as an editor for a television network.
Porn Guide: The Film Maker’s Guide to Pornography: 

 Blow: A Public Service Announcement:




Dead Man Eating:
 



Bedroom Scene Music Video:




7. Some of the props used in the videos are extremely unique. Big vintage lights, ball pits, tin foil furniture!? Are you responsible for the props or do the bands bring them? 
Dick Thompson: We try to do something unique for each video, and props and lighting are an easy way to do that. We bought the Fortuny lamp at a designer garage sale for the sole purpose of being a prop for the sessions. I bought the kiddie pool in hopes that we would fill it with water, but Beaver put the kybosh on it so we filled it up with the balls instead. The foil was 100% The Growlers. We had already bought a fish tank and 2 fish bowls for their session when they showed up with a box full of space blankets. It took them at least an hour to set them up.  It’s amazing how creative and committed they are.




8. What inspired you to theme the Wilcox Sessions in your living room?
Dick Thompson: Both necessity and laziness. When we bought the loft I never thought we could afford to shoot another project.  You could say it was born out of a creative solution to a financial problem. Leverage what you have.
9. Is the ‘take your shoes off’ rule something that happens even when your not recording?
Dick Thompson: Absolutely. My dad used to greet his guests, “Take your shoes off and stay a while.” David from Voxhaul Broadcast still apologizes every time he sees us for forgetting.  Beaver sends an email out to each band before their session reminding them to wear snazzy socks along with a short questionnaire: 1) what’s your favorite food? 2) what’s your favorite booze (it’s usually whiskey btw).

10. What new artists are you eyeing up for future recordings?
Dick Thompson: Los Angeles is a hot bed of talent right now, there are so many great bands.   We like Foster The People, Superhumanoids, The Chain Gang of 1974, Shannon and The Clams. We only shoot on the weekends so sometimes we get lucky where a band is coming through town and has the night off, like with The Greenhornes. Whoever will say yes, that we dig, basically.
11. The quality of your recordings are very high, both visually and sonically. How do you achieve this level of quality time after time?
Dick Thompson: We have a great crew and most have been with us from the very beginning.  We shoot on multiple Canon 7ds or 5ds. The most we’ve had was seven, but we were pretty much tripping over each other all night. The secret recipe is four cameras with operators and one on lockdown. I also have a couple GOPRO HD HEROs which are good for timelapses of setup or tucked away in a drum kit or keyboard.  We usually have a small jib arm or doorway dolly and my favorite is the smoke machine. Our sound engineer Bruce Hall literally brings a truck of equipment over that you could pretty much record a legit album on. He usually uses at least 24-30 mics each individually tracked so there is a lot of flexibility in the mix for our sound producer Manoj Gopinath to get it right. We usually spend around 20 hours on the edit of each video too.  So even though we record live, we take a lot of liberties in post that make a big difference. The process is often drunken and ragtag but the results are professional. 

12. Most of the bands and artists you record are quite niche, is new music something your want to promote?
Dick Thompson: Absolutely. We love the discovery aspect of music. There’s an energy and excitement to up and coming bands that makes the laborious aspects of production more satisfying. Production is hard, physical work, and feeling like the hired help on a promotional stop makes everything seem heavier. New bands definitely take advantage of the free liquor cabinet more often than not, which usually makes everyone happier. 

13. What happens behind the scenes when the bands have gone home?
Dick Thompson: If the band wants to stay and party we certainly accommodate that.  Sometimes it’s very professional and we shake hands and that’s that. In the case of the Hanni El Khatib session we all stayed up late, then made a baby. 
14. Where does the name ‘Wilcox Sessions’ come from, is it a surname?
Dick Thompson: It’s named after the street we live on. My biggest regret is the ‘sessions’ moniker, since there are so many ‘sessions’ out there now. I like the ‘Dick and Beaver’ Music Show better.
15. If you could give one piece of random advise what would it be?
Dick Thompson: Stop talking about it and get off your ass and do something and good things will happen.
16. Is their anything you’d like to add?
Dick Thompson: Nope, think that’s it. Thanks for watching. 
 
Name: The Wilcox SessionsFacebook: http://www.facebook.com/wilcoxsessionsTwitter: http://twitter.com/wilcoxsessions/Website: http://wilcoxsessions.com/Contact: wilcoxsessions@gmail.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. So what are the Wilcox Sessions?

Dick Thompson: Live hybrid-music videos recorded in our living room.

2. Where about’s on planet Earth do you record the sessions?

Dick Thompson: Hollywood, USA.

3. Why did you want to start this project?

Dick Thompson: We are huge music fans. Our first date was supposed to be Interpol at the Troubador, but I slept on getting tickets so we saw The Neptunas at the Mint instead.  I had always wanted to make music videos, Beaver wrote music previews for Flavorpill in NY, SF, and LA. She made a number of mix tapes each year for our friends that always featured new music no one had ever heard of. Around 2006 we had an idea to curate a monthly music show at our homies Equator Books in Venice and I would “film the bands and put it up on the Internet.”  We never got our shit together though. Then in February of 2010 Equator Books was closing it’s doors for good we were filled with a lot of regret for all the things we said we wanted to do but never did.  Fifteen year olds Dead Henry were playing the closing night party (little kyle was an intern) and their youth and excitement brought an element of exuberance and hope to an overall melancholic night – that’s when the idea was re-born. We went out and bought a camera the next day and two weeks later we had shot our first session.

4. How did you (Dick and Beaver) meet?

Dick Thompson: We met on a four day party weekend in LA back in early 2000’s. Here is our wedding commercial from ’08.

5. How do you choose the bands you record? 

Dick Thompson: A co-worker of mine answered this for me once, “Whoever will say yes.”  When we did our first session we didn’t really know any bands personally. We asked Dead Henry to be the guinea pigs for our first session, little Kyle from the band worked at our friend’s bookstore, Equator Books. After that it kind of snowballed and it went from friends of friends to managers, labels, and publicists becoming involved. Now the general reaction is “How did you get them to play your living room.” Our friend and collaborator Douglas Caballero has been great for us. He was the producer and host of a daily music program for Current TV so he knew the landscape pretty well, he booked a lot of cool bands for us like Voxhaul Broadcast, The Greenhornes and Moby. Each situation is completely different really. Little Hurricane was the first band to contact us from our website, we met Brooks from The Growlers in a swimming pool in Palm Springs, The Neighbors went to high school with Dead Henry. We don’t really understand why people show up ourselves, but we love it that they do. The bottom line is we invest our own money and most of our free time into the videos, so that generally guides our decisions.

6. What prior work have you done in video?

Dick Thompson: I’ve been a filmmaker since my teens. I’ve done a few music videos in the past and bunch of short films and I make my living as an editor for a television network.

Porn Guide: The Film Maker’s Guide to Pornography: 

 Blow: A Public Service Announcement:

Dead Man Eating:

Bedroom Scene Music Video:

7. Some of the props used in the videos are extremely unique. Big vintage lights, ball pits, tin foil furniture!? Are you responsible for the props or do the bands bring them? 

Dick Thompson: We try to do something unique for each video, and props and lighting are an easy way to do that. We bought the Fortuny lamp at a designer garage sale for the sole purpose of being a prop for the sessions. I bought the kiddie pool in hopes that we would fill it with water, but Beaver put the kybosh on it so we filled it up with the balls instead. The foil was 100% The Growlers. We had already bought a fish tank and 2 fish bowls for their session when they showed up with a box full of space blankets. It took them at least an hour to set them up.  It’s amazing how creative and committed they are.

8. What inspired you to theme the Wilcox Sessions in your living room?

Dick Thompson: Both necessity and laziness. When we bought the loft I never thought we could afford to shoot another project.  You could say it was born out of a creative solution to a financial problem. Leverage what you have.

9. Is the ‘take your shoes off’ rule something that happens even when your not recording?

Dick Thompson: Absolutely. My dad used to greet his guests, “Take your shoes off and stay a while.” David from Voxhaul Broadcast still apologizes every time he sees us for forgetting.  Beaver sends an email out to each band before their session reminding them to wear snazzy socks along with a short questionnaire: 1) what’s your favorite food? 2) what’s your favorite booze (it’s usually whiskey btw).

56391_180463008630640_147363085273966_643831_1362423_o

10. What new artists are you eyeing up for future recordings?

Dick Thompson: Los Angeles is a hot bed of talent right now, there are so many great bands.   We like Foster The People, Superhumanoids, The Chain Gang of 1974, Shannon and The Clams. We only shoot on the weekends so sometimes we get lucky where a band is coming through town and has the night off, like with The Greenhornes. Whoever will say yes, that we dig, basically.

11. The quality of your recordings are very high, both visually and sonically. How do you achieve this level of quality time after time?

Dick Thompson: We have a great crew and most have been with us from the very beginning.  We shoot on multiple Canon 7ds or 5ds. The most we’ve had was seven, but we were pretty much tripping over each other all night. The secret recipe is four cameras with operators and one on lockdown. I also have a couple GOPRO HD HEROs which are good for timelapses of setup or tucked away in a drum kit or keyboard.  We usually have a small jib arm or doorway dolly and my favorite is the smoke machine. Our sound engineer Bruce Hall literally brings a truck of equipment over that you could pretty much record a legit album on. He usually uses at least 24-30 mics each individually tracked so there is a lot of flexibility in the mix for our sound producer Manoj Gopinath to get it right. We usually spend around 20 hours on the edit of each video too.  So even though we record live, we take a lot of liberties in post that make a big difference. The process is often drunken and ragtag but the results are professional.

40759_167453289931612_147363085273966_558749_8060884_n

12. Most of the bands and artists you record are quite niche, is new music something your want to promote?

Dick Thompson: Absolutely. We love the discovery aspect of music. There’s an energy and excitement to up and coming bands that makes the laborious aspects of production more satisfying. Production is hard, physical work, and feeling like the hired help on a promotional stop makes everything seem heavier. New bands definitely take advantage of the free liquor cabinet more often than not, which usually makes everyone happier. 

68695_167692946574313_147363085273966_560765_6961396_n

13. What happens behind the scenes when the bands have gone home?

Dick Thompson: If the band wants to stay and party we certainly accommodate that.  Sometimes it’s very professional and we shake hands and that’s that. In the case of the Hanni El Khatib session we all stayed up late, then made a baby. 

14. Where does the name ‘Wilcox Sessions’ come from, is it a surname?

Dick Thompson: It’s named after the street we live on. My biggest regret is the ‘sessions’ moniker, since there are so many ‘sessions’ out there now. I like the ‘Dick and Beaver’ Music Show better.

15. If you could give one piece of random advise what would it be?

Dick Thompson: Stop talking about it and get off your ass and do something and good things will happen.

16. Is their anything you’d like to add?

Dick Thompson: Nope, think that’s it. Thanks for watching. 

Name: The Wilcox Sessions
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wilcoxsessions
Twitter: http://twitter.com/wilcoxsessions/

Website: http://wilcoxsessions.com/
Contact: 
wilcoxsessions@gmail.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Hello, could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where your currently located?
Hello! My name is Jack Coleman and I currently live and work out of Newport Beach/Costa Mesa, California.
2. Have you always lived by the sea?
I grew up about 35 miles inland from the beach, but I was hooked on the sea at a young age and ended up moving to beach cities starting age 18, so I’ve lived by the sea for 19 years. WOH, im dating myself.




3. What is the surroundings and culture of California like for artists like yourself?
The surrounding are great, if you take away the greed and superficiality of Orange County it is a really amazing place to be a surfer. The weather is never overly uncomfortable, the water is relatively warm, and there are always waves to ride, and Mexico is just a car drive away. The culture is great as well, I collect culture when I travel and keep that stoke inside like a squirrel that collects nuts, nuts of stoke and life.
4. How do you go about producing and directing a music video?
listen to song, brainstorm, think of how to shoot it without using artificial light, think of film stock, can I pay for it myself? Gotta like the song, think about lighting again, buy the film with my last dollars to my name (expecting not to be paid for the expenses), put the date into motion, collect props, visualize scenes, listen to song again, and again, expect to do everything myself, stoked on any help I can get, think nice thoughts, get the shoot going, and of course- have fun.




5. How did you end up working and touring with the Growlers?
They played at my first photography show 4 years ago @ The Detroit Bar with The Japanese Motors led by the great Alex Knost. Guitarist Nolan Hall said he had some friends who would play the show for free and we were introduced that way, and the rest is history.
6. Is it usual for you to work on a video by yourself or do you work with other people?
I usually work alone and get help from the hands that are there, to many people around kinda sucks. 
7. Why do you still use film rather than digital methods for some of your videos?
I first started shooting with 35mm film growing up, so for me the results are worth the hell I sometimes go through. I remember watching projected family films at my uncles house, that is why I have always been drawn to the feel of motion film.




8. How hard is it now to get your exposed film, processed and then digitalised into a format to edit with?
It takes about 2 weeks if I really am on it unless I process the film myself. Its 3 processes that I go through: shooting, processing, and transferring. It can sometimes be frustrating losing film that was exposed wrong or loaded bad. But that anticipation of a final image is what drives me everyday. Getting back some nicely exposed film gives you such a feel of accomplishment and relief when you get it back.
9. Are their any techniques to get strange effects with 16mm film by processing it in different chemicals/ temperatures?
I have been developing my own BW lately and it is always a crap shoot. I use mostly feel and gut for alot of the process. Developing 100 foot rolls in buckets with all my temperatures and times mostly done in my head using intuition to know when its right, and I’m starting to get better at it. I mostly do it myself to save money to buy more film so I can shoot more film.




10. What has been one of your favourite videos to date/ and why?
My own, “What It Is” by The Growlers because it was all improved and just happened as the shoot went.
11. How does the sea and surfing fit into your life?
It is my life. 
12. Why did you first pick up a camera?
When I first started to travel at age 22, I used to use an olympus 35mm point n’ shoot, then I bought a 35mm SLR manual camera from a surfer for $15.

13. What interests you about taking photos?
Something for people to remember and inspire, an image can sometimes change a persons life. It is that powerful to me.
14. Do you strive for perfection or are the imperfections something that make something perfect?
I try to strive for imperfection, but making pictures can sometime be a really controlled atmosphere.
15. Your work has a retro feeling to it, are you someone that looks into the past for inspiration and aesthetics or do you look into the future for new technology or the latest thing etc?
I look to the past for most of my research, but I do believe that technology isnt a step backwards.




16. How did you get involved with Vestal?
Was a friend with couple of employees and eventually the marketing director and owner liked my stuff and felt it was time for more of a lifestyle, free-wheeling campaign, so they brought me aboard in 2009.
17. If you could give yourself a style, like a musical genre, what would you call it?
Surf Porn.
18. Do you own any analogue cameras?
Yah, I am currently using a Bell & Howell 16mm camera. I today described shooting with it like, “trying to build cabinets with a hand saw”. I also have a Cambo 4x5 which is my favorite camera.

19. What are your likes and dislikes of film vs digital?
I like that film is actually real, it is something you can touch and feel. Digital is millions of pixels that have no physicality until its put onto paper as a print (which usually doesnt happen). Film brings depth and substance - While digital flattens and takes away the human element.
20. Where is your favourite place to eat and whats on the menu?
My favorite place to eat is Gloria’s Mexican restaurant in Costa Mesa on 19th street. Has the best Fish tacos and Mexicano burritos, $6 and you’re stoked
21. Is their anything you’d like to add or promote which we haven’t talked about yet?
My website is www.jackcolemanphoto.com and i usually keep the blog pretty up to date with projects I’ve shot and how I shot them.




 22. Thanks for you time! Keep doinwadyoudodude!
Get outta whatdyado!
 
Name: Jack ColemanWebsite: www.jackcolemanphoto.com/Contact: jackcolemanphotography@gmail.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Hello, could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where your currently located?

Hello! My name is Jack Coleman and I currently live and work out of Newport Beach/Costa Mesa, California.

2. Have you always lived by the sea?

I grew up about 35 miles inland from the beach, but I was hooked on the sea at a young age and ended up moving to beach cities starting age 18, so I’ve lived by the sea for 19 years. WOH, im dating myself.

3. What is the surroundings and culture of California like for artists like yourself?

The surrounding are great, if you take away the greed and superficiality of Orange County it is a really amazing place to be a surfer. The weather is never overly uncomfortable, the water is relatively warm, and there are always waves to ride, and Mexico is just a car drive away. The culture is great as well, I collect culture when I travel and keep that stoke inside like a squirrel that collects nuts, nuts of stoke and life.

4. How do you go about producing and directing a music video?

listen to song, brainstorm, think of how to shoot it without using artificial light, think of film stock, can I pay for it myself? Gotta like the song, think about lighting again, buy the film with my last dollars to my name (expecting not to be paid for the expenses), put the date into motion, collect props, visualize scenes, listen to song again, and again, expect to do everything myself, stoked on any help I can get, think nice thoughts, get the shoot going, and of course- have fun.

5. How did you end up working and touring with the Growlers?

They played at my first photography show 4 years ago @ The Detroit Bar with The Japanese Motors led by the great Alex Knost. Guitarist Nolan Hall said he had some friends who would play the show for free and we were introduced that way, and the rest is history.

6. Is it usual for you to work on a video by yourself or do you work with other people?

I usually work alone and get help from the hands that are there, to many people around kinda sucks. 

7. Why do you still use film rather than digital methods for some of your videos?

I first started shooting with 35mm film growing up, so for me the results are worth the hell I sometimes go through. I remember watching projected family films at my uncles house, that is why I have always been drawn to the feel of motion film.

8. How hard is it now to get your exposed film, processed and then digitalised into a format to edit with?

It takes about 2 weeks if I really am on it unless I process the film myself. Its 3 processes that I go through: shooting, processing, and transferring. It can sometimes be frustrating losing film that was exposed wrong or loaded bad. But that anticipation of a final image is what drives me everyday. Getting back some nicely exposed film gives you such a feel of accomplishment and relief when you get it back.

9. Are their any techniques to get strange effects with 16mm film by processing it in different chemicals/ temperatures?

I have been developing my own BW lately and it is always a crap shoot. I use mostly feel and gut for alot of the process. Developing 100 foot rolls in buckets with all my temperatures and times mostly done in my head using intuition to know when its right, and I’m starting to get better at it. I mostly do it myself to save money to buy more film so I can shoot more film.

10. What has been one of your favourite videos to date/ and why?

My own, “What It Is” by The Growlers because it was all improved and just happened as the shoot went.

11. How does the sea and surfing fit into your life?

It is my life. 

12. Why did you first pick up a camera?

When I first started to travel at age 22, I used to use an olympus 35mm point n’ shoot, then I bought a 35mm SLR manual camera from a surfer for $15.

Jack Coleman

13. What interests you about taking photos?

Something for people to remember and inspire, an image can sometimes change a persons life. It is that powerful to me.

14. Do you strive for perfection or are the imperfections something that make something perfect?

I try to strive for imperfection, but making pictures can sometime be a really controlled atmosphere.

15. Your work has a retro feeling to it, are you someone that looks into the past for inspiration and aesthetics or do you look into the future for new technology or the latest thing etc?

I look to the past for most of my research, but I do believe that technology isnt a step backwards.

16. How did you get involved with Vestal?

Was a friend with couple of employees and eventually the marketing director and owner liked my stuff and felt it was time for more of a lifestyle, free-wheeling campaign, so they brought me aboard in 2009.

17. If you could give yourself a style, like a musical genre, what would you call it?

Surf Porn.

18. Do you own any analogue cameras?

Yah, I am currently using a Bell & Howell 16mm camera. I today described shooting with it like, “trying to build cabinets with a hand saw”. I also have a Cambo 4x5 which is my favorite camera.

Jack Coleman

19. What are your likes and dislikes of film vs digital?

I like that film is actually real, it is something you can touch and feel. Digital is millions of pixels that have no physicality until its put onto paper as a print (which usually doesnt happen). Film brings depth and substance - While digital flattens and takes away the human element.

20. Where is your favourite place to eat and whats on the menu?

My favorite place to eat is Gloria’s Mexican restaurant in Costa Mesa on 19th street. Has the best Fish tacos and Mexicano burritos, $6 and you’re stoked

21. Is their anything you’d like to add or promote which we haven’t talked about yet?

My website is www.jackcolemanphoto.com and i usually keep the blog pretty up to date with projects I’ve shot and how I shot them.

 22. Thanks for you time! Keep doinwadyoudodude!

Get outta whatdyado!

Name: Jack Coleman
Website: www.jackcolemanphoto.com/
Contact: 
jackcolemanphotography@gmail.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

Hi! Could you kindly introduce yourself?
Hello, my name is Marshall Foster and I was born and raised in Texas.  I currently live in Austin, and work in the music industry.
Where about’s did you grow up and how do you think it influenced you later as a photographer?
I grew up in a town just 30 minutes south of Austin, TX called San Marcos.  I believe that the places we grow up in have a great influence on us.  These places are where we begin to view and engage the world around us.  Growing up we, my twin Brother, Sister and I, all had to go to a Private Christian School for about 5 years.  Over those 5 years we learned all about the battle between good and evil and the contrast of light verses dark.  I think that lesson has always stayed with me.  Now, I’d say that I’m more spiritual than religious, but am still in awe of the contrast of light and dark, and I love to photograph crosses and other holy symbols when I can.  When I was a kid I really wanted to be an archaeologist and travel the world digging up bones and treasure.
What do you love about taking photographs?
I love photographing the fleeting moments of passion and emotion that are often too quick for the human eye to hold on to.  I always want to dig deeper into a realm where unscripted beauty lies alongside honest emotion.  This is why I enjoy shooting the world around us rather than doing photo shoots where shots are more contrived.  When people view my photos I hope they gain an emotional experience with each one.  To me, many of my photos beckon emotions such as confusion, sadness, happiness, fear or love.  I also write music, and the one thing that I love most about writing music is hearing people talk about the emotional connection they made with the song after hearing it.  I share this same idea with the photos I take.

What motivates you to keep pressing the shutter release button?
I can remember the exact moment that I fell in love with photography.  It was on July 28th, 2008., and we were in Venice Italy for work.  I asked my friend Todd Purifoy, who is a professional photographer, if I could borrow his camera to walk around with. He said yes, and kindly showed me how to basically use the camera. After my camera lesson, I then took of to explore the wondrous city. I was hooked from the first moment I looked through the viewfinder and snapped my first photo!  It was like a veil was lifted from my eyes. My mind seemed to summon beauty out from the shadows and lights. Lines and colors were overloading my senses but I couldn’t turn it off. The camera had forever changed the way I viewed the world. From then on I wanted to learn all I could about photography. I started reading books on photography, subscribing to photography magazines, and completing online tutorials on editing techniques. The more I learned, the more I experimented. In February of 2010 my grandfather gave me a couple of his old analogue cameras that he had used previously for many years.  At first, I didn’t really know what to do with them and actually thought about taking the old cameras to the camera store to see about selling them because I didn’t think I would ever use them.  (Later I would be grateful I didn’t because I still use his cameras and lenses today.)  It wasn’t till later in the month that I would fall in love with film.  One night, my friend Kathleen invited me to a photography meet up that she planned to attend.  Having gone to many photo meet ups in the past with her, I showed up with all of my digital equipment ready to walk around downtown Austin.  When I arrived, I noticed that I was the only one with a digital camera and that everyone else were holding Holgas and other film cameras.  After meeting everyone, we decided to grab a couple frosty beers and talk “photo”.  After a couple of beers and some small talk, we then began to share photos. Cameron Russell, who was the one who organized the meeting that night for the group called “Plastic Lens Lovers of Austin”, pulled a little black camera out of his pocket and set it on the table.   I asked what kind of camera it was and he said it was a Lomo LC-A+RL.  He then continued to show me a few of the photos he had taken with the camera.  My first thought when I saw his Lomo camera was “There is no way those pictures are coming out of that little black camera!” I have now taken a couple thousand pictures with the LCA, and it is usually with me at all times. The Lomo has allowed me to really branch out creatively.  Being able to shoot multiple exposures offered an infinite amount of creative choices everywhere I went.   I had become bored with shooting normal digital pictures, and didn’t really shoot until I left on vacations or did photo shoots.  There were only so many pictures of the TX Capital you could take, and someone probably has a photo just like yours somewhere else.  The Lomo camera allows me to take a TX Capital photo and then double expose it with graffiti from the side of a downtown bar…and I’m pretty sure the chances of someone else having that same photo are slim to none.  I like that most of my images I could never shoot again if I tried. It’s like Christmas every time I visit the store to pick my pictures up cause I never know what I’m really going to get.  The excitement and anticipation almost kills me sometimes…I truly enjoy it.  With photography you to stop and smell the roses, but after smelling them, you then snap a picture of them to put on your wall for others to see…and that is one of the main reasons I continue to press the shutter release.

What would your ideal trip be like?
I would really like to take my cameras to Thailand.  Ideally, I would want a guide and translator to assist me throughout my trip to be able to access the regions that only locals could really travel to.If you could invent one thing, what would it be?
I would love to be the person that invents the machine that does energy fusion.  Ha ha…just playing.  In the photography world I would love to invent the first 1.0mm to 600mm f/1.0 zoom lens that costs around $100.  One day I’m sure they will have that.
Where was the most interesting place you’ve visited with your camera in hand?
I honestly think that it would have to be Italy.  It’s where I really fell in love with photography. I feel that the next time I visit Europe I might just have to make it my home.  Everything is picturesque over there; filled with life and character.
What are you’ve favorite subjects to snap?
I don’t really have a favorite subject because I get kind of bored shooting the same subjects over and over.  However, I do love storms, and could shoot those pretty regularly. I have always had a fascination with storms since I was very young.  Storms always bring chaos and excitement with them.  In the sky, the contrasts of light and dark make them look very ominous.  When I was a kid I had a dream that there was a tornado in our backyard, and I tied myself to a garden hose so I could go out and fly around in the tornado.  It was fun in the dream but nothing I ever tried in real life…I’m sure it would be some pretty cool pictures if I tried.  What are the main influences on the kind of photographs you take?
My influences are many, but there have been a few photographers that have stood out above the rest.   My first year I consider to be my “Digital” year, and my second year I consider to be my “Film” year.  During my first year I used to search flickr and find photos that I liked and then I’d try to take a similar photo with similar editing… Just to see if I could do it.  I pretty much attended my own school of photography, which was held in my room.  It was during this time that I came across Dustin Diaz’ inspiring 365 photo project.  (http://www.flickr.com/photos/polvero/sets/72157611811908959/
During my first year I was very lucky to be able to shoot with my twin Brother Justin.  We both share a love for photography.  I also liked the work of Dave Hill and really started to travel down the strobist path.  About the same time I also started looking into HDR and the work that Trey Ratcliff has done.  At the beginning of my second year, I then met Cameron Russell and started to explore the world of film.  Switching to the world of film has been very liberating.   I went from wanting to take the perfect picture to falling in love with the perfect imperfections, scratches and dust that can show up on film.  Now, I really admire the work of Miroslav Tichý, and his philosophy, which was that it wasn’t about how good he could make a photo but rather it was about how bad he could make a photo.  He would accomplish this through his homemade cameras that were made mainly from objects he found around his home. You can see an example of one of his cameras here: (http://www.artknowledgenews.com/2009-12-08-01-35-22-international-center-of-photography-icp-to-exhibit-of-the-work-by-reclusive-artist-miroslav-tichy.html) Gerhard Richter’s ability to combine photography and painting is also inspiring. I would really like to be able to create like he does one day.What got you into Lomography cameras?
My friend Cameron Russell was the first one to introduce me to the Lomo.  He actually has a tattoo of a Lomo camera on his arm, which is pretty cool.  Cameron, myself, and our friend Jennifer Joseph are all trying to put together an art show for March of 2011.  This art show is going to be centered around Lomography.  We hope that when people leave the show they will be inspired to go out and explore lomography for themselves.

What’s your opinion on the new “Sprocket Rocket” camera?
I actually just got the “Sprocket Rocket” camera in the mail a few days ago and am in the middle of my first roll.  Now, I just need to buy a scanner and I’m set.  Can’t wait!
What was your first camera?
My first camera was a Canon Digital Rebel XSi.  It was a very user friendly camera, and is great for any first time shooters. I also recommend that all first time shooters check out Michael the Mentor’s site here http://www.michaelthementor.com/. He does a great job of explaining all the camera basics.
What was your favourite photograph?
My favorite photo is probably my photo titled “The World Is Our Playground”.
This is a photo of a BMX rider doing a wheelie on top of the ocean.  Using a splitzer on my camera I first took a picture of the bike rider when he was flying in the air, and then I walked down to the beach to take the shot of the ocean.  I had hoped that the bike rider was at least over the ocean.  When I got it developed to my surprise the bike rider’s wheel lined up perfectly with the ocean. I also like how there appears to be a pyramid at the bottom left of the photo.  I couldn’t take this photo again if I wanted to. I love getting results like this with film. See it here: (http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/4884689230/in/set-72157624297905762/)
One other photo I am very proud of is a photo called “You Are What You Eat.  It was off one of the first rolls of film I ever shot, and was my first attempt at a double exposed self-portrait.  I hand held my Nikon FE2 in one hand and a key chain light in the other.  I then took a picture of a frying pan afterwards.  I was trying to fill up a roll of film so that I could get it processed.  Doing this forced me to be creative with stuff around my house. You can see the result here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/4429480325/in/set-72157623488975299/
Name one place you would love to be right now?
I have always felt that we as Americans should do more for the people of Darfur. I want to shoot photos of the atrocities that are happening over there.  I know the two warring groups are now in a cease-fire but I think that war will eventually flare up again.  I want to take photos that evoke emotion and hopefully influence the powers that be to increase aid.  I think photographers should always give back in this way.
What are your pro’s and con’s on film vs digital?
I know that I’ve talked a lot about film and digital already so I’ll make it pretty short.  I really use the two formats to achieve different results.  Personally, when I want to be more artistic I will usually choose film.  If I were shooting a sporting or political event for a newspaper I would probably use digital for the quick turnaround.  If I were to do a photo shoot nowadays I would probably use a combination of the two.
What style of photography would you like to try that you haven’t yet?
I would really like to try Wet Plate Photography.
How many photos do you think you’ve taken since that very first time you pressed the magic button?
I think I’ve probably taken around 15,000 photos in 2 years.  When I was doing a lot of digital photography it was common to have 1000 pictures in a shoot.How do you think having a camera in your hand effects your social interactions with people/ people you’ve never met before?
I think the lomo camera makes it easier to interact with people rather than my big digital camera.  The lomo camera is less obtrusive and seems less threatening to people when I bring it out.  Kids like me to chase them around with my Super Sampler…many times I turn it into a game where I try to get them with my camera.  Photography has allowed me to meet many new faces.  During our photo walks together as a group, many people stop to talk and ask us questions about photography…which hopefully leads to more new faces on our next photo walk.  One thing we like to do is take a shot at every bar we come to when we go out on a photo walk in the city…which leads to some pretty good times!
Whats your favourite camera and why?
My favorite camera is by far my Lomo LC-A+RL because it allows me to take a variety of artistic photos, and fits comfortably in my pocket.
Do you see your work as an extension of you as a person?
I’d like to think that my photos are a good representation of my thoughts and emotions.    Name one of the weirdest experimental tools you’ve made/ brought to photograph?
I took a handful of glow sticks to a photo meet up one night.  I wanted to use them to make it look like it was raining color.  So we set up a camera on a tripod and threw them each in the air.  The results were pretty cool.  It would of made a great photo for Skittles…you know, taste the rainbow! 
Is their anything you’d like to add?
I thank you for your time, and hope my words bring a little inspiration to whomever read them.   If you would like to see more of my photos you can on my flickr account which is: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/
I should get a website put together but I think I enjoy shooting pictures more than maintaining a website…ha ha. Photography has opened my eyes to the beauty in this world…now I just need enough film to capture it all.
 
Name: Marshall FosterFlickr: www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/Contact: marshall@major7thentertainment.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Hi! Could you kindly introduce yourself?

Hello, my name is Marshall Foster and I was born and raised in Texas. I currently live in Austin, and work in the music industry.

Marshall Lomo

Where about’s did you grow up and how do you think it influenced you later as a photographer?

I grew up in a town just 30 minutes south of Austin, TX called San Marcos. I believe that the places we grow up in have a great influence on us. These places are where we begin to view and engage the world around us. Growing up we, my twin Brother, Sister and I, all had to go to a Private Christian School for about 5 years. Over those 5 years we learned all about the battle between good and evil and the contrast of light verses dark. I think that lesson has always stayed with me. Now, I’d say that I’m more spiritual than religious, but am still in awe of the contrast of light and dark, and I love to photograph crosses and other holy symbols when I can. When I was a kid I really wanted to be an archaeologist and travel the world digging up bones and treasure.

What do you love about taking photographs?

I love photographing the fleeting moments of passion and emotion that are often too quick for the human eye to hold on to. I always want to dig deeper into a realm where unscripted beauty lies alongside honest emotion. This is why I enjoy shooting the world around us rather than doing photo shoots where shots are more contrived. When people view my photos I hope they gain an emotional experience with each one. To me, many of my photos beckon emotions such as confusion, sadness, happiness, fear or love. I also write music, and the one thing that I love most about writing music is hearing people talk about the emotional connection they made with the song after hearing it. I share this same idea with the photos I take.

Marshall Lomo

What motivates you to keep pressing the shutter release button?

I can remember the exact moment that I fell in love with photography. It was on July 28th, 2008., and we were in Venice Italy for work. I asked my friend Todd Purifoy, who is a professional photographer, if I could borrow his camera to walk around with. He said yes, and kindly showed me how to basically use the camera. After my camera lesson, I then took of to explore the wondrous city. I was hooked from the first moment I looked through the viewfinder and snapped my first photo! It was like a veil was lifted from my eyes. My mind seemed to summon beauty out from the shadows and lights. Lines and colors were overloading my senses but I couldn’t turn it off. The camera had forever changed the way I viewed the world. From then on I wanted to learn all I could about photography. I started reading books on photography, subscribing to photography magazines, and completing online tutorials on editing techniques. The more I learned, the more I experimented. In February of 2010 my grandfather gave me a couple of his old analogue cameras that he had used previously for many years. At first, I didn’t really know what to do with them and actually thought about taking the old cameras to the camera store to see about selling them because I didn’t think I would ever use them. (Later I would be grateful I didn’t because I still use his cameras and lenses today.) It wasn’t till later in the month that I would fall in love with film. One night, my friend Kathleen invited me to a photography meet up that she planned to attend. Having gone to many photo meet ups in the past with her, I showed up with all of my digital equipment ready to walk around downtown Austin. When I arrived, I noticed that I was the only one with a digital camera and that everyone else were holding Holgas and other film cameras. After meeting everyone, we decided to grab a couple frosty beers and talk “photo”. After a couple of beers and some small talk, we then began to share photos. Cameron Russell, who was the one who organized the meeting that night for the group called “Plastic Lens Lovers of Austin”, pulled a little black camera out of his pocket and set it on the table. I asked what kind of camera it was and he said it was a Lomo LC-A+RL. He then continued to show me a few of the photos he had taken with the camera. My first thought when I saw his Lomo camera was “There is no way those pictures are coming out of that little black camera!” I have now taken a couple thousand pictures with the LCA, and it is usually with me at all times. The Lomo has allowed me to really branch out creatively. Being able to shoot multiple exposures offered an infinite amount of creative choices everywhere I went. I had become bored with shooting normal digital pictures, and didn’t really shoot until I left on vacations or did photo shoots. There were only so many pictures of the TX Capital you could take, and someone probably has a photo just like yours somewhere else. The Lomo camera allows me to take a TX Capital photo and then double expose it with graffiti from the side of a downtown bar…and I’m pretty sure the chances of someone else having that same photo are slim to none. I like that most of my images I could never shoot again if I tried. It’s like Christmas every time I visit the store to pick my pictures up cause I never know what I’m really going to get. The excitement and anticipation almost kills me sometimes…I truly enjoy it. With photography you to stop and smell the roses, but after smelling them, you then snap a picture of them to put on your wall for others to see…and that is one of the main reasons I continue to press the shutter release.

Marshall Lomo

What would your ideal trip be like?

I would really like to take my cameras to Thailand. Ideally, I would want a guide and translator to assist me throughout my trip to be able to access the regions that only locals could really travel to.

If you could invent one thing, what would it be?

I would love to be the person that invents the machine that does energy fusion. Ha ha…just playing. In the photography world I would love to invent the first 1.0mm to 600mm f/1.0 zoom lens that costs around $100. One day I’m sure they will have that.

Where was the most interesting place you’ve visited with your camera in hand?

I honestly think that it would have to be Italy. It’s where I really fell in love with photography. I feel that the next time I visit Europe I might just have to make it my home. Everything is picturesque over there; filled with life and character.

Marshall Lomo

What are you’ve favorite subjects to snap?

I don’t really have a favorite subject because I get kind of bored shooting the same subjects over and over. However, I do love storms, and could shoot those pretty regularly. I have always had a fascination with storms since I was very young. Storms always bring chaos and excitement with them. In the sky, the contrasts of light and dark make them look very ominous. When I was a kid I had a dream that there was a tornado in our backyard, and I tied myself to a garden hose so I could go out and fly around in the tornado. It was fun in the dream but nothing I ever tried in real life…I’m sure it would be some pretty cool pictures if I tried.

What are the main influences on the kind of photographs you take?

My influences are many, but there have been a few photographers that have stood out above the rest. My first year I consider to be my “Digital” year, and my second year I consider to be my “Film” year. During my first year I used to search flickr and find photos that I liked and then I’d try to take a similar photo with similar editing… Just to see if I could do it. I pretty much attended my own school of photography, which was held in my room. It was during this time that I came across Dustin Diaz’ inspiring 365 photo project. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/polvero/sets/72157611811908959/

During my first year I was very lucky to be able to shoot with my twin Brother Justin. We both share a love for photography. I also liked the work of Dave Hill and really started to travel down the strobist path. About the same time I also started looking into HDR and the work that Trey Ratcliff has done. At the beginning of my second year, I then met Cameron Russell and started to explore the world of film. Switching to the world of film has been very liberating. I went from wanting to take the perfect picture to falling in love with the perfect imperfections, scratches and dust that can show up on film. Now, I really admire the work of Miroslav Tichý, and his philosophy, which was that it wasn’t about how good he could make a photo but rather it was about how bad he could make a photo. He would accomplish this through his homemade cameras that were made mainly from objects he found around his home. You can see an example of one of his cameras here: (http://www.artknowledgenews.com/2009-12-08-01-35-22-international-center-of-photography-icp-to-exhibit-of-the-work-by-reclusive-artist-miroslav-tichy.html) Gerhard Richter’s ability to combine photography and painting is also inspiring. I would really like to be able to create like he does one day.

What got you into Lomography cameras?

My friend Cameron Russell was the first one to introduce me to the Lomo. He actually has a tattoo of a Lomo camera on his arm, which is pretty cool. Cameron, myself, and our friend Jennifer Joseph are all trying to put together an art show for March of 2011. This art show is going to be centered around Lomography. We hope that when people leave the show they will be inspired to go out and explore lomography for themselves.

Marshall Lomo

What’s your opinion on the new “Sprocket Rocket” camera?

I actually just got the “Sprocket Rocket” camera in the mail a few days ago and am in the middle of my first roll. Now, I just need to buy a scanner and I’m set. Can’t wait!

What was your first camera?

My first camera was a Canon Digital Rebel XSi. It was a very user friendly camera, and is great for any first time shooters. I also recommend that all first time shooters check out Michael the Mentor’s site here http://www.michaelthementor.com/. He does a great job of explaining all the camera basics.

What was your favourite photograph?

My favorite photo is probably my photo titled “The World Is Our Playground”.

This is a photo of a BMX rider doing a wheelie on top of the ocean. Using a splitzer on my camera I first took a picture of the bike rider when he was flying in the air, and then I walked down to the beach to take the shot of the ocean. I had hoped that the bike rider was at least over the ocean. When I got it developed to my surprise the bike rider’s wheel lined up perfectly with the ocean. I also like how there appears to be a pyramid at the bottom left of the photo. I couldn’t take this photo again if I wanted to. I love getting results like this with film. See it here: (http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/4884689230/in/set-72157624297905762/)

One other photo I am very proud of is a photo called “You Are What You Eat. It was off one of the first rolls of film I ever shot, and was my first attempt at a double exposed self-portrait. I hand held my Nikon FE2 in one hand and a key chain light in the other. I then took a picture of a frying pan afterwards. I was trying to fill up a roll of film so that I could get it processed. Doing this forced me to be creative with stuff around my house. You can see the result here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/4429480325/in/set-72157623488975299/

Name one place you would love to be right now?

I have always felt that we as Americans should do more for the people of Darfur. I want to shoot photos of the atrocities that are happening over there. I know the two warring groups are now in a cease-fire but I think that war will eventually flare up again. I want to take photos that evoke emotion and hopefully influence the powers that be to increase aid. I think photographers should always give back in this way.

What are your pro’s and con’s on film vs digital?

I know that I’ve talked a lot about film and digital already so I’ll make it pretty short. I really use the two formats to achieve different results. Personally, when I want to be more artistic I will usually choose film. If I were shooting a sporting or political event for a newspaper I would probably use digital for the quick turnaround. If I were to do a photo shoot nowadays I would probably use a combination of the two.

What style of photography would you like to try that you haven’t yet?

I would really like to try Wet Plate Photography.

Marshall Lomo

How many photos do you think you’ve taken since that very first time you pressed the magic button?

I think I’ve probably taken around 15,000 photos in 2 years. When I was doing a lot of digital photography it was common to have 1000 pictures in a shoot.

How do you think having a camera in your hand effects your social interactions with people/ people you’ve never met before?

I think the lomo camera makes it easier to interact with people rather than my big digital camera. The lomo camera is less obtrusive and seems less threatening to people when I bring it out. Kids like me to chase them around with my Super Sampler…many times I turn it into a game where I try to get them with my camera. Photography has allowed me to meet many new faces. During our photo walks together as a group, many people stop to talk and ask us questions about photography…which hopefully leads to more new faces on our next photo walk. One thing we like to do is take a shot at every bar we come to when we go out on a photo walk in the city…which leads to some pretty good times!

Whats your favourite camera and why?

My favorite camera is by far my Lomo LC-A+RL because it allows me to take a variety of artistic photos, and fits comfortably in my pocket.

Do you see your work as an extension of you as a person?

I’d like to think that my photos are a good representation of my thoughts and emotions.

Name one of the weirdest experimental tools you’ve made/ brought to photograph?

I took a handful of glow sticks to a photo meet up one night. I wanted to use them to make it look like it was raining color. So we set up a camera on a tripod and threw them each in the air. The results were pretty cool. It would of made a great photo for Skittles…you know, taste the rainbow! 

Is their anything you’d like to add?

I thank you for your time, and hope my words bring a little inspiration to whomever read them. If you would like to see more of my photos you can on my flickr account which is: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/

I should get a website put together but I think I enjoy shooting pictures more than maintaining a website…ha ha. Photography has opened my eyes to the beauty in this world…now I just need enough film to capture it all.

Name: Marshall Foster
Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/
Contact: 
marshall@major7thentertainment.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Konnichiha, could you please introduce yourself and tell us where your from?
I came from another planet called Opticania, Its a Paradise filled with Cameras (at least I hope I was from there).
2. So the name Mijonju is acronym of your real name?
Michel Jones its my real name, people look at me and say I don’t look western. We’ll I might be adopted right?3. As a photographer what characteristics do you like about living Japan?
I am not a really a photographer, I just do it as a hobby. Living in Japan is very similar to Opticania I usually ride around with my Straida bike with a camera and shoot around the city in my free time.4. How much do you like cameras?
As much as a fat boy who loves chocolate cake.
5. Where did you learn to use a camera?
My mom was a real photographer for the local newspaper, and my dad"not a good photographer, but works at Kodak".6. What’s your favourite camera that you own?
I have a few, I’ll list them here:
Konica instant Press
Konica c35 FD / auto s3, same thing but i have both.
LC-A
7. Tell us something interesting about yourself?
Would you freak out if I had 2 tongues? I know many languages, and the reason for that is because when I was a kid I traveled a lot. And I am addicted to shutter sounds and pressing the shutter button.
8. Why did you start collecting cameras?
Because every camera has its own spirit, I can’t really explain it, I like collecting and using them. It’s not the brand of cameras but every camera itself, I used to have two Rollei 35S’ that looked identical, but their was this one that I just didn’t like and I had to sell it. The reason I started collecting them is more like an illness, anything that has a circle and a rectangle shape attracts me.9. Can you remember when you first got into photography?
Around 2-3 years ago, I got disappointed using a Canon DSLR camera and then I found how much I like using my mom’s Minolta 101B.10. Why did you start the “Mijonju Show”?
The Mijonju Show started when I was just talking about a few cameras with my friends.

11. You’ve got a lot of your photographs on the Lomography website, how do you think the Lomographic Society has helped introduce people to analogue photography?
A lot, I’m thankful to them for exposing me to more of their camera loving people. I’m extremely thankful.
12. What do you like about the Lomo style of taking photos?
I don’t really know the Lomo style, I just like the LC-A because of its flexible way of using many techniques and I love how simple it is to use. I like how detail is not the main point but instead it’s interestingness of the content.
13. I’ve seen you like going to camera shops and trade shows, what’s the most awesome camera you’ve come across?
Hasselblad with a Phraseone back - 2 masterpieces fitted together.14. Do you have any tips for shopping for cameras in Japan?
Look for shops where the prices are decided by the person who sells it instead of the shop keeper. There are some camera shops in Japan where the clients just rent out a little space for them to put their cameras there. Some clients tend to make it cheap so that the item will be sold immediately.15. You’ve been involved with the Impossible Project pretty much right from the start, how did you hear about it?
There was a site called Polapremium a few years ago where I got some of the film. I also joined Polaroid.com, I was a quiet user as I just sit and watch, but I really love what they are doing so I used my show to make a place for myself in this circle.
 16. What’s the new Polaroid film like?
Many colours and its amazing :) I can’t tell in detail, its a secret.17. You tinker/ DIY with your cameras quite often, what’s been your favourite result so far?
Well my favourite one is a Konica Instant Press with a broken bellow, but I took 5 hours to learn and made a new bellows for it. Till this very moment I still find it amazing that I made the bellow so successfully.

18. Do you ever Xpro your film/ what do you think to the effect?
Sometimes - I tried doing it once with a friend and I got poisoned I felt horrible.Anyway Xpro is pretty nice, I love the memorizing colors that it produces, some are tinted and some are nicely even. Over all I love it, but I don’t usually do it.19. You started a blog called www.circlerectangle.com, tell us a little bit about it?
It’s actually a company that I am going to create on my own, I’m also going to open a café in that name too. Now all I am doing is saving money for this amazing café to be created. Circle Rectangle is my dream café that i wish to create but I just need more savings to create.20. Have you seen the design for the “Holga D”?
Yes it’s amazing, but he said it would need a full frame sensor. I don’t think anyone would buy a full frame sensored camera with a plastic lens. It’s do able but this will only happen when full frame sensors become extremely cheap.
21. Pretend their was a sumo fight between film and digital cameras, metaphorically speaking who do you think would win and why?
I don’t think people realize this but film has more depth and dimension. The bigger the capturing medium the more depth and deepness, I think this makes the photo look more sophisticated. That’s why SX-70’ have beautiful photos with amazing depth of field, even if its through an F8 lens. Imagine how much it would cost to make a digital sensor at the size of a Polaroid film? Major digital cameras out there have small sensors, commonly 1.7” and so on… That’s why the photos come out flat and lifeless. The Canon EOS 1D Mark 3 is the camera that can be put in the sumo ring for a fight because these cameras have digital sensors the size of a 35mm film. If you had to put these 2 in a ring I’d say the fight will be long, winning or loosing depends on the person who uses it. If you like to shoot start trails and long exposures, film would surely win. If you need to shoot many photos and continuous shooting then digital wins. If you like compact full frame photos, film wins. You can put a roll of film into a Natura Black 1.9 which is the size of your palm and put it in your pocket. As for digital, you need a big camera with a full frame sensor with a nice expensive piece of glass and a fast lens to be able to do something equivalent to a Natura Black 1.9.
22. Do you ever collaborate with other photographers?
Yes I do, in fact I’d love to do it a lot more, I can’t do it often because of my work, but if im really free I’ll do it.23. You’ve met some pretty interesting people recently, name a few people who we should check out?
Check out the Impossible Project, spread the word that instant integral films are back.
You should check out:
The Impossible Project: http://www.the-impossible-project.com/
Ryu Itsuki: http://ryuitsuki.com/
TM Wong (He probably has the most Polaroid’s ever collected, he has over 1500 different Polaroid cameras): http://www.polala.hk/my-list/index.html
Artsy Ken: http://www.artsyken.com/
Brian: http://zokyo.jp/

24. What’s your favourite camera of all time?
Of all time, hmm this is really hard. I guess the Konica C35 FD in black is my favorite :)
25. Finally thanks for your time, is their anything you’d like to add?
Nope :) Thank you for the interview as well!
 
Name: Michel Jones Website: www.circlerectangle.comContact: mijonju@gmail.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Konnichiha, could you please introduce yourself and tell us where your from?

I came from another planet called Opticania, Its a Paradise filled with Cameras (at least I hope I was from there).

Mijonju

2. So the name Mijonju is acronym of your real name?

Michel Jones its my real name, people look at me and say I don’t look western. We’ll I might be adopted right?

3. As a photographer what characteristics do you like about living Japan?

I am not a really a photographer, I just do it as a hobby. Living in Japan is very similar to Opticania I usually ride around with my Straida bike with a camera and shoot around the city in my free time.

4. How much do you like cameras?

As much as a fat boy who loves chocolate cake.

Michel Jones

5. Where did you learn to use a camera?

My mom was a real photographer for the local newspaper, and my dad
"not a good photographer, but works at Kodak".

6. What’s your favourite camera that you own?

I have a few, I’ll list them here:

  • Konica instant Press
  • Konica c35 FD / auto s3, same thing but i have both.
  • LC-A

7. Tell us something interesting about yourself?

Would you freak out if I had 2 tongues? I know many languages, and the reason for that is because when I was a kid I traveled a lot. And I am addicted to shutter sounds and pressing the shutter button.

Cameras

8. Why did you start collecting cameras?

Because every camera has its own spirit, I can’t really explain it, I like collecting and using them. It’s not the brand of cameras but every camera itself, I used to have two Rollei 35S’ that looked identical, but their was this one that I just didn’t like and I had to sell it. The reason I started collecting them is more like an illness, anything that has a circle and a rectangle shape attracts me.

9. Can you remember when you first got into photography?

Around 2-3 years ago, I got disappointed using a Canon DSLR camera and then I found how much I like using my mom’s Minolta 101B.

10. Why did you start the “Mijonju Show”?

The Mijonju Show started when I was just talking about a few cameras with my friends.

Japan

11. You’ve got a lot of your photographs on the Lomography website, how do you think the Lomographic Society has helped introduce people to analogue photography?

A lot, I’m thankful to them for exposing me to more of their camera loving people. I’m extremely thankful.

12. What do you like about the Lomo style of taking photos?

I don’t really know the Lomo style, I just like the LC-A because of its flexible way of using many techniques and I love how simple it is to use. I like how detail is not the main point but instead it’s interestingness of the content.

Photo

13. I’ve seen you like going to camera shops and trade shows, what’s the most awesome camera you’ve come across?

Hasselblad with a Phraseone back - 2 masterpieces fitted together.

14. Do you have any tips for shopping for cameras in Japan?

Look for shops where the prices are decided by the person who sells it instead of the shop keeper. There are some camera shops in Japan where the clients just rent out a little space for them to put their cameras there. Some clients tend to make it cheap so that the item will be sold immediately.

15. You’ve been involved with the Impossible Project pretty much right from the start, how did you hear about it?

There was a site called Polapremium a few years ago where I got some of the film. I also joined Polaroid.com, I was a quiet user as I just sit and watch, but I really love what they are doing so I used my show to make a place for myself in this circle.

 16. What’s the new Polaroid film like?

Many colours and its amazing :) I can’t tell in detail, its a secret.

17. You tinker/ DIY with your cameras quite often, what’s been your favourite result so far?

Well my favourite one is a Konica Instant Press with a broken bellow, but I took 5 hours to learn and made a new bellows for it. Till this very moment I still find it amazing that I made the bellow so successfully.

Photo

18. Do you ever Xpro your film/ what do you think to the effect?

Sometimes - I tried doing it once with a friend and I got poisoned I felt horrible.
Anyway Xpro is pretty nice, I love the memorizing colors that it produces, some are tinted and some are nicely even. Over all I love it, but I don’t usually do it.

19. You started a blog called www.circlerectangle.com, tell us a little bit about it?

It’s actually a company that I am going to create on my own, I’m also going to open a café in that name too. Now all I am doing is saving money for this amazing café to be created. Circle Rectangle is my dream café that i wish to create but I just need more savings to create.

20. Have you seen the design for the “Holga D”?

Yes it’s amazing, but he said it would need a full frame sensor. I don’t think anyone would buy a full frame sensored camera with a plastic lens. It’s do able but this will only happen when full frame sensors become extremely cheap.

Photo

21. Pretend their was a sumo fight between film and digital cameras, metaphorically speaking who do you think would win and why?

I don’t think people realize this but film has more depth and dimension. The bigger the capturing medium the more depth and deepness, I think this makes the photo look more sophisticated. That’s why SX-70’ have beautiful photos with amazing depth of field, even if its through an F8 lens. Imagine how much it would cost to make a digital sensor at the size of a Polaroid film? Major digital cameras out there have small sensors, commonly 1.7” and so on… That’s why the photos come out flat and lifeless. The Canon EOS 1D Mark 3 is the camera that can be put in the sumo ring for a fight because these cameras have digital sensors the size of a 35mm film. If you had to put these 2 in a ring I’d say the fight will be long, winning or loosing depends on the person who uses it. If you like to shoot start trails and long exposures, film would surely win. If you need to shoot many photos and continuous shooting then digital wins. If you like compact full frame photos, film wins. You can put a roll of film into a Natura Black 1.9 which is the size of your palm and put it in your pocket. As for digital, you need a big camera with a full frame sensor with a nice expensive piece of glass and a fast lens to be able to do something equivalent to a Natura Black 1.9.

22. Do you ever collaborate with other photographers?

Yes I do, in fact I’d love to do it a lot more, I can’t do it often because of my work, but if im really free I’ll do it.

23. You’ve met some pretty interesting people recently, name a few people who we should check out?

Check out the Impossible Project, spread the word that instant integral films are back.

You should check out:

Photo

24. What’s your favourite camera of all time?

Of all time, hmm this is really hard. I guess the Konica C35 FD in black is my favorite :)

25. Finally thanks for your time, is their anything you’d like to add?

Nope :) Thank you for the interview as well!

Name: Michel Jones 
Website: www.circlerectangle.com
Contact: 
mijonju@gmail.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Dia duit, could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where abouts your from?
Hi, my name is Connor Maguire and was originally born on the Falls Road in Belfast in 1977. My family moved to Downpatrick around this time to get away from the troubles which were ongoing in Northern Ireland at this time especially in the area where I was born in Belfast.
2. How do you think Irish culture has shaped your art?
In regards to Irish culture having an effect on my art, I believe it has had a big impact especially when I was growing up and then progressing working as an artist. I always loved the Celtic designs and everything that had an element of Irish mythology. I remember going to mass when I was kid and I had more interest in the stained glass windows rather than listening to what the priest was preaching about. I was always doodling in black pen on the front of schoolbooks mucking about with different designs and ideas, this was again usually the result of boredom and just wanting to get back to drawing which was something I did everyday. I was also inspired and liked the works of Jim Fitzpatrick who is an Irish artist based in Dublin who specializes and works in the theme of Irish folklore whom I admired growing up.

3. A lot of your paintings feature strong images of the Irish landscape, is the nature of Ireland something you want to portray in your work?
Yes, I would like to portray the landscape that I am surrounded by in my work. At the moment I am living in the country where you can see the Mourne Mountains and is very rural in regards of my location. I would like to put more of a twist portraying the landscape rather than do a simple painting of a landscape. I think more traditional landscape paintings are quite boring therefore that’s why I try and put a bit more colour and exaggerate or concentrate more in particular parts of the landscape that I like.
4. What was your experience like at the University of Ulster?
To be honest I kind of hated my time at university. However this was probably halfway down to me being a bit of a home-bird at the time and it was a completely different culture shock moving away from home for the first time and living in student accommodation with 5 other strangers having to look out for yourself. I ended up just going out more and getting caught up in the whole social scene more than actually painting. I was a bit more hesitant also to take on advice and listen to tutors and wanted to do paintings the way I wanted to, so didn’t like that so much. However I’m glad I went even though I hated it. I suppose everyone needs to experience the good with the bad which in the end makes you who you are today. At least that’s what I think anyway.
5. What resources did the university have in place for young artists like yourself?
I suppose they had everything that a student needs to learn like books, computers, tutors and assistance when it was needed. Things like financial help was handy when I spent all my money on beers or a night out I would have to apply for a hardship grant again. Only got about £30 though.

6. What was your time like working in New York?
New York was brilliant. I don’t think I appreciated it though as much until I got back. I am currently working on a piece producing a limited edition lino-cut entitled “Dreams of New York”, as I would love to get back over there. I’ve just had a baby though so will be a few years yet before I can get over there for a proper stay.
7. Did you get inspired by the bright lights?
Oh yes. I remember when we left JFK airport we went straight to the subway. While traveling underground you couldn’t help but feel excited. When we made our way out of the underground the first thing I could see was the skyscrapers and the shadows of these huge buildings with the sun shining through. Walking down the sidewalk as they call it was even spectacular, the manholes on the road had steam flowing into the air and the people themselves all seemed to have a personality of their own which you could see on the outside almost like they wore them on their sleeves. This might sound a bit weird or I am not explaining this right but in comparison to the people in Belfast or Ireland the people are very reserved and worry about their image or what people might think in regards to making passive remarks. In New York it was like you could walk down the street naked and no one would blink an eyelid. It’s like the unusual was just the usual if you know what I mean. There was an element of danger and excitement at the same time like a feeling of being alive. That probably sounds really dramatic but there always something new or happening. You just had to open your eyes. If I was to live in a city then it would be New York and if not it would be in the country or near a coastline where you could kite surf everyday.
8. Did you meet and work with many fellow artists whilst in the big apple?
I visited a lot of galleries and the New York museum where I would never have seen such original paintings in the flesh like Klimt, Pollock, Picasso and so on. I was in Long Island where I visited Jackson Pollock’s house where he lived. By coincidence we met a film crew who were telling me that they just finished filming the final scenes for the film “POLLOCK" which was due out the next year (2000) featuring Ed Harris who played Jackson Pollock. I got the film and have watched it several times. I don’t know whether I have brainwashed myself into thinking this is the best film ever made or whether it is because when I watch it I remind myself that I was there. Kind of like looking at an old photograph of a time when you visited somewhere and you are looking back. Anyway I have the movie and watch it now and again so if you haven’t seen it you should check it out. There was a nice corky soundtrack to it as well.

9. You’ve done a lot of exhibitions, do you think that it’s one of the best ways to get your art our their to the public?
Yes it’s a good way and probably one of the main ways in order to get your work into the public eye as galleries don’t usually take you on unless you have a portfolio or resume showing how serious you are as an artist. I hate doing solo exhibitions though as there is a lot of work and expense that goes into it especially now in these economic times. Currently at the moment I am just taking part in group shows and exhibiting through galleries. 
10. Your work has been featured in a lot of Irish newspapers; did you get much response from people who liked your work?
Yes there is always emails and feedback coming through. Especially when you do a solo exhibition you want to get as much exposure as possible so I got a radio interview on the BBC talking about one of my exhibitions called “A Collection So Far”. This was followed up by Culture Northern Ireland and an Irish News interview. All these forms of reviews/interviews are good as a way of exposure telling people when and where an exhibition is taking place. It’s also good because people then go looking for who you are so it can work well like promoting a sale.

11. What artists do you admire?
There are so many I probably couldn’t name them. I admire anyone who can work in a technical illustrative way and at the same time someone who can work loose and produce work which is suggestive and just as visually appealing as a piece of work that is highly detailed if you know what I mean. There are the masters of course which im sure everyone has heard of like Dali, Turner, Degas, Leonardo Da Vinci and so on. Looking at the shelf here I particularly like works by Matisse, Diego Riviera, Edward Hopper, Mc Escher, Michael Sowa and Hundertwasser. It’s a bit of a mixture there with all different styles and from different eras. Im currently getting into the linocuts and woodcuts and love work by the German expressionists Erich Heckle, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and above all Kathe Kollwitz. You should check some of these artists out. There work is fantastic working in craved woodblocks and producing really strong artworks in black and white.
12. The clouds in your latest work is something that stands out for me, would you consider your work abstract at all?
I suppose I would in a way. I have been concentrating on composition and producing the latest body of work which has more of a symbolic look to it. for example if you were to ask someone to randomly draw a cloud, everyone has an idea of what a cloud looks like and so will draw something fluffy or curved and bumpy. It’s like putting all these ideas into a picture using your minds eye so to speak drawing or painting in a naïve way and at the same time trying to paint or create a kind of realism with the paint. It’s kind of hard to explain. I have an idea of what I want something to look like and I just juggle around with what fits best. I think some of the work may possibly border on abstract but I suppose it depends on how you look at something yourself.

13. Is the piece “Coming Home” inspired from the time you came back from America?
Coming Home wasn’t so much based on returning from America but mainly coincided with everyday events. In other articles I have said that coming home is what everyone loves. By getting up in the morning or going to school or whatever everybody loves coming home. I know I do anyway. The idea of the ship in the distance was coming home but the ship was guided by the swirling lighthouse which was reaching out to it showing it the direction. I enjoyed this painting as I was trying to give the lighthouse more of an organic feel and almost alive. Every one needs guidance in their life at some stage of their life no matter how little or big. I suppose this question kind of relates to the question before hand in regards to the work being abstract so kind of demonstrates how you can look at something with a symbolic meaning. Whether this sort of painting would be considered abstract again I’ll leave that with viewer; I would have thought more contemporary possibly?
14. How has the freedom of being a freelance artist aided your creativity?
Working freelance is never easy. You don’t know when your next wage is coming, there are no benefits, holidays and you have to be extremely disciplined. These are all the bad things but the more positive things are you can do and work in any direction you like. If someone doesn’t like the direction your work has taken then tough. You are working for yourself and you can stretch ideas or work in whatever medium you like as long as you are happy. However you still have to make a living so sometimes you also have to do things that you don’t like in order to make money

15. What projects are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I have been trying to get back into linocuts and woodcuts and am sketching out drawings for a New York, limited edition print in A3 size. I think I mentioned it earlier in the interview entitling it “Dreams of New York”. I am also trying to get another few larger paintings done and am wanting to produce a few more works involving figures or portraiture in oils on canvas.
16. You received a letter from Prince Charles congratulating you on your art, how did this make you feel?
This was a surprise. I was having a beer with my girlfriend in a pub and I got a phone call on my mobile asking if I wished to take part in an exhibition in Hillsborough Castle which is famously known for its peace talks with Northern Irelands politicians and one of the main spots were royalty stays when they are visiting the province. Anyway they asked if I would like to work along side the Princes Trust as it’s main representative for the exhibition. I approached them months before applying for a grant in order to purchase framing equipment which I got and that was how they were informed of the work that I did. The exhibition took place and I was forwarded a letter which was then put in all copies of the catalogue at the foreword which was shown in each book. It was a great pleasure and was very pleased at the fact that I had been asked to do this especially when I was just starting out as an artist.
17. What did it mean to you to be the youngest person to be granted membership of the Ulster Watercolour Society?
Again I was very pleased to be accepted into the UWS at such an age. I thought it was great as no one else had ever been accepted before and to win an award was even better at the first exhibition I took part in. Although it had its downfalls too; I remember looking at one of my paintings with my dad and someone coming up to me and saying your dads a great artist. I just went along with it and hoped maybe I would grow some facial hair next week to look a bit older. Still hasn’t happened. However it is great being the first youngest member and now they have started taking younger members on now every year.
18. What music do you listen to?
I listen all sorts of different music. I particularly like music with big beats that has element of ambience and is more instrumental than vocal throughout. Some of the beat stuff I would listen to would be the likes of record label Ninja Tune that represent artists like DJ Shadow who I think is amazing. Other artists like David Holmes who is from Belfast originally but is responsible for a lot of soundtracks you hear on some of the latest movie releases made in Hollywood. Other artists who fall under this genre are like Red Snapper, DJ Food, The Orb, Coldcut, Massive Attack and many others. Music with vocals perhaps would the likes of Beth Orton, Gomez, Zero 7, Florence and The Machine and a bit of jazz. I can’t stand all that chart music stuff. It’s all crap apart from one or two that slip in there but then again that’s just my opinion. Everyone’s different.

19. How did the opportunity to have your work printed and sold on greetings cards come about?
I actually started that up myself. I thought it would be a good idea to get the work into print so as I could get it into mainstream card and craft shops which again acts as a business card in a way and reaching out to the public. I did all the Photoshop work myself after getting the work scanned in by just cleaning up around the edges and am planning on purchasing a giclee printing machine later in the year hopefully. This all cuts down costs but doing these things yourself costs a lot of time which I have less and less of these days.
20. What do you like about the medium of printing?
Unlike giclee printing which is a mechanical process printing digitally takes no effort at all apart from changing the odd ink cartridge which is quite an empty and heartless process. Producing linocuts and woodcuts it’s a completely different feeling that you can’t explain. There is nothing like cutting into a block working in reverse and trying to imagine how it might look finished. By the time you have finished cutting the block its time to ink the block up and put it through the press. I find this extremely exciting with the process of placing the block on the press then laying the paper on top, then you hope to achieve a perfect print but you won’t know until you peel the paper back from the wet block. When you get a good print you feel a sense of achievement and when you get a bad print you feel like shit. It’s that personal and emotional when you are producing prints that have been carved and printed by yourself. Anyone reading this that isn’t familiar with printmaking will be going “get a life mate, how can you get so worked up about making a print”. I can only say I don’t know, I just do and I love it.
21. What motivates you to make art?
Motivation comes and goes. Some days I feel so motivated I can’t put the brushes down and others I can’t even look at one. Again I don’t know why I draw and paint. I just know that I am unhappy, frustrated and a bit lost as to what I am doing. I think I just have to be busy all the time but there are several times when I can find myself looking at a blank page just staring or loosely scribbling because I just cant get started for some reason. Sometimes when I know I have to paint something then I know I have to get started. If I don’t that image or feeling will stay with me for ages so whether it is month or years down the line I know I have to produce something in order to get rid of that. Once it’s painted that feeling, curiosity or image is gone and it feels good. Sounds a bit odd and weird but that’s the best way I can explain it.

22. Finally, thank you for taking the time to answer the questions, is their anything you would like to add?
Mmmmmmmmm I can’t really think of anything. Only thing is that im going to be painting for as long as I can. I’m pretty lucky im able to make money at it and if I wasn’t able to then I would still be doing the same thing anyway. For me painting is just a way of life. 
Name: Connor MaguireWebsite: www.connormaguire.comContact: art@connormaguire.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Dia duit, could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where abouts your from?

Hi, my name is Connor Maguire and was originally born on the Falls Road in Belfast in 1977. My family moved to Downpatrick around this time to get away from the troubles which were ongoing in Northern Ireland at this time especially in the area where I was born in Belfast.

2. How do you think Irish culture has shaped your art?

In regards to Irish culture having an effect on my art, I believe it has had a big impact especially when I was growing up and then progressing working as an artist. I always loved the Celtic designs and everything that had an element of Irish mythology. I remember going to mass when I was kid and I had more interest in the stained glass windows rather than listening to what the priest was preaching about. I was always doodling in black pen on the front of schoolbooks mucking about with different designs and ideas, this was again usually the result of boredom and just wanting to get back to drawing which was something I did everyday. I was also inspired and liked the works of Jim Fitzpatrick who is an Irish artist based in Dublin who specializes and works in the theme of Irish folklore whom I admired growing up.

Connor Maguire

3. A lot of your paintings feature strong images of the Irish landscape, is the nature of Ireland something you want to portray in your work?

Yes, I would like to portray the landscape that I am surrounded by in my work. At the moment I am living in the country where you can see the Mourne Mountains and is very rural in regards of my location. I would like to put more of a twist portraying the landscape rather than do a simple painting of a landscape. I think more traditional landscape paintings are quite boring therefore that’s why I try and put a bit more colour and exaggerate or concentrate more in particular parts of the landscape that I like.

4. What was your experience like at the University of Ulster?

To be honest I kind of hated my time at university. However this was probably halfway down to me being a bit of a home-bird at the time and it was a completely different culture shock moving away from home for the first time and living in student accommodation with 5 other strangers having to look out for yourself. I ended up just going out more and getting caught up in the whole social scene more than actually painting. I was a bit more hesitant also to take on advice and listen to tutors and wanted to do paintings the way I wanted to, so didn’t like that so much. However I’m glad I went even though I hated it. I suppose everyone needs to experience the good with the bad which in the end makes you who you are today. At least that’s what I think anyway.

5. What resources did the university have in place for young artists like yourself?

I suppose they had everything that a student needs to learn like books, computers, tutors and assistance when it was needed. Things like financial help was handy when I spent all my money on beers or a night out I would have to apply for a hardship grant again. Only got about £30 though.

Connor Maguire

6. What was your time like working in New York?

New York was brilliant. I don’t think I appreciated it though as much until I got back. I am currently working on a piece producing a limited edition lino-cut entitled “Dreams of New York”, as I would love to get back over there. I’ve just had a baby though so will be a few years yet before I can get over there for a proper stay.

7. Did you get inspired by the bright lights?

Oh yes. I remember when we left JFK airport we went straight to the subway. While traveling underground you couldn’t help but feel excited. When we made our way out of the underground the first thing I could see was the skyscrapers and the shadows of these huge buildings with the sun shining through. Walking down the sidewalk as they call it was even spectacular, the manholes on the road had steam flowing into the air and the people themselves all seemed to have a personality of their own which you could see on the outside almost like they wore them on their sleeves. This might sound a bit weird or I am not explaining this right but in comparison to the people in Belfast or Ireland the people are very reserved and worry about their image or what people might think in regards to making passive remarks. In New York it was like you could walk down the street naked and no one would blink an eyelid. It’s like the unusual was just the usual if you know what I mean. There was an element of danger and excitement at the same time like a feeling of being alive. That probably sounds really dramatic but there always something new or happening. You just had to open your eyes. If I was to live in a city then it would be New York and if not it would be in the country or near a coastline where you could kite surf everyday.

8. Did you meet and work with many fellow artists whilst in the big apple?

I visited a lot of galleries and the New York museum where I would never have seen such original paintings in the flesh like Klimt, Pollock, Picasso and so on. I was in Long Island where I visited Jackson Pollock’s house where he lived. By coincidence we met a film crew who were telling me that they just finished filming the final scenes for the film “POLLOCK" which was due out the next year (2000) featuring Ed Harris who played Jackson Pollock. I got the film and have watched it several times. I don’t know whether I have brainwashed myself into thinking this is the best film ever made or whether it is because when I watch it I remind myself that I was there. Kind of like looking at an old photograph of a time when you visited somewhere and you are looking back. Anyway I have the movie and watch it now and again so if you haven’t seen it you should check it out. There was a nice corky soundtrack to it as well.

Connor Maguire

9. You’ve done a lot of exhibitions, do you think that it’s one of the best ways to get your art our their to the public?

Yes it’s a good way and probably one of the main ways in order to get your work into the public eye as galleries don’t usually take you on unless you have a portfolio or resume showing how serious you are as an artist. I hate doing solo exhibitions though as there is a lot of work and expense that goes into it especially now in these economic times. Currently at the moment I am just taking part in group shows and exhibiting through galleries. 

10. Your work has been featured in a lot of Irish newspapers; did you get much response from people who liked your work?

Yes there is always emails and feedback coming through. Especially when you do a solo exhibition you want to get as much exposure as possible so I got a radio interview on the BBC talking about one of my exhibitions called “A Collection So Far”. This was followed up by Culture Northern Ireland and an Irish News interview. All these forms of reviews/interviews are good as a way of exposure telling people when and where an exhibition is taking place. It’s also good because people then go looking for who you are so it can work well like promoting a sale.

Connor Maguire

11. What artists do you admire?

There are so many I probably couldn’t name them. I admire anyone who can work in a technical illustrative way and at the same time someone who can work loose and produce work which is suggestive and just as visually appealing as a piece of work that is highly detailed if you know what I mean. There are the masters of course which im sure everyone has heard of like Dali, Turner, Degas, Leonardo Da Vinci and so on. Looking at the shelf here I particularly like works by Matisse, Diego Riviera, Edward Hopper, Mc EscherMichael Sowa and Hundertwasser. It’s a bit of a mixture there with all different styles and from different eras. Im currently getting into the linocuts and woodcuts and love work by the German expressionists Erich Heckle, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and above all Kathe Kollwitz. You should check some of these artists out. There work is fantastic working in craved woodblocks and producing really strong artworks in black and white.

12. The clouds in your latest work is something that stands out for me, would you consider your work abstract at all?

I suppose I would in a way. I have been concentrating on composition and producing the latest body of work which has more of a symbolic look to it. for example if you were to ask someone to randomly draw a cloud, everyone has an idea of what a cloud looks like and so will draw something fluffy or curved and bumpy. It’s like putting all these ideas into a picture using your minds eye so to speak drawing or painting in a naïve way and at the same time trying to paint or create a kind of realism with the paint. It’s kind of hard to explain. I have an idea of what I want something to look like and I just juggle around with what fits best. I think some of the work may possibly border on abstract but I suppose it depends on how you look at something yourself.

Connor Maguire

13. Is the piece “Coming Home” inspired from the time you came back from America?

Coming Home wasn’t so much based on returning from America but mainly coincided with everyday events. In other articles I have said that coming home is what everyone loves. By getting up in the morning or going to school or whatever everybody loves coming home. I know I do anyway. The idea of the ship in the distance was coming home but the ship was guided by the swirling lighthouse which was reaching out to it showing it the direction. I enjoyed this painting as I was trying to give the lighthouse more of an organic feel and almost alive. Every one needs guidance in their life at some stage of their life no matter how little or big. I suppose this question kind of relates to the question before hand in regards to the work being abstract so kind of demonstrates how you can look at something with a symbolic meaning. Whether this sort of painting would be considered abstract again I’ll leave that with viewer; I would have thought more contemporary possibly?

14. How has the freedom of being a freelance artist aided your creativity?

Working freelance is never easy. You don’t know when your next wage is coming, there are no benefits, holidays and you have to be extremely disciplined. These are all the bad things but the more positive things are you can do and work in any direction you like. If someone doesn’t like the direction your work has taken then tough. You are working for yourself and you can stretch ideas or work in whatever medium you like as long as you are happy. However you still have to make a living so sometimes you also have to do things that you don’t like in order to make money

Connor Maguire

15. What projects are you working on at the moment?

At the moment I have been trying to get back into linocuts and woodcuts and am sketching out drawings for a New York, limited edition print in A3 size. I think I mentioned it earlier in the interview entitling it “Dreams of New York”. I am also trying to get another few larger paintings done and am wanting to produce a few more works involving figures or portraiture in oils on canvas.

16. You received a letter from Prince Charles congratulating you on your art, how did this make you feel?

This was a surprise. I was having a beer with my girlfriend in a pub and I got a phone call on my mobile asking if I wished to take part in an exhibition in Hillsborough Castle which is famously known for its peace talks with Northern Irelands politicians and one of the main spots were royalty stays when they are visiting the province. Anyway they asked if I would like to work along side the Princes Trust as it’s main representative for the exhibition. I approached them months before applying for a grant in order to purchase framing equipment which I got and that was how they were informed of the work that I did. The exhibition took place and I was forwarded a letter which was then put in all copies of the catalogue at the foreword which was shown in each book. It was a great pleasure and was very pleased at the fact that I had been asked to do this especially when I was just starting out as an artist.

17. What did it mean to you to be the youngest person to be granted membership of the Ulster Watercolour Society?

Again I was very pleased to be accepted into the UWS at such an age. I thought it was great as no one else had ever been accepted before and to win an award was even better at the first exhibition I took part in. Although it had its downfalls too; I remember looking at one of my paintings with my dad and someone coming up to me and saying your dads a great artist. I just went along with it and hoped maybe I would grow some facial hair next week to look a bit older. Still hasn’t happened. However it is great being the first youngest member and now they have started taking younger members on now every year.

18. What music do you listen to?

I listen all sorts of different music. I particularly like music with big beats that has element of ambience and is more instrumental than vocal throughout. Some of the beat stuff I would listen to would be the likes of record label Ninja Tune that represent artists like DJ Shadow who I think is amazing. Other artists like David Holmes who is from Belfast originally but is responsible for a lot of soundtracks you hear on some of the latest movie releases made in Hollywood. Other artists who fall under this genre are like Red Snapper, DJ Food, The Orb, ColdcutMassive Attack and many others. Music with vocals perhaps would the likes of Beth Orton, Gomez, Zero 7Florence and The Machine and a bit of jazz. I can’t stand all that chart music stuff. It’s all crap apart from one or two that slip in there but then again that’s just my opinion. Everyone’s different.

Connor Maguire

19. How did the opportunity to have your work printed and sold on greetings cards come about?

I actually started that up myself. I thought it would be a good idea to get the work into print so as I could get it into mainstream card and craft shops which again acts as a business card in a way and reaching out to the public. I did all the Photoshop work myself after getting the work scanned in by just cleaning up around the edges and am planning on purchasing a giclee printing machine later in the year hopefully. This all cuts down costs but doing these things yourself costs a lot of time which I have less and less of these days.

20. What do you like about the medium of printing?

Unlike giclee printing which is a mechanical process printing digitally takes no effort at all apart from changing the odd ink cartridge which is quite an empty and heartless process. Producing linocuts and woodcuts it’s a completely different feeling that you can’t explain. There is nothing like cutting into a block working in reverse and trying to imagine how it might look finished. By the time you have finished cutting the block its time to ink the block up and put it through the press. I find this extremely exciting with the process of placing the block on the press then laying the paper on top, then you hope to achieve a perfect print but you won’t know until you peel the paper back from the wet block. When you get a good print you feel a sense of achievement and when you get a bad print you feel like shit. It’s that personal and emotional when you are producing prints that have been carved and printed by yourself. Anyone reading this that isn’t familiar with printmaking will be going “get a life mate, how can you get so worked up about making a print”. I can only say I don’t know, I just do and I love it.

21. What motivates you to make art?

Motivation comes and goes. Some days I feel so motivated I can’t put the brushes down and others I can’t even look at one. Again I don’t know why I draw and paint. I just know that I am unhappy, frustrated and a bit lost as to what I am doing. I think I just have to be busy all the time but there are several times when I can find myself looking at a blank page just staring or loosely scribbling because I just cant get started for some reason. Sometimes when I know I have to paint something then I know I have to get started. If I don’t that image or feeling will stay with me for ages so whether it is month or years down the line I know I have to produce something in order to get rid of that. Once it’s painted that feeling, curiosity or image is gone and it feels good. Sounds a bit odd and weird but that’s the best way I can explain it.

Connor Maguire

22. Finally, thank you for taking the time to answer the questions, is their anything you would like to add?

Mmmmmmmmm I can’t really think of anything. Only thing is that im going to be painting for as long as I can. I’m pretty lucky im able to make money at it and if I wasn’t able to then I would still be doing the same thing anyway. For me painting is just a way of life. 

Name: Connor Maguire
Website: www.connormaguire.com
Contact: art@connormaguire.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Ola! Could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where your from?
Hello! My name is Gavin Strange and I’m originally from Leicester, in the midlands but I now call Bristol home, and I wouldn’t wanna be anywhere else!
2. How did you come up with the name Jam Factory? 
Haha, well, I desperately wanted a ‘cool’ alter ego when I was first starting out, trying to do my own thing in my own time. I racked and racked my brains but couldn’t think of anything. My boss at the time suggested I register a domain name to start playing online, putting my work online so I just randomly searched for “Jam… Factory” - the domain name was available and that was that!
3. What kind of creative endeavours did you get up to whilst in Leicester? 
A bit of everything! mostly web design and graphic design but also filming & editing skate videos, learning how to paint and experiment with photography. I liked to dabble in a bit of everything, whatever I could get my hands on!




4. Where did you learn your skills as a graphic/ web designer? 
I studied Graphic Design at my local college back home in Leicester but then I joined a small design agency soon after (I didnt go to Uni) where I was taught the ways of being a Web designer. In my own time I practised photography, video editing, painting and everything in between. I just kept on learning as much as I can in my own time and that’s pretty much what I’ve been doing ever since!
5. When did you first get into making stuff? 
I’ve always doodled but have always been rubbish at making stuff with my hands. I started trying to figure out how to paint when I was about 18 and am still figuring it out now. I can’t paint in the traditional sense, I just draw monsters and creatures really, nothing special. I’m incredibly impatient and if it doesn’t start looking how I imagine, I get frustrated pretty quickly! It’s only in these last few years, living with artist Richt, that I’ve learnt alot about techniques and got a bit better.

6. How did you land the job as senior designer at Aardman?
Luck! I was freelance for 4 years, working under the alias of JamFactory. I worked in Leicester and then moved to Bristol, where I signed up to the local media network “Bristol Media”. I’m glad I did, as 4 weeks later I had an email drop in my inbox with the subject “Hello from Aardman!” - I was offered some freelance work on a project for Channel4, which lasted 6 months. Just as the project was coming to an end the position of Senior Designer came up and I got the job. That was nearly 3 years ago now and I’ve never looked back, it’s a dream job!
7. What’s an average day at Aardman like? 
Start the day with a tea. Check my schedule for what I’m doing for the day. Have a chat with the producer and then get on with it. Fire up Photoshop, illustrator & Spotify, pop my headphones on and I’m away! Stop regularly to have tea and a natter about something silly. Basically, I colour in all day long and drink lots of tea and listen to lot of music to help me do it!
8. What’s your favourite type of tea?
Clipper Organic Fair Trade tea. Not only is it good for you, its good for the earth and the packaging is beautiful!
9. What interests you in fixed gear bikes, is it the simplicity? 
Yeap, the sheer simplicity of the machine and the aesthetic. I love that there are absolutely no unnecessary parts on it, no clunky extra clips or bits or anything like that, just pure streamlined componants. I also love the freedom you have to really make it your own too, there’s an infinite number of ways you can stylise your ride and I love that!
10. What kind of stuff goes on in Bristol for the fixed gear scene?
The Bristol scene is really healthy, full of a huge variety of people of all ages, backgrounds and interests, all coming together just because they love riding. No bullshit, no cliques, just people with a common interest!

11. When did you get involved in skateboarding? 
I was a late starter with skating, I didnt start until I was about 18 which is the reason I never progressed to be any good! I still loved it though but got too attached and would get really frustrated when I couldnt learn a trick. I lost count of the number of boards I snapped because I got mad with myself! I skated until I was about 25 then got into riding my bike, which felt more rewarding and had the dual purpose of being transport (you can’t really skate up the hills of Bristol!)
12. Who is Shirley Creamhorn? 
She’s a vinyl toy of mine, a partnership with Columbian sculptor Alex Avelino who brought my sketch to life! The name actually comes from a good friend of mine back in Leicester, who I worked with when I was a wee 17 year old as a junior designer. Not sure how but my friend Andy gave me the alter ego of ‘Shirley Creamhorn’ and it’s stuck, so I decided to use that name and bring Shirley to life!
13. How did you get involved with Crazylabel? 
I just happened to send them an email! A friend online recommended I contact them, as they thought my monsters would be up their alley - so I gave it a shot and just dropped them an email, saying I love what they do and I’d love to perhaps make a toy. They got back to me the same day, said they liked my stuff and lets do it, lets make a toy. I couldnt believe it happened so quick - it was definitely right place, right time!




14. What have you enjoyed about working on Droplets?
Everything! Being involved with so many talented and creative people for the launch of the 2nd series was fantastic. I was overwhelmed by the sheer kindness of so many folk who helped me out in so many ways for the big launch, that was really humbling.
15. What are the plans for Boikzmoind? 
To get it finished!! I’m recording interviews at the moment with riders from the scene of all different backgrounds, which will provide the backbone of the film, being the narrative that takes you through. I’m hoping to get it finished by Spring/Summer next year and released online for free as well as producing a lovely digital hardcopy complete with photobook!




16. What makes Bristol a good place to take photographs? 
It’s just such a beautiful City! From the Georgian architecture to Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s Suspension Bridge and SS Great Britain, there’s all sorts of things to take photographs of and always something new to find!
17. What’s your favourite lens to shoot with? 
Hmmmm, either my 50mm f1.8 prime lens which gives a lovely short depth of field that makes everything very filmic, or my Sigma Fisheye which gives everything a distinctive look. They have their different uses though too, fisheye is great for parties and things like that, where you can get lots of people in and capture the spirit of the night whereas the 1.8 lens is a lot more ‘serious’
18. How has having your own website benefited your freelance work? 
Just simply being able to get my work out there, available for all to see. I’ve had my site online (I just checked this) for nearly 10 years now (9 years 9 months!) and its enabled me to keep up as the internet world emerged and get my stuff out there!
19. Who are some of your favourite artists? 
The list seems to change almost daily but my current favourites: McBess, Dieter Rams, Mark Ryden, Another Example, Mike Giant, Matthew Lyons, JP Vine to name but a few!




20. You’ve done talks at Apple stores, tell us how this came about? 
A good friend of mine, Jon McGovern, works at the Apple Store in Birmingham and one day he called me up and suggested I do a talk about my work. I was honoured, I’d done some small scale talks but jumped at the chance and absolutely loved it, that lead to me taking the same talk to the Leicester, Bristol and flagship London Regent Street store! I did a 2nd talk about Droplets earlier this year at the Regent Street store again and would like to continue doing them next year. Im working on my own iPad/iPhone game at the moment so I’d like to do a talk about that!
21. I bet you were really stoked to be featured in some top design magazines!?
Yeah definitely, it’s a real honour to be in magazines and I’m very grateful to the ones that have featured my work!
22. Why did you decide to create the collaborative group Xynthetic? 
Well, noone had asked me to be in their ‘crew’, so I thought I would start my own! It was me and my good friends who work I really admired and it all went from there. It’s gone quiet a bit now, because we’re all grown up and everyone’s very busy (and I let the domain name expire by accident) but I hope to kick start it again in the new year!




23. What kind of feedback did you get from the Anyforty t-shirt collaboration?
Good feedback, which was nice! I’m friends with Al (Wardle, the man behind AnyForty) because he used to be Art Editor of Computer Arts Projects magazine and I’ve worked with him quite alot over the years on various illustrations for the mag and even a cover illy too, so it was nice that he asked me to create something for the AnyForty family! We’re going to work together again next year on something new for the brand too!
24. Do you see any of your products becoming more than a hobby? 
I dont know really, I’m not sure where things like Shirley Creamhorn, Droplets and t-shirts etc could lead me. I certainly couldnt live off them alone and wouldnt want to try but you never know where things may lead. If there’s anything I’ve learnt then you never know whats around the corner and what opportunities will arise!
25. What kind of tunes are you into? 
A bit of just about everything! From Metal to Motown, Underground hip-hop to old-school dance music, full-on orchesta’s to acoustic singer songwriters, I like most stuff except everything in the charts, because that’s just all a pile of shit :)

26. What projects have you got planned for the near future? 
First, I want to complete my bike film ‘Boikzmoind’ because that’s a big project I need to focus on and really want to do it right. I’ve got alot of ideas scribbled down in my sketchbook that I’d like to bring to life and a few wee secret projects on the boil, so my 2011 will be pretty busy im sure of it :)
27. Finally thanks so much for taking the time to answer the questions! Is their anything you’d like to add? 
I’ll leave you on a fantastic quote I heard whilst watching a talk by the great comedic genius John Cleese, who simply said “We do not get ideas from our laptops”.
To play the awesome 8-bit Droplet game click, HERE.
Name: Gavin StrangeWebsite: www.jam-factory.comContact: gav@jam-factory.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Ola! Could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where your from?

Hello! My name is Gavin Strange and I’m originally from Leicester, in the midlands but I now call Bristol home, and I wouldn’t wanna be anywhere else!

2. How did you come up with the name Jam Factory?

Haha, well, I desperately wanted a ‘cool’ alter ego when I was first starting out, trying to do my own thing in my own time. I racked and racked my brains but couldn’t think of anything. My boss at the time suggested I register a domain name to start playing online, putting my work online so I just randomly searched for “Jam… Factory” - the domain name was available and that was that!

3. What kind of creative endeavours did you get up to whilst in Leicester?

A bit of everything! mostly web design and graphic design but also filming & editing skate videos, learning how to paint and experiment with photography. I liked to dabble in a bit of everything, whatever I could get my hands on!

4. Where did you learn your skills as a graphic/ web designer?

I studied Graphic Design at my local college back home in Leicester but then I joined a small design agency soon after (I didnt go to Uni) where I was taught the ways of being a Web designer. In my own time I practised photography, video editing, painting and everything in between. I just kept on learning as much as I can in my own time and that’s pretty much what I’ve been doing ever since!

5. When did you first get into making stuff?

I’ve always doodled but have always been rubbish at making stuff with my hands. I started trying to figure out how to paint when I was about 18 and am still figuring it out now. I can’t paint in the traditional sense, I just draw monsters and creatures really, nothing special. I’m incredibly impatient and if it doesn’t start looking how I imagine, I get frustrated pretty quickly! It’s only in these last few years, living with artist Richt, that I’ve learnt alot about techniques and got a bit better.

Jam Factory

6. How did you land the job as senior designer at Aardman?

Luck! I was freelance for 4 years, working under the alias of JamFactory. I worked in Leicester and then moved to Bristol, where I signed up to the local media network “Bristol Media”. I’m glad I did, as 4 weeks later I had an email drop in my inbox with the subject “Hello from Aardman!” - I was offered some freelance work on a project for Channel4, which lasted 6 months. Just as the project was coming to an end the position of Senior Designer came up and I got the job. That was nearly 3 years ago now and I’ve never looked back, it’s a dream job!

7. What’s an average day at Aardman like? 

Start the day with a tea. Check my schedule for what I’m doing for the day. Have a chat with the producer and then get on with it. Fire up Photoshop, illustrator & Spotify, pop my headphones on and I’m away! Stop regularly to have tea and a natter about something silly. Basically, I colour in all day long and drink lots of tea and listen to lot of music to help me do it!

8. What’s your favourite type of tea?

Clipper Organic Fair Trade tea. Not only is it good for you, its good for the earth and the packaging is beautiful!

9. What interests you in fixed gear bikes, is it the simplicity?

Yeap, the sheer simplicity of the machine and the aesthetic. I love that there are absolutely no unnecessary parts on it, no clunky extra clips or bits or anything like that, just pure streamlined componants. I also love the freedom you have to really make it your own too, there’s an infinite number of ways you can stylise your ride and I love that!

10. What kind of stuff goes on in Bristol for the fixed gear scene?

The Bristol scene is really healthy, full of a huge variety of people of all ages, backgrounds and interests, all coming together just because they love riding. No bullshit, no cliques, just people with a common interest!

Jam Factory

11. When did you get involved in skateboarding?

I was a late starter with skating, I didnt start until I was about 18 which is the reason I never progressed to be any good! I still loved it though but got too attached and would get really frustrated when I couldnt learn a trick. I lost count of the number of boards I snapped because I got mad with myself! I skated until I was about 25 then got into riding my bike, which felt more rewarding and had the dual purpose of being transport (you can’t really skate up the hills of Bristol!)

12. Who is Shirley Creamhorn?

She’s a vinyl toy of mine, a partnership with Columbian sculptor Alex Avelino who brought my sketch to life! The name actually comes from a good friend of mine back in Leicester, who I worked with when I was a wee 17 year old as a junior designer. Not sure how but my friend Andy gave me the alter ego of ‘Shirley Creamhorn’ and it’s stuck, so I decided to use that name and bring Shirley to life!

13. How did you get involved with Crazylabel?

I just happened to send them an email! A friend online recommended I contact them, as they thought my monsters would be up their alley - so I gave it a shot and just dropped them an email, saying I love what they do and I’d love to perhaps make a toy. They got back to me the same day, said they liked my stuff and lets do it, lets make a toy. I couldnt believe it happened so quick - it was definitely right place, right time!

14. What have you enjoyed about working on Droplets?

Everything! Being involved with so many talented and creative people for the launch of the 2nd series was fantastic. I was overwhelmed by the sheer kindness of so many folk who helped me out in so many ways for the big launch, that was really humbling.

15. What are the plans for Boikzmoind?

To get it finished!! I’m recording interviews at the moment with riders from the scene of all different backgrounds, which will provide the backbone of the film, being the narrative that takes you through. I’m hoping to get it finished by Spring/Summer next year and released online for free as well as producing a lovely digital hardcopy complete with photobook!

16. What makes Bristol a good place to take photographs?

It’s just such a beautiful City! From the Georgian architecture to Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s Suspension Bridge and SS Great Britain, there’s all sorts of things to take photographs of and always something new to find!

17. What’s your favourite lens to shoot with?

Hmmmm, either my 50mm f1.8 prime lens which gives a lovely short depth of field that makes everything very filmic, or my Sigma Fisheye which gives everything a distinctive look. They have their different uses though too, fisheye is great for parties and things like that, where you can get lots of people in and capture the spirit of the night whereas the 1.8 lens is a lot more ‘serious’

18. How has having your own website benefited your freelance work?

Just simply being able to get my work out there, available for all to see. I’ve had my site online (I just checked this) for nearly 10 years now (9 years 9 months!) and its enabled me to keep up as the internet world emerged and get my stuff out there!

19. Who are some of your favourite artists?

The list seems to change almost daily but my current favourites: McBess, Dieter Rams, Mark Ryden, Another Example, Mike Giant, Matthew Lyons, JP Vine to name but a few!

20. You’ve done talks at Apple stores, tell us how this came about?

A good friend of mine, Jon McGovern, works at the Apple Store in Birmingham and one day he called me up and suggested I do a talk about my work. I was honoured, I’d done some small scale talks but jumped at the chance and absolutely loved it, that lead to me taking the same talk to the Leicester, Bristol and flagship London Regent Street store! I did a 2nd talk about Droplets earlier this year at the Regent Street store again and would like to continue doing them next year. Im working on my own iPad/iPhone game at the moment so I’d like to do a talk about that!

21. I bet you were really stoked to be featured in some top design magazines!?

Yeah definitely, it’s a real honour to be in magazines and I’m very grateful to the ones that have featured my work!

22. Why did you decide to create the collaborative group Xynthetic?

Well, noone had asked me to be in their ‘crew’, so I thought I would start my own! It was me and my good friends who work I really admired and it all went from there. It’s gone quiet a bit now, because we’re all grown up and everyone’s very busy (and I let the domain name expire by accident) but I hope to kick start it again in the new year!

23. What kind of feedback did you get from the Anyforty t-shirt collaboration?

Good feedback, which was nice! I’m friends with Al (Wardle, the man behind AnyForty) because he used to be Art Editor of Computer Arts Projects magazine and I’ve worked with him quite alot over the years on various illustrations for the mag and even a cover illy too, so it was nice that he asked me to create something for the AnyForty family! We’re going to work together again next year on something new for the brand too!

24. Do you see any of your products becoming more than a hobby?

I dont know really, I’m not sure where things like Shirley Creamhorn, Droplets and t-shirts etc could lead me. I certainly couldnt live off them alone and wouldnt want to try but you never know where things may lead. If there’s anything I’ve learnt then you never know whats around the corner and what opportunities will arise!

25. What kind of tunes are you into?

A bit of just about everything! From Metal to Motown, Underground hip-hop to old-school dance music, full-on orchesta’s to acoustic singer songwriters, I like most stuff except everything in the charts, because that’s just all a pile of shit :)

Jam Factory

26. What projects have you got planned for the near future?

First, I want to complete my bike film ‘Boikzmoind’ because that’s a big project I need to focus on and really want to do it right. I’ve got alot of ideas scribbled down in my sketchbook that I’d like to bring to life and a few wee secret projects on the boil, so my 2011 will be pretty busy im sure of it :)

27. Finally thanks so much for taking the time to answer the questions! Is their anything you’d like to add?

I’ll leave you on a fantastic quote I heard whilst watching a talk by the great comedic genius John Cleese, who simply said “We do not get ideas from our laptops”.

To play the awesome 8-bit Droplet game click, HERE.

Name: Gavin Strange
Website: www.jam-factory.com
Contact: 
gav@jam-factory.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Hello, could you kindly introduce yourself?
Cassy Giacci.2. Where abouts do you live?
New York city. I move around a lot so keeping it general is best, ha!
3. Why did you choose to live there?
A lot of reasons made it actually happen, but I kinda always wanted to anyway.4. When did you start painting?
Before I can remember, stopped in my teens, started again in my 20’s.5. Was art like an escape for you?
I don’t know. Not really. Sort of the opposite. It feels more of a real natural thing than a run-n’hide-to.
6. What kind of reactions do you get when you show people your artwork?
Usually positive in some way, even if it’s not their taste. Different people see different things in them too, which is cool, because I know what I made (sort of) and to see others see this instead of that is pretty interesting.7. What do you like about working through the night?
It’s like being in a meditative sort of state so everything seems to just flow. There seem to be less distractions and other things to think about doing. You’re sort of like- hey, it’s late- i could be sleeping, or out, but I’m doing this so let’s do it.8. Do you listen to music when your working?
Almost always. That or, (not as often) silence or TV.
9. What interests you in tattoos? Is their any meaning behind the ones that you have?
I’m not as interested in them as I used to be. Don’t even notice they’re there any more. I guess the feel of getting one is pretty all right. There’s some meaning behind some of them. Mostly the picture or word says it.10. When you look at your own work, what influences can you see in it?
None of them were too thought out. All of them were first drawn up by me.11. Do you think as a painter you’ve found your place in the world?
I’m not sure what my place in the world is but I know I like to paint and draw, whether it finds me a spot in the world or not. My stuff’s in it now (the world), even if it’s mostly in my apartment. So I guess it’s got a spot in the world…

12. Do you exhibit your work?
Yes, as often as possible. I’d really like to show it at shows (music) and “perform”, myself (live painting), more than anything, though.13. When your painting, does your imagination become your reality?
Imagination is always sort of reality (I think), because there’s some subconscious or known cause for it, or goal because of it.14. Have you ever thought about what you want your artwork to do, like to create a certain reaction? 
No. I might think about it after it’s started or the idea came up. 15. Do you believe in the parallel universe theory? If so, do you reckon that the worlds in your paintings and subconsciousness actually exist?
I don’t know for sure what to believe in anything.
16. How do you keep creative on a daily basis?
I try to work on something, even if it’s just for a minute, everyday.
17. Could you describe one dream that’s always stuck with you?
Me and my brother and sister had this hide-out in a closet around Christmas time which we’d go through a hole in the back of the wall of the closet that was covered by a blue blanket. It wasn’t very big but it was a hiding spot and we’d just sit in it giggling. The dream was recurring and i remember more details, but that’s it, basically, and it would have been cool to have that hide out in every home we had growing up. If i worked in 3d I’d like to make it. Maybe I will.
18. What kind of things directly inspire you to want to start a new painting or project?
It depends. Most of the time it just happens. Sometimes it’s new music. Other times it’s just seeing another person who’s motivated and inspired.
19. Finally thank you for taking the time to answer these questions! Is their anything you’d like to add?
Nope. :) Thank you!
Name: Cassy GiacciFilm: DocumentaryFacebook: Cassy Giacci
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Hello, could you kindly introduce yourself?

Cassy Giacci.

2. Where abouts do you live?

New York city. I move around a lot so keeping it general is best, ha!

Cassy Giacci

3. Why did you choose to live there?

A lot of reasons made it actually happen, but I kinda always wanted to anyway.

4. When did you start painting?

Before I can remember, stopped in my teens, started again in my 20’s.

5. Was art like an escape for you?

I don’t know. Not really. Sort of the opposite. It feels more of a real natural thing than a run-n’hide-to.

Cassy Giacci

6. What kind of reactions do you get when you show people your artwork?

Usually positive in some way, even if it’s not their taste. Different people see different things in them too, which is cool, because I know what I made (sort of) and to see others see this instead of that is pretty interesting.

7. What do you like about working through the night?

It’s like being in a meditative sort of state so everything seems to just flow. There seem to be less distractions and other things to think about doing. You’re sort of like- hey, it’s late- i could be sleeping, or out, but I’m doing this so let’s do it.

8. Do you listen to music when your working?

Almost always. That or, (not as often) silence or TV.

Cassy Giacci

9. What interests you in tattoos? Is their any meaning behind the ones that you have?

I’m not as interested in them as I used to be. Don’t even notice they’re there any more. I guess the feel of getting one is pretty all right. There’s some meaning behind some of them. Mostly the 
picture or word says it.

10. When you look at your own work, what influences can you see in it?

None of them were too thought out. All of them were first drawn up by me.

11. Do you think as a painter you’ve found your place in the world?

I’m not sure what my place in the world is but I know I like to paint and draw, whether it finds me a spot in the world or not. My stuff’s in it now (the world), even if it’s mostly in my apartment. So I guess it’s got a spot in the world…

Cassy Giacci

12. Do you exhibit your work?

Yes, as often as possible. I’d really like to show it at shows (music) and “perform”, myself (live painting), more than anything, though.

13. When your painting, does your imagination become your reality?

Imagination is always sort of reality (I think), because there’s some subconscious or known cause for it, or goal because of it.

14. Have you ever thought about what you want your artwork to do, like to create a certain reaction? 

No. I might think about it after it’s started or the idea came up.
 
15. Do you believe in the parallel universe theory? If so, do you reckon that the worlds in your paintings and subconsciousness actually exist?

I don’t know for sure what to believe in anything.

Cassy Giacci

16. How do you keep creative on a daily basis?

I try to work on something, even if it’s just for a minute, everyday.

17. Could you describe one dream that’s always stuck with you?

Me and my brother and sister had this hide-out in a closet around Christmas time which we’d go through a hole in the back of the wall of the closet that was covered by a blue blanket. It wasn’t very big but it was a hiding spot and we’d just sit in it giggling. The dream was recurring and i remember more details, but that’s it, basically, and it would have been cool to have that hide out in every home we had growing up. If i worked in 3d I’d like to make it. Maybe I will.

18. What kind of things directly inspire you to want to start a new painting or project?

It depends. Most of the time it just happens. Sometimes it’s new music. Other times it’s just seeing another person who’s motivated and inspired.

Cassy Giacci

19. Finally thank you for taking the time to answer these questions! Is their anything you’d like to add?

Nope. :) Thank you!

Name: Cassy Giacci
Film: Documentary
Facebook: Cassy Giacci

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Firstly, introduce yourself, what’s your name and where about’s are you from?
Alo, My name is jA!RU, I come from a mixed background of Ghanian and Egyptian/Lebonese.
2. What first got you into the world of art and graphic design?
Graphic design got into me as a kid, my parents put an old computer in my room that happened to have Paint Shop Pro on it. I was already into drawing comics and storyboards so once I found out you could create these rich designs on the computer I was all in. I did a couple flyers around age 16 that earned me more than I made in 2 weeks at my job! Then I pleaded with a guy to design his website that eventually won me a laptop, ipod, and a free macromedia suite PLUS mucho swagger…there was no turning back then. Initially the allure of graphic design was its ability to help me express so many poetic and abstract concepts I wrestled with. It gave me the freedom to experiment and also, if I played my cards right, I could work for myself at a young age which meant “rock star”
3. Your work is very professional looking, where did you learn your skills of the trade?
For the most part I am self-taught, learning a lot from experimenting and online design communities. After a few years doing it on my own I attended a local art school to learn how to make my images interactive and create websites, motion graphics, and other design stuff.
4. What influences your work?
So many things and nothing in particular. Life, love in its abundance or its sparsity, pain, delight, current events, phrases…the root meanings of words. Poetry. There are a range of emotions that we all toss around on a daily basis. I try to tap into them and see what comes out.

5. Where does the name “Jairu" originate from?
…life has presented me with a lot of battles, figuratively and literally… my name is a statement of faith to anything that opposes me, it means “victorious” and  “fire”.
6. Are you working on any projects at the moment?
At the moment I’m working on evolving my style for the most part, I really want to take it to the next level. I’m taking on projects that will allow me to do that, but nothing big at the moment. A lot of personal  experimental projects.
7. If you where trapped on an island what would you do to escape?
Rip off my shirt, let my long hair down and stand at the shore clutching a torch set ablaze by a star bound to its tip haha, blow into my conch shell necklace precisely at midnight  and summon a leviathan to take me to me to the deep, where there’s a legendary city of lights that I can vacation at for a while.
8. Can you tell me what interests you?
Jesus Christ, Cultures, people, all kinds, mythology, graffiti, romance and the nuances of how people relate, history, languages and root meanings, antiquity, anatomy, ancient architecture, folklore…just to name a few.
9. Does your religion inspire you to make the art that you do?
I don’t have a religion, I have a relationship with my Creator and its awe inspiring. That awe is a part of me like air and in creating art it inspires me to explore concepts that will bring hope & inspiration to observers even if they don’t agree.
10. Have you ever had an awe inspiring moment that has changed your life?
Yeah…many, August 11th 2006 I narrowly escaped a terrorist attack that planned to blow up 8 planes headed from Heathrow Airport in London to the U.S. I was in Africa and my sister and I were praying for the safety of the flight after feeling quite disturbed. That night the terrorists were captured and the attacks were stopped before leaving the next morning.
11. Is their anyone you would like to work with right now!?
Id like to work with a few designers on some collaborations, none specific at the moment but there are alot of them. Alot of good work being done today.
12. I’ve seen that you designed the website for Mr J. Medeiros (that looks awesome!). How did this come about?
I bought his first CD and loved it. The song entitled “Constance" really moved me so I wanted to invest in him as he did in me with that song. I hit him up and he agreed immediately which was awesome and after some talks with him and listening to the album, we identified a look that really mirrored the atmosphere and texture of the music. Interesting project, he is a really talented lyricist and gifted musician.

13. What kind of music does the Jairu listen too?
I listen to a lot of Holy Hip-Hop, Lecrae, Trip Lee, Conviction, Tedashii, Dwayne Tryumf. I mix it up with some Adele, Fiest, Mr. J. Medieros, some new hip-hop classical and some japanese jazz, some underground, a pinch of techno (nobody know tho so shhhh). I like some latin music, spanish guitar, merengue, bachata, salsa and some capoeira toques.
14. If you look out of your window what can you see?
I can see…so i’m thankful.
15. If given the chance, would you rather travel back in time, or go to a parallel universe?
Neither, have you seen the news!?! these are exciting times. I know im supposed to be here for this moment and that is the chance I’ve been given. One day I will be taken out of this world, out of time and will be with Him. Wherever that is, i want to go there.
16. A lot of your work is on interfacelift.com, what made you want to design wallpapers?
They are immersive… wallpapers take over peoples computers and every time they close their windows to reveal the desktop they are in my world. What an honor that someone would splash, what is essentially my expressions, all over their screen!?! Though with the new voting system its harder to get accepted so i may start posting elsewhere.

17. When can we expect more work from yourself?
hopefully early next year! keep checking with my flickr.
18. Do you experiment with any other art mediums such as paint or graffiti?
Mainly graffiti and photography….some writing.
19. And finally, where do you see yourself and your work going in the near future?
Packing up and journeying to the center of the earth!
Name: The JairuWebsite: jairu.comContact: jairu@jairu.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Firstly, introduce yourself, what’s your name and where about’s are you from?

Alo, My name is jA!RU, I come from a mixed background of Ghanian and Egyptian/Lebonese.

2. What first got you into the world of art and graphic design?

Graphic design got into me as a kid, my parents put an old computer in my room that happened to have Paint Shop Pro on it. I was already into drawing comics and storyboards so once I found out you could create these rich designs on the computer I was all in. I did a couple flyers around age 16 that earned me more than I made in 2 weeks at my job! Then I pleaded with a guy to design his website that eventually won me a laptop, ipod, and a free macromedia suite PLUS mucho swagger…there was no turning back then. Initially the allure of graphic design was its ability to help me express so many poetic and abstract concepts I wrestled with. It gave me the freedom to experiment and also, if I played my cards right, I could work for myself at a young age which meant “rock star”

3. Your work is very professional looking, where did you learn your skills of the trade?

For the most part I am self-taught, learning a lot from experimenting and online design communities. After a few years doing it on my own I attended a local art school to learn how to make my images interactive and create websites, motion graphics, and other design stuff.

4. What influences your work?

So many things and nothing in particular. Life, love in its abundance or its sparsity, pain, delight, current events, phrases…the root meanings of words. Poetry. There are a range of emotions that we all toss around on a daily basis. I try to tap into them and see what comes out.

Celeste

5. Where does the name “Jairu" originate from?

…life has presented me with a lot of battles, figuratively and literally… my name is a statement of faith to anything that opposes me, it means “victorious” and  “fire”.

6. Are you working on any projects at the moment?

At the moment I’m working on evolving my style for the most part, I really want to take it to the next level. I’m taking on projects that will allow me to do that, but nothing big at the moment. A lot of personal  experimental projects.

7. If you where trapped on an island what would you do to escape?

Rip off my shirt, let my long hair down and stand at the shore clutching a torch set ablaze by a star bound to its tip haha, blow into my conch shell necklace precisely at midnight  and summon a leviathan to take me to me to the deep, where there’s a legendary city of lights that I can vacation at for a while.

8. Can you tell me what interests you?

Jesus Christ, Cultures, people, all kinds, mythologygraffiti, romance and the nuances of how people relate, history, languages and root meanings, antiquity, anatomy, ancient architecture, folklore…just to name a few.

Play Kiss

9. Does your religion inspire you to make the art that you do?

I don’t have a religion, I have a relationship with my Creator and its awe inspiring. That awe is a part of me like air and in creating art it inspires me to explore concepts that will bring hope & inspiration to observers even if they don’t agree.

10. Have you ever had an awe inspiring moment that has changed your life?

Yeah…many, August 11th 2006 I narrowly escaped a terrorist attack that planned to blow up 8 planes headed from Heathrow Airport in London to the U.S. I was in Africa and my sister and I were praying for the safety of the flight after feeling quite disturbed. That night the terrorists were captured and the attacks were stopped before leaving the next morning.

11. Is their anyone you would like to work with right now!?

Id like to work with a few designers on some collaborations, none specific at the moment but there are alot of them. Alot of good work being done today.

12. I’ve seen that you designed the website for Mr J. Medeiros (that looks awesome!). How did this come about?

I bought his first CD and loved it. The song entitled “Constance" really moved me so I wanted to invest in him as he did in me with that song. I hit him up and he agreed immediately which was awesome and after some talks with him and listening to the album, we identified a look that really mirrored the atmosphere and texture of the music. Interesting project, he is a really talented lyricist and gifted musician.

Jairu

13. What kind of music does the Jairu listen too?

I listen to a lot of Holy Hip-Hop, Lecrae, Trip Lee, Conviction, Tedashii, Dwayne Tryumf. I mix it up with some Adele, Fiest, Mr. J. Medieros, some new hip-hop classical and some japanese jazz, some underground, a pinch of techno (nobody know tho so shhhh). I like some latin music, spanish guitar, merengue, bachata, salsa and some capoeira toques.

14. If you look out of your window what can you see?

I can see…so i’m thankful.

15. If given the chance, would you rather travel back in time, or go to a parallel universe?

Neither, have you seen the news!?! these are exciting times. I know im supposed to be here for this moment and that is the chance I’ve been given. One day I will be taken out of this world, out of time and will be with Him. Wherever that is, i want to go there.

16. A lot of your work is on interfacelift.com, what made you want to design wallpapers?

They are immersive… wallpapers take over peoples computers and every time they close their windows to reveal the desktop they are in my world. What an honor that someone would splash, what is essentially my expressions, all over their screen!?! Though with the new voting system its harder to get accepted so i may start posting elsewhere.

Jairu

17. When can we expect more work from yourself?

hopefully early next year! keep checking with my flickr.

18. Do you experiment with any other art mediums such as paint or graffiti?

Mainly graffiti and photography….some writing.

19. And finally, where do you see yourself and your work going in the near future?

Packing up and journeying to the center of the earth!

Name: The Jairu
Website: jairu.com
Contact: jairu@jairu.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Firstly, introduce yourself, what’s your name and where abouts are you from?
Hi, my name is Kosuke Masuda and my friends call me Ko. I’m from Yokohama Japan. I was born in my family’s temple and I grew up there. I am Buddhist monk.
2. How did you start your career as an artist? 
I don’t remember, but I believe everyone is an artist. I guess I started since I was born?!? When my one year old daughter held a pen and scratched on paper, lines were left. Do you called it art? I call it art. It’s just to notice that everything is art, we are in it and we are it.
3. Where did you go to learn your skills? 
I went to the Elam school of Fine Art at the Auckland University in New Zealand. I got a BFA but my skills are self taught. When I was a student I did all the kind of styles of painting, sculpture, prints and photographs that I wanted. Teachers always told me “stick with one thing”, but I did not.
4. A lot of your work is very practical, do you enjoy knowing that people can enjoy your work physically as well as visually? 
Of course, I enjoy both ways. I want  my works to be enjoyed physically as well as visually.
5. You have worked on helmets, bike parts, surfboards and office walls. What other mediums have you experimented with?
Bags, glasses and stone.
6. What artists did you admire when you were growing up? 
Too many.
7. Do you prefer to be in shoes or have nothing on your feet? 
I like bare foot. When I was in New Zealand, it’s not that strange to walk around on the streets with nothing on your feet .
8. What made you want to start customising bike parts as art?
At a time in 2006 I was engraving on clear acrylic boxes. One of them was in my friend’s bar. Coincidently my friend asked me “why don’t you engrave a handle?”, so I did. It was easy. It seemed that all I did, was just change the surface where I was projecting or expressing my vision of art .
9. What sort of reactions do you get when people see your work for the first time?
One interesting reaction was from a girl, she said “masculine”. Most people ask me “how”.
(Photograph by Yohei Mortia)
10. In November 2009 you exhibited at the Bridgestone Cycle art exhibition what happened? 
It went well. I didn’t have much time to make work (about a week) but I don’t take that much time to make my works anyway so it was OK. I painted on 2 new BS bike’s, 2 paintings and showed 3 other paintings and 2 screen prints. I also showed all of my bike parts.
11. In 2004 you trained as a Shingon Buddhist at the top of a mountain. What did you learn from this experience and how has it effected your art? 
Training is only for yourself. I learned so many things and I guess it changed my life, and at the same time, I understand this life that we were given. Everyone has something to do in this life. I learned visible and invisible. I learned of the nature of life.
12. Is any of your work out on exhibition at the moment? 
Not at the moment, but when the right time comes, it’s on.
13. What was it like working in a studio apartment, whilst at Auckland University with Marc Blake? Was this a creative time for you both? 
Yes, it was my best creative time of my life. It felt like freedom of mind. Everyday was creative. One day, we got a yellow pages and randomly picked out a person and a few art galleries to send a letter to. The card said something like “we are poor. please help us.”. I would draw the back side of a monkey with a red ass and a banana. Of course, no reply. Anyway, we always stimulate each others art. He is in Australia now so we email often.
14. Have you done any collaborations recently? 
Not since Bridgestone. I am planning a collaboration with my wife, she is a photographer and an artist.
15. You have painted a surfboards (very beautifully). What made you want to use a surfboard as a canvas? 
A few questions back you said “physically as well as visually”, that’s quite important. I rarely do surf but I like the surfboard itself, it’s same as bike parts. A form of beauty. I like it. Stretched canvas is nice, but surfboards are more yummy and smooth.
16. Does the seas energy and presence have a place in your heart? 
Yes.
(Portrait of Kosuke Masuda by Marc Blake)
17. If you could be reincarnated as any living thing, what would you be/ why? 
I wish I could be reincarnated as a non living that is Enlightenment. But I guess I would have to be reincarnated as a human again to do more things in this life. The thing is it’s not for myself it’s for others.
18. Do you have any advice for artists who want to live off their art? 
Live off their art… I want to advise that the important thing is “live with their art”. It doesn’t need a goal as a result. But whatever you do in this life is part of art, life is art and art is life. Once you notice that and believe that you can live with art. Not live off it.
19. And finally, what are your main focuses for the near future? 
Right now, I’ve got a cute one year old daughter. This is my best creation of this life and I want to focus on her mainly. Then I will know the new focuses coming for the future.
Name: Kosuke MasudaWebsite: ko5.jpContact: ko5@heteml.jp
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Firstly, introduce yourself, what’s your name and where abouts are you from?

Hi, my name is Kosuke Masuda and my friends call me Ko. I’m from Yokohama Japan. I was born in my family’s temple and I grew up there. I am Buddhist monk.

2. How did you start your career as an artist?

I don’t remember, but I believe everyone is an artist. I guess I started since I was born?!? When my one year old daughter held a pen and scratched on paper, lines were left. Do you called it art? I call it art. It’s just to notice that everything is art, we are in it and we are it.

3. Where did you go to learn your skills?

I went to the Elam school of Fine Art at the Auckland University in New Zealand. I got a BFA but my skills are self taught. When I was a student I did all the kind of styles of painting, sculpture, prints and photographs that I wanted. Teachers always told me “stick with one thing”, but I did not.

4. A lot of your work is very practical, do you enjoy knowing that people can enjoy your work physically as well as visually?

Of course, I enjoy both ways. I want my works to be enjoyed physically as well as visually.

5. You have worked on helmets, bike parts, surfboards and office walls. What other mediums have you experimented with?

Bags, glasses and stone.

6. What artists did you admire when you were growing up?

Too many.

7. Do you prefer to be in shoes or have nothing on your feet?

I like bare foot. When I was in New Zealand, it’s not that strange to walk around on the streets with nothing on your feet .

8. What made you want to start customising bike parts as art?

At a time in 2006 I was engraving on clear acrylic boxes. One of them was in my friend’s bar. Coincidently my friend asked me “why don’t you engrave a handle?”, so I did. It was easy. It seemed that all I did, was just change the surface where I was projecting or expressing my vision of art .

9. What sort of reactions do you get when people see your work for the first time?

One interesting reaction was from a girl, she said “masculine”. Most people ask me “how”.

(Photograph by Yohei Mortia)

10. In November 2009 you exhibited at the Bridgestone Cycle art exhibition what happened?

It went well. I didn’t have much time to make work (about a week) but I don’t take that much time to make my works anyway so it was OK. I painted on 2 new BS bike’s, 2 paintings and showed 3 other paintings and 2 screen prints. I also showed all of my bike parts.

11. In 2004 you trained as a Shingon Buddhist at the top of a mountain. What did you learn from this experience and how has it effected your art?

Training is only for yourself. I learned so many things and I guess it changed my life, and at the same time, I understand this life that we were given. Everyone has something to do in this life. I learned visible and invisible. I learned of the nature of life.

12. Is any of your work out on exhibition at the moment?

Not at the moment, but when the right time comes, it’s on.

13. What was it like working in a studio apartment, whilst at Auckland University with Marc Blake? Was this a creative time for you both?

Yes, it was my best creative time of my life. It felt like freedom of mind. Everyday was creative. One day, we got a yellow pages and randomly picked out a person and a few art galleries to send a letter to. The card said something like “we are poor. please help us.”. I would draw the back side of a monkey with a red ass and a banana. Of course, no reply. Anyway, we always stimulate each others art. He is in Australia now so we email often.

14. Have you done any collaborations recently?

Not since Bridgestone. I am planning a collaboration with my wife, she is a photographer and an artist.

15. You have painted a surfboards (very beautifully). What made you want to use a surfboard as a canvas?

A few questions back you said “physically as well as visually”, that’s quite important. I rarely do surf but I like the surfboard itself, it’s same as bike parts. A form of beauty. I like it. Stretched canvas is nice, but surfboards are more yummy and smooth.

16. Does the seas energy and presence have a place in your heart?

Yes.

(Portrait of Kosuke Masuda by Marc Blake)

17. If you could be reincarnated as any living thing, what would you be/ why?

I wish I could be reincarnated as a non living that is Enlightenment. But I guess I would have to be reincarnated as a human again to do more things in this life. The thing is it’s not for myself it’s for others.

18. Do you have any advice for artists who want to live off their art?

Live off their art… I want to advise that the important thing is “live with their art”. It doesn’t need a goal as a result. But whatever you do in this life is part of art, life is art and art is life. Once you notice that and believe that you can live with art. Not live off it.

19. And finally, what are your main focuses for the near future?

Right now, I’ve got a cute one year old daughter. This is my best creation of this life and I want to focus on her mainly. Then I will know the new focuses coming for the future.

Name: Kosuke Masuda
Website: ko5.jp
Contact: ko5@heteml.jp

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Could you kindly introduce yourself, what’s your name and where about’s are you living right now!?
My name is Anastasia Van Wingerden, but friends and family mostly call me “Stas” for short.  For most of the year I live in San Francisco, but for the next two months I’m in Carpinteria, California.
2. Why did you start making music?
My love for music started as a young girl.  I sat on the piano bench at home, my short legs swinging and my little fingers experimenting with sounds.  I can give a lot of credit to my elementary and middle schools for encouraging growth and creativity through music.  With any instrument I have played or any songs I have sung, I always find that melodies bring people together and communicate incredible spiritual energy.
3. What’s the inspiration behind your songs?
A lot of my inspiration is spontaneous and oftentimes a flow of consciousness. Reflections of nature, love, death, new life, people, silly moments, and letting go.  Sometimes I have written for certain occasions such as my high school graduation, or the memorial service for my grandmother (the song titled “Maria’s light”).  It’s best for me not to think too hard when I write music… I find that my favorite songs are the ones I write in one sitting and with no particular expectations.




4. I first heard your song “Baby it’s Cold Outside” in a video on Korduroy. What’s your involvement in the surfing scene where you live?
I try to take part in surfing wherever I live.  While I’m going to school in San Francisco, I weasel onto the bus with my board and try to brave Ocean Beach’s cold water and powerful waves.  When I return home to Carpinteria I play at some of the fun little breaks with friends and family, and while visiting my boyfriend’s stomping grounds in Encinitas I appreciate surrounding myself with creative surfers riding interesting surf craft.
5. You also have another song on Korduroy, “Christmas Kookies”. How did you get involved with the Korduroy project?
I am so fortunate to be a part of Korduroy through my boyfriend, Cyrus Sutton, the founder and creator of the site.  I love how it’s a collaboration of artistic minds finding ways to be resourceful in the waves and on land.  Cy and the other video editors are open to a variety of music, and I was happy to create some tunes for some of the clips as well as the film, “Tom’s Creation Plantation.”  It was a treat singing the duet “Baby It’s Cold Outside” with Cyrus and sharing our interests and skills together.
6. Are you working on any other projects with anyone at the moment?
Being a twenty-year-old full time student hasn’t allowed for too many side projects, but I know I will keep the ball rolling with some awesome opportunities in the future.

7. On your myspace you say you are a country girl and a city girl, what are the perks with being both a rural and urban chic?
Being home on my family’s avocado ranch near the mountains and the ocean keeps me rejuvenated, and I am beyond grateful for the foundation it has given me.  I have such an appreciation for natural cultivation when I come home from the city setting.  But San Francisco offers a lifestyle of diversity, color, cultural stimulation, and exposure to a world much larger.
8. If you had to choose, would you rather take an otter or a raccoon for a walk?
Definitely an otter… Because I would have to take him for a swim!
9. What do you like to spend most of your time doing aside from music?
I love getting a little taste of everything… Breathing fresh air through surfing, running, biking, hiking, swimming, and yoga. Keeps me clear and content.  I love cooking and crafting with friends and family, and finding interesting cultural events.  A huge fan of the crazy festivals in San Francisco!
10. You say your a farmers market enthusiast, what makes you get all exited about going to a farmers market?
While I live in Carpinteria I sell help my family’s business by selling our avocados and flowers at the Santa Barbara farmer’s market.  There is something so special about the energy there and the abundance of health and families.  I sought out the one in San Francisco and work at the Ferry Building selling potatoes on Saturdays! Can’t get enough of the delicious food and nurturing community.




11. When you day dream, what are you thinking about 99.9% of the time?
My current daydreams are mostly about an upcoming trip to Chile.  I’ll be living and studying in Valparaiso for five months this year and my mind is swirling with images and anticipation.
12. Who are your favourite musicians?
I have many… but to name a few: Mason Jennings, Xavier Rudd, The Weepies, Jack Johnson, Fleetwood Mac, Billie Holiday, Feist, and Gillian Welsh.
13. Have you made anything with your hands lately?
I just knitted my older brother a green, alpaca beanie.
14. What kind of music are you listening to at the moment?
It’s always a mish mash, but there seems to be a lot of world music in my itunes library… Since I’m studying Spanish, it’s fun to sing along to upbeat Latin songs. I love seeing how cultures can cross over through rhythms, styles, and sounds.
15. Name 3 things you can see right in front of you?
A bowl of persimmons, an unpacked bag from a trip to Guatemala, and some clear looking skies out the window.
16. Do you have any live shows arranged soon?
I’ll be playing open mics and in a few restaurants around Santa Barbara and Carpinteria these next two months.  There is a fun music lounge/restaurant called “Live Culture” where I plan on singing soon.

17. Your a student and an athlete, is their a link their?
No real link… Just keeping my mind and body sane between the studies!
18. Can we expect more songs from you in the not to distant future?
In fact, I recorded a new song called “Satisfied” today.  My friend John Allen accompanied me on his mandolin.  I’ll try to keep them coming.
19. Finally, what do you see yourself doing in 10 minutes!?
Shutting down my computer, and shutting my eyes for a cat nap!
Name: Anastasia Van WingerdenWebsite: www.myspace.com/stasvwContact: stasvw89@hotmail.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Could you kindly introduce yourself, what’s your name and where about’s are you living right now!?

My name is Anastasia Van Wingerden, but friends and family mostly call me “Stas” for short.  For most of the year I live in San Francisco, but for the next two months I’m in Carpinteria, California.

2. Why did you start making music?

My love for music started as a young girl.  I sat on the piano bench at home, my short legs swinging and my little fingers experimenting with sounds.  I can give a lot of credit to my elementary and middle schools for encouraging growth and creativity through music.  With any instrument I have played or any songs I have sung, I always find that melodies bring people together and communicate incredible spiritual energy.

3. What’s the inspiration behind your songs?

A lot of my inspiration is spontaneous and oftentimes a flow of consciousness. Reflections of nature, love, death, new life, people, silly moments, and letting go.  Sometimes I have written for certain occasions such as my high school graduation, or the memorial service for my grandmother (the song titled “Maria’s light”).  It’s best for me not to think too hard when I write music… I find that my favorite songs are the ones I write in one sitting and with no particular expectations.

4. I first heard your song “Baby it’s Cold Outside” in a video on Korduroy. What’s your involvement in the surfing scene where you live?

I try to take part in surfing wherever I live.  While I’m going to school in San Francisco, I weasel onto the bus with my board and try to brave Ocean Beach’s cold water and powerful waves.  When I return home to Carpinteria I play at some of the fun little breaks with friends and family, and while visiting my boyfriend’s stomping grounds in Encinitas I appreciate surrounding myself with creative surfers riding interesting surf craft.

5. You also have another song on Korduroy, “Christmas Kookies”. How did you get involved with the Korduroy project?

I am so fortunate to be a part of Korduroy through my boyfriend, Cyrus Sutton, the founder and creator of the site.  I love how it’s a collaboration of artistic minds finding ways to be resourceful in the waves and on land.  Cy and the other video editors are open to a variety of music, and I was happy to create some tunes for some of the clips as well as the film, “Tom’s Creation Plantation.”  It was a treat singing the duet “Baby It’s Cold Outside” with Cyrus and sharing our interests and skills together.

6. Are you working on any other projects with anyone at the moment?

Being a twenty-year-old full time student hasn’t allowed for too many side projects, but I know I will keep the ball rolling with some awesome opportunities in the future.

Anastasia

7. On your myspace you say you are a country girl and a city girl, what are the perks with being both a rural and urban chic?

Being home on my family’s avocado ranch near the mountains and the ocean keeps me rejuvenated, and I am beyond grateful for the foundation it has given me.  I have such an appreciation for natural cultivation when I come home from the city setting.  But San Francisco offers a lifestyle of diversity, color, cultural stimulation, and exposure to a world much larger.

8. If you had to choose, would you rather take an otter or a raccoon for a walk?

Definitely an otter… Because I would have to take him for a swim!

9. What do you like to spend most of your time doing aside from music?

I love getting a little taste of everything… Breathing fresh air through surfing, running, biking, hiking, swimming, and yoga. Keeps me clear and content.  I love cooking and crafting with friends and family, and finding interesting cultural events.  A huge fan of the crazy festivals in San Francisco!

10. You say your a farmers market enthusiast, what makes you get all exited about going to a farmers market?

While I live in Carpinteria I sell help my family’s business by selling our avocados and flowers at the Santa Barbara farmer’s market.  There is something so special about the energy there and the abundance of health and families.  I sought out the one in San Francisco and work at the Ferry Building selling potatoes on Saturdays! Can’t get enough of the delicious food and nurturing community.

11. When you day dream, what are you thinking about 99.9% of the time?

My current daydreams are mostly about an upcoming trip to Chile.  I’ll be living and studying in Valparaiso for five months this year and my mind is swirling with images and anticipation.

12. Who are your favourite musicians?

I have many… but to name a few: Mason Jennings, Xavier Rudd, The Weepies, Jack Johnson, Fleetwood Mac, Billie Holiday, Feist, and Gillian Welsh.

13. Have you made anything with your hands lately?

I just knitted my older brother a green, alpaca beanie.

14. What kind of music are you listening to at the moment?

It’s always a mish mash, but there seems to be a lot of world music in my itunes library… Since I’m studying Spanish, it’s fun to sing along to upbeat Latin songs. I love seeing how cultures can cross over through rhythms, styles, and sounds.

15. Name 3 things you can see right in front of you?

A bowl of persimmons, an unpacked bag from a trip to Guatemala, and some clear looking skies out the window.

16. Do you have any live shows arranged soon?

I’ll be playing open mics and in a few restaurants around Santa Barbara and Carpinteria these next two months.  There is a fun music lounge/restaurant called “Live Culture” where I plan on singing soon.

Anastasia

17. Your a student and an athlete, is their a link their?

No real link… Just keeping my mind and body sane between the studies!

18. Can we expect more songs from you in the not to distant future?

In fact, I recorded a new song called “Satisfied” today.  My friend John Allen accompanied me on his mandolin.  I’ll try to keep them coming.

19. Finally, what do you see yourself doing in 10 minutes!?

Shutting down my computer, and shutting my eyes for a cat nap!

Name: Anastasia Van Wingerden
Website: www.myspace.com/stasvw
Contact: stasvw89@hotmail.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Hello and thank you for agreeing to do this interview! Lets start of with you introducing yourself, tell us where your from?
Hi Aaron, thanks for inviting me here. I come from Rethymnon, a small town in Crete. I lived for 5 years in Thessaloniki, where I studied architecture and I got back again to my town 7 years before.
2. You use flash a lot in your work, can you remember the first time you used flash and why you chose and developed this technique?
In October of  2009 I was in Athens, walking and shooting photos with my friend Costas Papageorgiou. He convinced me to buy a flash and from then and on I started to use it with a cable. I think I use it to be able to create my own light and be somehow independent from the external natural light sources, which a lot of times are not the desired ones at any moment.

3. Seeing as the street environment is out of your control, how much would you say that capturing a powerful image is down to luck?
I think luck is important in street photography, but without endless hours of walking, it brings no result just by itself. One or two photos may be a result of luck, but a whole portfolio can be born only through persistent work.
4. Your style is very eerie with a dark undertone, do you think this goes down your own subconscious perception of reality?
I don’t know, maybe…

5. Looking at your photographs you favor the wide angle lenses, why do these lenses suit your style?
Now that I think of it, maybe architecture helped me get used only to wide angle lenses. But the reaI reason I insist is that I believe photos of people have to be as close as possible to be full of life. I am not a scientist to observe through telescopes, I want to be inside life. And only the wide angle lenses permit the photographer to be inside the human crowd.
6. You take candid street portraiture using off-camera flash close up to your subject, how do people react to being photographed this way?
Most of them don’t understand what’s happening. What I’ve seen up to now is that the closer I get the less people realize that they get photographed. I have received some aggressive reactions from time to time but these incidents are relatively very few.

7. Who are some of your influences and favourite photographers at the moment?
My favourite photographers are Weegee, M.Parr ,G.Winogrand, D.Arbus , A.Sander.
I also like contemporary photographers, some of them I have presented them in my blog:
http://dirtyharrry.blogspot.com/p/photographers.html
8. Why is photography important to you?
I always carry my camera with me and when I see something interesting I take a photo of it. In the future maybe the answer to this question will be more clear in my mind, now I’m not sure. The truth is that I don’t know if I will ever be sure about anything.

9. Greece is going through some pretty tough times right now, do you think it has transcended into your work somehow, is it something you think about?
I can’t tell if the crisis is easily visible in my photos, as I’m not much interested in documentary photography. But it’s inevitable for someone who lives here to be blind to the political decadence and social struggle. I don’t know if Greece wasn’t in crisis if was shooting differently, maybe yes, maybe no. I guess since I’m now out in the streets and I shoot photos of a specific environment, that my photos are an aspect of this specific environment. Photography speaks differently to everyone, I don’t know what conclusions may come out from my photos.
10. Where do you draw the line regarding digital manipulation on your personal work?
Working on the contrast and levels in the raw files is enough for me. I think the line that I don’t want to pass is to spend more time in front of a computer editing photos I took, instead of searching for new images.

11. Do you plan to exhibit or publish any of your work in print form?
I edited two venustreet books with photos of mine and many other photographers.
I had made an exhibition two years before and I have participated in a few group exhibitions. Exhibiting is nice, as you can see your photos printed (I’ve not seen not even the 1% of my photos printed, unfortunately I rarely print) but also needs money, time etc and I don’t know if this is exactly what I can do at the moment.
12. Can you remember why you first started to photograph?
I bought my first analog camera in 1997 in the university, it was a necessary tool for my studies and my work. The first years until 2008 I was shooting only buildings and urban spaces. The way I was shooting in these early photos was terrible I must say. Not the subjects themselves, as any subject is interesting, but the way I was shooting. I paid attention only to frame well, I didn’t care at all about the meaning of what I was shooting. In 2008 I bought a digital camera and started to shoot more. I saw some Magnum photos and understood that photography is not only framing. Eleven years of terrible photos is a long time. I have to try to repair this somehow. Inside the total garbage that I shoot, I may find some moments that I like and I won’t delete. And after some months or years I’ll see these images and they will probably say nothing to me any more. I think this is more or less this is the way it goes.

13. Whats the most important thing you’ve learned thats improved you’re photography the greatest?
What I try to do is shooting as much as I can and looking at other people’s work to see how how they understand the world around them. These two things I think are very important for me, it’s a kind of dialog between my thoughts and other people’s thoughts.
14. Could you name one of your favorite photographs and explain what makes it so special?

Here’s a discussion about this photo :  
http://www.flickr.com/groups/onthestreet/discuss/72157621917523497/page127/#comment72157626483173946
15. Finally is there anything else you would like to add or promote?
Hmm… I think this world we live in has to collapse and rise again differently.
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Hello and thank you for agreeing to do this interview! Lets start of with you introducing yourself, tell us where your from?

Hi Aaron, thanks for inviting me here. I come from Rethymnon, a small town in Crete. I lived for 5 years in Thessaloniki, where I studied architecture and I got back again to my town 7 years before.

2. You use flash a lot in your work, can you remember the first time you used flash and why you chose and developed this technique?

In October of  2009 I was in Athens, walking and shooting photos with my friend Costas Papageorgiou. He convinced me to buy a flash and from then and on I started to use it with a cable. I think I use it to be able to create my own light and be somehow independent from the external natural light sources, which a lot of times are not the desired ones at any moment.

3. Seeing as the street environment is out of your control, how much would you say that capturing a powerful image is down to luck?

I think luck is important in street photography, but without endless hours of walking, it brings no result just by itself. One or two photos may be a result of luck, but a whole portfolio can be born only through persistent work.

4. Your style is very eerie with a dark undertone, do you think this goes down your own subconscious perception of reality?

I don’t know, maybe…

5. Looking at your photographs you favor the wide angle lenses, why do these lenses suit your style?

Now that I think of it, maybe architecture helped me get used only to wide angle lenses. But the reaI reason I insist is that I believe photos of people have to be as close as possible to be full of life. I am not a scientist to observe through telescopes, I want to be inside life. And only the wide angle lenses permit the photographer to be inside the human crowd.

6. You take candid street portraiture using off-camera flash close up to your subject, how do people react to being photographed this way?

Most of them don’t understand what’s happening. What I’ve seen up to now is that the closer I get the less people realize that they get photographed. I have received some aggressive reactions from time to time but these incidents are relatively very few.

7. Who are some of your influences and favourite photographers at the moment?

My favourite photographers are Weegee, M.Parr ,G.Winogrand, D.Arbus , A.Sander.

I also like contemporary photographers, some of them I have presented them in my blog:

http://dirtyharrry.blogspot.com/p/photographers.html

8. Why is photography important to you?

I always carry my camera with me and when I see something interesting I take a photo of it. In the future maybe the answer to this question will be more clear in my mind, now I’m not sure. The truth is that I don’t know if I will ever be sure about anything.

9. Greece is going through some pretty tough times right now, do you think it has transcended into your work somehow, is it something you think about?

I can’t tell if the crisis is easily visible in my photos, as I’m not much interested in documentary photography. But it’s inevitable for someone who lives here to be blind to the political decadence and social struggle. I don’t know if Greece wasn’t in crisis if was shooting differently, maybe yes, maybe no. I guess since I’m now out in the streets and I shoot photos of a specific environment, that my photos are an aspect of this specific environment. Photography speaks differently to everyone, I don’t know what conclusions may come out from my photos.

10. Where do you draw the line regarding digital manipulation on your personal work?

Working on the contrast and levels in the raw files is enough for me. I think the line that I don’t want to pass is to spend more time in front of a computer editing photos I took, instead of searching for new images.

11. Do you plan to exhibit or publish any of your work in print form?

I edited two venustreet books with photos of mine and many other photographers.

I had made an exhibition two years before and I have participated in a few group exhibitions. Exhibiting is nice, as you can see your photos printed (I’ve not seen not even the 1% of my photos printed, unfortunately I rarely print) but also needs money, time etc and I don’t know if this is exactly what I can do at the moment.

12. Can you remember why you first started to photograph?

I bought my first analog camera in 1997 in the university, it was a necessary tool for my studies and my work. The first years until 2008 I was shooting only buildings and urban spaces. The way I was shooting in these early photos was terrible I must say. Not the subjects themselves, as any subject is interesting, but the way I was shooting. I paid attention only to frame well, I didn’t care at all about the meaning of what I was shooting. In 2008 I bought a digital camera and started to shoot more. I saw some Magnum photos and understood that photography is not only framing. Eleven years of terrible photos is a long time. I have to try to repair this somehow. Inside the total garbage that I shoot, I may find some moments that I like and I won’t delete. And after some months or years I’ll see these images and they will probably say nothing to me any more. I think this is more or less this is the way it goes.

13. Whats the most important thing you’ve learned thats improved you’re photography the greatest?

What I try to do is shooting as much as I can and looking at other people’s work to see how how they understand the world around them. These two things I think are very important for me, it’s a kind of dialog between my thoughts and other people’s thoughts.

14. Could you name one of your favorite photographs and explain what makes it so special?

Here’s a discussion about this photo :  

http://www.flickr.com/groups/onthestreet/discuss/72157621917523497/page127/#comment72157626483173946

15. Finally is there anything else you would like to add or promote?

Hmm… I think this world we live in has to collapse and rise again differently.

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

 1. Firstly thanks for agreeing to this interview. Could you introduce yourself and tell us where your currently working?
I’m Kramer O’Neill, and I live in Brooklyn, NY. Sometimes I take pictures.
2. Let’s start of with your new books, ‘Pictures of People and Things 1’ and ‘Till Human Voices’. What made you want to publish these two books?
Pictures of People and Things was a little book I put together for fun while making the more “serious” Till Human Voices, but what do you know? It ended up being printed first. Not a total surprise, I guess: Pictures was made quickly from a diverse pool of years of shooting; it’s about diptychs and little narrative arcs and graphic matches. I tried not to think too much, to leave it loose and see what happened. It benefits greatly from this spontaneous assembly. I like it; it’s like looking at someone else’s edit of my work. Till Human Voices, on the other hand, is a pristine, meditative, very focused book. And that takes a lot of thought and editing and re-editing.

3. How long have you been photographing for and why did you start in the first place?
I shot a lot as a teenager, but not much in my twenties. Then I started again around five years ago, but with a totally different idea of what photography was. I used to be very concerned with getting the technical parts right, and now I hardly think about that. It’s much more about the action of making things, the expressionistic aspect rather than “correct” documentation.
4. You state on your website that you went out and made photos during morning and evening at certain times of the day within certain months of the year. Why did you choose to work within these time constraints? 
That began with a corner I liked shooting during my lunch break when I had a job in midtown Manhattan. After a while, I realized I’d been making a little project there, where it’s always more or less the same shot, but all the players have changed. When I saw the Design Trust Photo Urbanism Fellowship was accepting applications, I figured I could expand this plan to other locations. Miraculously, they liked the idea.

5. Do you have any stories of people grabbing/ reacting to your camera because they didn’t like being photographed?
Nothing terrible. Occasionally someone will confront me, but I might say something like “I was trying to photograph you, but you missed the light. You see, the way it’s falling over here, you would have needed to be…” and they get bored and wander off. Often a smile will do, or a distracted look. Sometimes they’re just curious what I’m doing, not angry. I think I’m pretty quiet and unassuming in general, the kind of guy who would have made a good “little gray man” in CIA-speak. People just don’t notice me. That’s annoying when I’m in line at the bank, but good for street photography.
6. From your Flickr account I’ve gathered that you use both film and digital cameras. Could you tell us what cameras you currently use and what makes them ideal for what you do?
My go-to has long been a Leica M4-2 that I bought used and very beaten-up. I like that; it makes me less worried about carrying it out everywhere – any new damage I inflict upon it is completely unnoticeable. And of course, it’s small and quiet, mechanical with no meter. At times, it really does feel like an extension of my own mind and body. I also use a Nikonos V for in-water stuff. It’s a brilliantly-designed waterproof rangefinder. And I have an Olympus OM1 that I use occasionally; pre-Nikonos, I used it with a diving case in the water. And I use a 5D mkII for things requiring that kind of camera.

7. Amongst your influences you noted Trent Parke as an inspiration, which is evident in your current work. What did you like about Trents working style that inspired you to go out and shoot street in a surreal way?
When I first saw Parke’s work, I didn’t think of it as street photography. My knowledge of street at the time was pretty limited; I had long loved Robert Frank's The Americans, and I was vaguely aware that it fit the genre, but Parke’s seemed so outside of it, despite the fact that he was generally shooting within a very conservative concept of street photography (ie: literally on a street). So what was different? Nothing, but everything. His processing, obviously, but also the situations he found. Many of them weren’t about human interaction at all; they worked on some other level. A filmmaker I know uses the term “illuminating the mystery of life,” and that’s what Parke’s work does for me. There’s this little space between what we logically should do and what we actually do, where we should be and where we are, the inexplicable mental or divine divergence that makes us human. That gulf is the mystery. That’s the space I want to photograph.
8. Your underwater work is truly breathtaking, why did you dive into underwater photography?
Looking back on my photography over the last five years, I can actually see myself edging closer and closer to the water. One summer of sporadic employment, I would take the subway out to Brighton Beach/Coney Island and just spend the days walking up and down the beach, photographing anything that caught my eye. But after a while that wasn’t enough. At a certain point, I was running out into the waves at Rockaway Beach, photographing bodysurfers and then jumping as high as possible when the wave crashed over me, camera overhead. And I thought: “wait, this is ridiculous. Time to get the necessary equipment and actually get in there.”

9. What motivates you to go out and document everyday life on the street?
It’s essential to my ability to cope with things I don’t understand, and there’s a whole lot I don’t understand. Some people jog, some do yoga, I photograph. (Actually, I like yoga too.) It’s not that I need to photograph, it’s that I can’t not photograph. 
10. Most of your pictures contain a high contrast, high energy aura about them. Would you say theirs more meaning to your pictures than first glance? 
I sure hope so. An easy critique of my work might be that it’s “purely aesthetics,” but aesthetics are photography. It’s not just that Garry Winogrand happened to find compelling scenes – they also looked interesting, because of light and angle and lens choice. Form and function are not separable. Great work does something specific to its genre that can’t be properly articulated in any other art form. I love good writing on photography or film or painting, but the best photos or films or paintings can’t be fully explained by writing, they can only be explained by themselves. 

11. Your work was put on show at the Atlantic Avenue Subway Station after being awarded the fifth photo Urbanism fellowship Award for your project ‘Same Time Every Day’. Did you have a chance to go down and watch peoples reactions to the work and what kind of feedback did you get from the public and people seeing it for the first time?
I’ve been there a few times, but oddly, I haven’t felt compelled to spend a long time there. I lived with these images for so long, trying to get people interested, it’s hard to stay excited about things you look at every day for years – I’m always hoping the next thing I shoot will be better. But it’s definitely fun to walk by the lightboxes, in that nobody knows who I am, so I’ve heard comments that ran the gamut: “Oh, that’s nice” to “Ugh, I don’t get this at all, why do they put up this crap?!” The fun part of it is that this isn’t a gallery, it doesn’t have the quotes around it telling people they have to appreciate it in a specific way (or appreciate it at all).
12. Your pictures are arranged into sets, almost like miniature stories. Did you consciously go out to make photos to fit into a story or was it the other way around?
Some of it is planned, some of it is about editing. I’ve done a lot of work in film editing, and have a decent sense of how to match images graphically and narratively. Often, I’ll notice I’m making a self-contained “story” midway through making it. It’s not necessarily conscious up to that point.

13. What countries most intrigue you to visit and document other than the USA, if any?
I tend to get really excited about places when I’m applying to artist residencies; there are stories to be found everywhere. Lately I’ve been putting together an application for a program in Finland, and that eastern-yet-not-Eastern Bloc concept has been fascinating me. (Note that I have yet to get any residencies, so we’ll see what I’m obsessed with next month.) I would definitely like to spend time in eastern Europe, North Africa, Australia, Latin America…have I covered everything yet? I also spend a lot of time in France for personal reasons, although the personal and the photographic are inextricably linked for me. I’m planning to move there in the next year.
14. Where do you see you and your work going in the near future?
I wish I knew, but that’s the adventure.

15. Finally, is their anything else you’d like to add or promote?
I already talked up the books, but I’ll gladly mention them again. I’m learning that self-publishing involves massive amounts of self-promotion. Which is quite a different thing from, you know, taking pictures.
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

 1. Firstly thanks for agreeing to this interview. Could you introduce yourself and tell us where your currently working?

I’m Kramer O’Neill, and I live in Brooklyn, NY. Sometimes I take pictures.

2. Let’s start of with your new books, ‘Pictures of People and Things 1’ and ‘Till Human Voices’. What made you want to publish these two books?

Pictures of People and Things was a little book I put together for fun while making the more “serious” Till Human Voices, but what do you know? It ended up being printed first. Not a total surprise, I guess: Pictures was made quickly from a diverse pool of years of shooting; it’s about diptychs and little narrative arcs and graphic matches. I tried not to think too much, to leave it loose and see what happened. It benefits greatly from this spontaneous assembly. I like it; it’s like looking at someone else’s edit of my work. Till Human Voices, on the other hand, is a pristine, meditative, very focused book. And that takes a lot of thought and editing and re-editing.


3. How long have you been photographing for and why did you start in the first place?

I shot a lot as a teenager, but not much in my twenties. Then I started again around five years ago, but with a totally different idea of what photography was. I used to be very concerned with getting the technical parts right, and now I hardly think about that. It’s much more about the action of making things, the expressionistic aspect rather than “correct” documentation.

4. You state on your website that you went out and made photos during morning and evening at certain times of the day within certain months of the year. Why did you choose to work within these time constraints? 

That began with a corner I liked shooting during my lunch break when I had a job in midtown Manhattan. After a while, I realized I’d been making a little project there, where it’s always more or less the same shot, but all the players have changed. When I saw the Design Trust Photo Urbanism Fellowship was accepting applications, I figured I could expand this plan to other locations. Miraculously, they liked the idea.


5. Do you have any stories of people grabbing/ reacting to your camera because they didn’t like being photographed?

Nothing terrible. Occasionally someone will confront me, but I might say something like “I was trying to photograph you, but you missed the light. You see, the way it’s falling over here, you would have needed to be…” and they get bored and wander off. Often a smile will do, or a distracted look. Sometimes they’re just curious what I’m doing, not angry. I think I’m pretty quiet and unassuming in general, the kind of guy who would have made a good “little gray man” in CIA-speak. People just don’t notice me. That’s annoying when I’m in line at the bank, but good for street photography.

6. From your Flickr account I’ve gathered that you use both film and digital cameras. Could you tell us what cameras you currently use and what makes them ideal for what you do?

My go-to has long been a Leica M4-2 that I bought used and very beaten-up. I like that; it makes me less worried about carrying it out everywhere – any new damage I inflict upon it is completely unnoticeable. And of course, it’s small and quiet, mechanical with no meter. At times, it really does feel like an extension of my own mind and body. I also use a Nikonos V for in-water stuff. It’s a brilliantly-designed waterproof rangefinder. And I have an Olympus OM1 that I use occasionally; pre-Nikonos, I used it with a diving case in the water. And I use a 5D mkII for things requiring that kind of camera.


7. Amongst your influences you noted Trent Parke as an inspiration, which is evident in your current work. What did you like about Trents working style that inspired you to go out and shoot street in a surreal way?

When I first saw Parke’s work, I didn’t think of it as street photography. My knowledge of street at the time was pretty limited; I had long loved Robert Frank's The Americans, and I was vaguely aware that it fit the genre, but Parke’s seemed so outside of it, despite the fact that he was generally shooting within a very conservative concept of street photography (ie: literally on a street). So what was different? Nothing, but everything. His processing, obviously, but also the situations he found. Many of them weren’t about human interaction at all; they worked on some other level. A filmmaker I know uses the term “illuminating the mystery of life,” and that’s what Parke’s work does for me. There’s this little space between what we logically should do and what we actually do, where we should be and where we are, the inexplicable mental or divine divergence that makes us human. That gulf is the mystery. That’s the space I want to photograph.

8. Your underwater work is truly breathtaking, why did you dive into underwater photography?

Looking back on my photography over the last five years, I can actually see myself edging closer and closer to the water. One summer of sporadic employment, I would take the subway out to Brighton Beach/Coney Island and just spend the days walking up and down the beach, photographing anything that caught my eye. But after a while that wasn’t enough. At a certain point, I was running out into the waves at Rockaway Beach, photographing bodysurfers and then jumping as high as possible when the wave crashed over me, camera overhead. And I thought: “wait, this is ridiculous. Time to get the necessary equipment and actually get in there.”


9. What motivates you to go out and document everyday life on the street?

It’s essential to my ability to cope with things I don’t understand, and there’s a whole lot I don’t understand. Some people jog, some do yoga, I photograph. (Actually, I like yoga too.) It’s not that I need to photograph, it’s that I can’t not photograph. 

10. Most of your pictures contain a high contrast, high energy aura about them. Would you say theirs more meaning to your pictures than first glance? 

I sure hope so. An easy critique of my work might be that it’s “purely aesthetics,” but aesthetics are photography. It’s not just that Garry Winogrand happened to find compelling scenes – they also looked interesting, because of light and angle and lens choice. Form and function are not separable. Great work does something specific to its genre that can’t be properly articulated in any other art form. I love good writing on photography or film or painting, but the best photos or films or paintings can’t be fully explained by writing, they can only be explained by themselves. 


11. Your work was put on show at the Atlantic Avenue Subway Station after being awarded the fifth photo Urbanism fellowship Award for your project ‘Same Time Every Day’. Did you have a chance to go down and watch peoples reactions to the work and what kind of feedback did you get from the public and people seeing it for the first time?

I’ve been there a few times, but oddly, I haven’t felt compelled to spend a long time there. I lived with these images for so long, trying to get people interested, it’s hard to stay excited about things you look at every day for years – I’m always hoping the next thing I shoot will be better. But it’s definitely fun to walk by the lightboxes, in that nobody knows who I am, so I’ve heard comments that ran the gamut: “Oh, that’s nice” to “Ugh, I don’t get this at all, why do they put up this crap?!” The fun part of it is that this isn’t a gallery, it doesn’t have the quotes around it telling people they have to appreciate it in a specific way (or appreciate it at all).

12. Your pictures are arranged into sets, almost like miniature stories. Did you consciously go out to make photos to fit into a story or was it the other way around?

Some of it is planned, some of it is about editing. I’ve done a lot of work in film editing, and have a decent sense of how to match images graphically and narratively. Often, I’ll notice I’m making a self-contained “story” midway through making it. It’s not necessarily conscious up to that point.


13. What countries most intrigue you to visit and document other than the USA, if any?

I tend to get really excited about places when I’m applying to artist residencies; there are stories to be found everywhere. Lately I’ve been putting together an application for a program in Finland, and that eastern-yet-not-Eastern Bloc concept has been fascinating me. (Note that I have yet to get any residencies, so we’ll see what I’m obsessed with next month.) I would definitely like to spend time in eastern Europe, North Africa, Australia, Latin America…have I covered everything yet? I also spend a lot of time in France for personal reasons, although the personal and the photographic are inextricably linked for me. I’m planning to move there in the next year.

14. Where do you see you and your work going in the near future?

I wish I knew, but that’s the adventure.


15. Finally, is their anything else you’d like to add or promote?

I already talked up the books, but I’ll gladly mention them again. I’m learning that self-publishing involves massive amounts of self-promotion. Which is quite a different thing from, you know, taking pictures.

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Hello, could you introduce yourself and tell us where your from?
Hi Aaron, I am David R. Cornejo, I was born in Mexico in 1984. I like to work with sound and all kinds of visual arts such as drawing, design, photography, and video amongst others. I currently live in downtown Guadalajara (Mexico).

2. Tell us a bit about the culture of Mexico, what kind of experiences could a traveller expect to find upon arriving at a town far away from the main tourist paths?
As soon as you get off the plane, you should head downtown. There, you can find a lot of cool places. For instance a local market where you can find fruit, food, traditional candies (many of them covered in chili), folk crafts and costumes, music, sometimes even different animals. You can also find colonial buildings most in baroque and churriqueresque styles. Haunted places (alleys, stores, houses, parks), popular legends, and cemeteries show a different side of our culture, since death is an important part of it. One of our biggest holidays, is “Día de Muertos” (The Day of the Dead) where people gather in cemeteries, build altars where they leave their deceased friends and relatives all what they liked when they were alive: tequila, cigarettes, food, and decorate them with flowers, photos, and candles as a way to remember the dead. Legend says they come back in spirit to drink, smoke, and eat, you know, remember how much fun Earth was.

3. What inspires you day to day to make art?
Most inspiration for my work comes from my absurd obsession with the occult, you know, the knowledge of the paranormal, the unexplained. That’s the most inspiring theme I have found. It never ends. I’m also really into all the kind of things I liked as a child, toys, cartoons, movies, all that takes you back to when you were only just discovering the world around you.
4. What was the inspiration behind the “Hairywords chair”?
I kept thinking how words probably create the most reproduced sound in our world (since there’s so many of us and we all speak), and how when someone writes them down they take them and give them the capacity to remain for a much longer time than when they are only spoken. 
The Hairywords Chair as well as the other installations made with this technique came basically from that idea. I painted the chair in 3 different sessions throughout a long period of time, in which I wrote memories that I recalled thru words and bits and pieces of what I heard at the moment. This created a kind of subconscious cypher and makes each person that sees it able to read a different part of it.

5. I sense a psychedelic/ geometric inspired feeling in your work, is finding order in all the chaos something you try to portray in your work?
Definitely. I am very influenced by the whole psychedelic philosophies from the 60’s and its consequences in art; the bright colorful kaleidoscopic collages. On the other hand, I feel very uncomfortable with empty spaces so that’s where the chaotic element comes from, its a sort of a “Horror vacui” thing of mine.
6. You exhibited your work through a solo exhibition, what made you want to exhibit your work to the public and how was the exhibition received?
A friend of mine invited me to make an intervention in a big black room of his concept store and boutique. I liked the idea of experimenting with Hairy Words on a bigger scale than what I’m used to and to use the walls as well as the roof. I also exhibited a series of paintings and installations with a violent and absurd childish tendency. A lot of people came, and you know, they seem to have enjoyed it.

7. You use Tumblr as a means of putting your work out their to the world, how has the internet and social networking helped you progress with your art?
My blog in Tumblr is a sort of diary of my work, a therapy that helps keep myself active and it turned out to be a very good way to meet very different people that do so many interesting things. It helps create a virtual community that I wouldn’t be able to find otherwise.

8. You’ve created visual as well as sound works, what do you enjoy about using different mediums?
I kind of rotate from one activity to another thru the year as I feel necessary. I’m very comfortable going back and forth for some reason. That’s probably why I like music, painting, and video, or anything else just the same. 
9. We both collaborated on a video about a year ago called ‘The Dream’, the response to the video was very positive. People seem to enjoy it when two well fitting artists get together and create something. What do you enjoy about collaboration?
I really enjoy how different one’s work can turn out to be when collaborating with someone else, you know, how both works can be greatly complemented by one another. I have had the opportunity to make a few collaborations thanks to the way we interact nowadays. Internet has been a great tool and it makes it so much easier to work with different people abroad. 

10. Who are the characters/ figures portrayed in a lot of your work?
I guess the characters I create are the ones I would have enjoyed to see or have as a child. My father is a publicist and my mother is a painter so I grew up surrounded by colourful and playful drawings, paintings, books that play a very big part of what I do now.  
11. Are the sounds you create an extension of your visual work, or are they something your experimenting with?
I think it might be the other way around since I started doing music and experimenting with sound even before I did with drawing, at least in a more professional level but they are definitely part of the same thing.

12. You use graph paper a lot in your works, why do you choose this over a blank canvas?
I actually use almost any surface, including graph paper. I try to find different materials as well as dirty or old things for me to paint on. I avoid blank canvases at all costs, I find them rather annoying. Such a white clean surface that’s actually meant to serve a sole purpose can be somewhat limiting and doesn’t really let me work freely.
13. Mexico has a reputation for being quite violent, would you say this is true?
Mexico has been going thru a lot this last decade, it has grown violent in some areas, mainly in the most important frontier cities. As I said before, I live in Guadalajara, and I’ve never had any kind of trouble or bad experience. 

14. Your work is very raw, in the sense that it has a sketchy feel about it. Do you work fast allowing yourself to work parallel to what your brain’s thinking in the moment?
Yes, I actually never think beforehand what I’m about to paint, I don’t prepare anything before I do so either. Everything develops right that moment and shapes itself little by little until I’m comfortable with the final result.

15. Are their any future projects you’d like to promote?
Right now I’m mostly focused in music, I have a new project called “Play Tonto”, where I use low fidelity recordings techniques to create acid, noisy melodies focusing mainly on coming up with an analog sound when digital media prevails. My first album is already finished, it’s probably going to be released later this year on audio cassette. I am also working on a 7” vinyl single. You can check it out at soundcloud.com/playtonto. On the other hand there’s “The Horse We Want To Hang” (THWWTH), a studio where we plan to include different fields such as design, clothing, music, print, film, books, etc., incorporating interesting artists from all around the world.

16. Is their anything else you’d like to add?
Well I’d like to thank you for this interview, it was really fun! I had a great time!
Name: David R. CornejoFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pillowkite/Website: http://davidrcornejo.tumblr.com/Play Tonto: http://soundcloud.com/playtonto
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Hello, could you introduce yourself and tell us where your from?

Hi Aaron, I am David R. Cornejo, I was born in Mexico in 1984. I like to work with sound and all kinds of visual arts such as drawing, design, photography, and video amongst others. I currently live in downtown Guadalajara (Mexico).

2. Tell us a bit about the culture of Mexico, what kind of experiences could a traveller expect to find upon arriving at a town far away from the main tourist paths?

As soon as you get off the plane, you should head downtown. There, you can find a lot of cool places. For instance a local market where you can find fruit, food, traditional candies (many of them covered in chili), folk crafts and costumes, music, sometimes even different animals. You can also find colonial buildings most in baroque and churriqueresque styles. Haunted places (alleys, stores, houses, parks), popular legends, and cemeteries show a different side of our culture, since death is an important part of it. One of our biggest holidays, is “Día de Muertos” (The Day of the Dead) where people gather in cemeteries, build altars where they leave their deceased friends and relatives all what they liked when they were alive: tequila, cigarettes, food, and decorate them with flowers, photos, and candles as a way to remember the dead. Legend says they come back in spirit to drink, smoke, and eat, you know, remember how much fun Earth was.

3. What inspires you day to day to make art?

Most inspiration for my work comes from my absurd obsession with the occult, you know, the knowledge of the paranormal, the unexplained. That’s the most inspiring theme I have found. It never ends. I’m also really into all the kind of things I liked as a child, toys, cartoons, movies, all that takes you back to when you were only just discovering the world around you.

4. What was the inspiration behind the “Hairywords chair”?

I kept thinking how words probably create the most reproduced sound in our world (since there’s so many of us and we all speak), and how when someone writes them down they take them and give them the capacity to remain for a much longer time than when they are only spoken. 

The Hairywords Chair as well as the other installations made with this technique came basically from that idea. I painted the chair in 3 different sessions throughout a long period of time, in which I wrote memories that I recalled thru words and bits and pieces of what I heard at the moment. This created a kind of subconscious cypher and makes each person that sees it able to read a different part of it.

David R. Cornejo - Hairywords Ball Chair

5. I sense a psychedelic/ geometric inspired feeling in your work, is finding order in all the chaos something you try to portray in your work?

Definitely. I am very influenced by the whole psychedelic philosophies from the 60’s and its consequences in art; the bright colorful kaleidoscopic collages. On the other hand, I feel very uncomfortable with empty spaces so that’s where the chaotic element comes from, its a sort of a “Horror vacui” thing of mine.

6. You exhibited your work through a solo exhibition, what made you want to exhibit your work to the public and how was the exhibition received?

A friend of mine invited me to make an intervention in a big black room of his concept store and boutique. I liked the idea of experimenting with Hairy Words on a bigger scale than what I’m used to and to use the walls as well as the roof. I also exhibited a series of paintings and installations with a violent and absurd childish tendency. A lot of people came, and you know, they seem to have enjoyed it.

The Whole World Is Our Playground. (Intervention & Solo Exhibition at "La Kalandra")

7. You use Tumblr as a means of putting your work out their to the world, how has the internet and social networking helped you progress with your art?

My blog in Tumblr is a sort of diary of my work, a therapy that helps keep myself active and it turned out to be a very good way to meet very different people that do so many interesting things. It helps create a virtual community that I wouldn’t be able to find otherwise.

jezebel spirit, jezebel spirit, jezebel spirit, jezebel spirit

8. You’ve created visual as well as sound works, what do you enjoy about using different mediums?

I kind of rotate from one activity to another thru the year as I feel necessary. I’m very comfortable going back and forth for some reason. That’s probably why I like music, painting, and video, or anything else just the same. 

9. We both collaborated on a video about a year ago called ‘The Dream’, the response to the video was very positive. People seem to enjoy it when two well fitting artists get together and create something. What do you enjoy about collaboration?

I really enjoy how different one’s work can turn out to be when collaborating with someone else, you know, how both works can be greatly complemented by one another. I have had the opportunity to make a few collaborations thanks to the way we interact nowadays. Internet has been a great tool and it makes it so much easier to work with different people abroad. 

10. Who are the characters/ figures portrayed in a lot of your work?

I guess the characters I create are the ones I would have enjoyed to see or have as a child. My father is a publicist and my mother is a painter so I grew up surrounded by colourful and playful drawings, paintings, books that play a very big part of what I do now.  

11. Are the sounds you create an extension of your visual work, or are they something your experimenting with?

I think it might be the other way around since I started doing music and experimenting with sound even before I did with drawing, at least in a more professional level but they are definitely part of the same thing.

12. You use graph paper a lot in your works, why do you choose this over a blank canvas?

I actually use almost any surface, including graph paper. I try to find different materials as well as dirty or old things for me to paint on. I avoid blank canvases at all costs, I find them rather annoying. Such a white clean surface that’s actually meant to serve a sole purpose can be somewhat limiting and doesn’t really let me work freely.

13. Mexico has a reputation for being quite violent, would you say this is true?

Mexico has been going thru a lot this last decade, it has grown violent in some areas, mainly in the most important frontier cities. As I said before, I live in Guadalajara, and I’ve never had any kind of trouble or bad experience. 

14. Your work is very raw, in the sense that it has a sketchy feel about it. Do you work fast allowing yourself to work parallel to what your brain’s thinking in the moment?

Yes, I actually never think beforehand what I’m about to paint, I don’t prepare anything before I do so either. Everything develops right that moment and shapes itself little by little until I’m comfortable with the final result.

Self Prescription

15. Are their any future projects you’d like to promote?

Right now I’m mostly focused in music, I have a new project called “Play Tonto”, where I use low fidelity recordings techniques to create acid, noisy melodies focusing mainly on coming up with an analog sound when digital media prevails. My first album is already finished, it’s probably going to be released later this year on audio cassette. I am also working on a 7” vinyl single. You can check it out at soundcloud.com/playtonto. On the other hand there’s “The Horse We Want To Hang” (THWWTH), a studio where we plan to include different fields such as design, clothing, music, print, film, books, etc., incorporating interesting artists from all around the world.

16. Is their anything else you’d like to add?

Well I’d like to thank you for this interview, it was really fun! I had a great time!

Name: David R. Cornejo
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pillowkite/

Website: http://davidrcornejo.tumblr.com/
Play Tonto: http://soundcloud.com/playtonto

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Thanks for granting us this interview. First, let’s get into your new project. How did you guys first meet, and what about your relationship made you realize that you you two should work on tunes together? 
Doubleclick: We both lived in Brighton, but despite having a few friends in common, we didn’t actually cross paths until about ten years ago. When you both like Jungle, Cardiacs and tracks like Brandy’s “What About Us?”, you pretty much have to make an LP. I’m speaking from a position of limited experience, but it’s been 100% true in all cases in which I was personally involved. 
2. How did the name Two Fingers come about? 
Doubleclick: We went through a lot of potential names, using all the usual methods. At one point I got so desperate I even tried the “anagram of your last names” thing, but that doesn’t work so well when you’re called Tobin and Chapman. I know Two Fingers isn’t the greatest name in the world, but would you want to be part of an act called Phantom Cabin? Or Bacon Ham Pint? A Camp Thin Nob? Me neither. 
3. Were you guys shooting to work on an album together? 
Doubleclick: Yes, and more. We set out to make the LP, and then do production for other musicians. 
4. The majority of the album features vocals, including Sway atop 7 of the 12 tracks. Was that by design? How did you guys get Sway to contribute so much to the project? 
Amon: I cornered him at a festival in France and handed him a CD of our beats. He didn’t know it yet, but we’d already decided he was going to be the main vocalist on the record. 
5. How would you describe the Two Fingers sound? I saw in URB that you guys classify this as a Hip-Hop album. Do you think the buying public will?
Doubleclick: A lot of people think Hip-Hop is just a certain sound, that it’s an easily definable style of music, and that’s fine, but they don’t think the way we do. I think Hip-Hop is more than that (more than just music too, but that’s another discussion). It’s partly in the style, but it’s also in your way of thinking, the approach to what you do. I wouldn’t feel comfortable if this LP sounded like other people’s Hip-Hop anyway. We had an idea, and we couldn’t stifle it just to fit other people’s expectations.
Amon: Yo, andatzwatsup! 
Doubleclick: Quiet, you. 
6. What kind of equipment was used in creating the album? 
Amon: Some important pieces of hardware: Chandler compression and in particular the Manley EQ. 
7. I read a description of the album that described it as a “brutal and beautiful record that could only have grown out of the UK and the internationalism of those involved”. Do you have any thoughts on where that distinct hybrid sound of the UK will be going in the next 5 years or so? Do you think genres like dubstep could blow up on a larger scale? Doubleclick: Absolutely, and it’s overdue, particularly for the producers. The recent news about Snoop rhyming over Chase & Status’s “Eastern Jam” is a controversial subject, but I’m really excited to see where that can go. Back in ‘94, you had Goldie and 4-Hero remixing Scarface, Rob Playford & Foul Play remixing King Just… I was always expecting that the incredible production talent in DnB would end up doing full-on Hip-Hop work, and of course eventually we had the Adam F ”K.A.O.S.” project, but it never really went the way I expected. I see dubstep and DnB as extensions of the same thing, and I think there’s plenty that our producers can contribute directly to the US Hip-Hop and R&B scenes. As for whether dubstep itself could blow up, it certainly could and in many ways it already has. It’s for the producers in the scene to decide what happens next. 8. Word is Two Fingers will be performing live with Sway for a few dates in May (including a show at The Scala on May 13th). What can heads expect from this environment - will you guys stick to the tracks, or is there room for exploration and freestyling? Amon: We’ll be using decks combined with Native Instruments’ Traktor Scratch Pro, which allows us to give Sway free rein. He can go off on tangents in any way he likes, and we can fit the structure of the music around his performance. 9. Are there plans for any Two Fingers releases after this one? 
Amon: We’ve got another single (“That Girl”) coming in May which features the remix by Spor. We’re also planning a reworking of another LP track for another single release later in the year. 
10. Now, many heads would be upset if I didn’t ask - when are you going to churn out some more Jungle/DnB-esque tunes? Doubleclick: Anyone who loves DnB will hear straight away that there’s a strong thread of DnB running through the LP, especially in tracks like “Keman Rhythm”, but it’s very much blended into other styles. We have some tracks which didn’t make it onto the LP which are more explicitly DnB. There are so many tunes that just wouldn’t fit, and believe me it kills us hearing these things, thinking “if only we could have got this on there”. We have talked about doing an EP of DnB, though, so maybe we’ll get it out that way. We’ll be producing for other vocalists again soon, too, so maybe we can sneak a little something past them when they’re not looking. 11. Do you have a favorite tune from your back catalogue? Amon: There’s a track called “Slowly” I’ll always have a soft spot for. 12. Any chatter about an Amon Tobin solo album in the future? Amon: I’m going to start recording towards the end of this year. I’ve got this idea but it’s way too ambitious… it might have to remain a pipe dream, so I’ll keep it under my hat until I know I can do it for sure. Either way, I’ll continue to release one-off tunes regularly on my site (amontobin.com). I have to keep making tunes even if it’s not for a bigger project, otherwise I get a bit twitchy. More TF stuff on its way too, of course. 13. Do you get excited about new artists? Who is currently on your radar as someone who’s doing exciting work? Amon: I get inspired all the time by other producers. I want to keep learning and progress and I think the best way to do that is to listen with an open mind. I recently spent a bit of time at Eskmo’s studio, and he taught me a lot in a very short space of time. I had the same experience with the guys from Noisia a while back. These are all people who love what they do and are dedicated to their own progress in production. I find that motivating in itself. 14. Could we get a current top 10 from you? Doubleclick: The last few months have been a bit crazy, and we haven’t been able to buy anything or really listen to much music. I only get to listen to things on headphones when I’m on my way out these days, so I’ll give you a top eleven of what’s on my iPod today instead: Bettye Swann - Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye Fatme Serhan - Ala Warag Il Foull Frank Black - History Song Gremlinz, Manifest & Verb - Lion Of Babylon Broken Note - Crux Lil Kim - Lighters Up (Marc Mac remix) Billy Bragg - Levi Stubbs’s Tears Raphael Saadiq - Still Ray Tim Smith - Bug From Heaven Trimbal - Taliban Brandy – Necessary 15. Do you have any shout outs or final thoughts? Doubleclick: Thanks again to Khoma for the LP and singles artwork. Thanks too to Pillsbury for inventing canned cinnamon rolls with icing. Got me through some difficult winters in Montreal. 
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Thanks for granting us this interview. First, let’s get into your new project. How did you guys first meet, and what about your relationship made you realize that you you two should work on tunes together? 

DoubleclickWe both lived in Brighton, but despite having a few friends in common, we didn’t actually cross paths until about ten years ago. When you both like Jungle, Cardiacs and tracks like Brandy’s “What About Us?”, you pretty much have to make an LP. I’m speaking from a position of limited experience, but it’s been 100% true in all cases in which I was personally involved. 

2. How did the name Two Fingers come about? 

DoubleclickWe went through a lot of potential names, using all the usual methods. At one point I got so desperate I even tried the “anagram of your last names” thing, but that doesn’t work so well when you’re called Tobin and Chapman. I know Two Fingers isn’t the greatest name in the world, but would you want to be part of an act called Phantom Cabin? Or Bacon Ham PintA Camp Thin Nob? Me neither. 

3. Were you guys shooting to work on an album together? 

Doubleclick: Yes, and more. We set out to make the LP, and then do production for other musicians. 

4. The majority of the album features vocals, including Sway atop 7 of the 12 tracks. Was that by design? How did you guys get Sway to contribute so much to the project? 

Amon: I cornered him at a festival in France and handed him a CD of our beats. He didn’t know it yet, but we’d already decided he was going to be the main vocalist on the record. 

5. How would you describe the Two Fingers sound? I saw in URB that you guys classify this as a Hip-Hop album. Do you think the buying public will?

Doubleclick: A lot of people think Hip-Hop is just a certain sound, that it’s an easily definable style of music, and that’s fine, but they don’t think the way we do. I think Hip-Hop is more than that (more than just music too, but that’s another discussion). It’s partly in the style, but it’s also in your way of thinking, the approach to what you do. I wouldn’t feel comfortable if this LP sounded like other people’s Hip-Hop anyway. We had an idea, and we couldn’t stifle it just to fit other people’s expectations.

Amon: Yo, andatzwatsup! 

Doubleclick: Quiet, you. 

6. What kind of equipment was used in creating the album? 

Amon: Some important pieces of hardware: Chandler compression and in particular the Manley EQ. 

7. I read a description of the album that described it as a “brutal and beautiful record that could only have grown out of the UK and the internationalism of those involved”. Do you have any thoughts on where that distinct hybrid sound of the UK will be going in the next 5 years or so? Do you think genres like dubstep could blow up on a larger scale? 

Doubleclick: Absolutely, and it’s overdue, particularly for the producers. The recent news about Snoop rhyming over Chase & Status’s “Eastern Jam” is a controversial subject, but I’m really excited to see where that can go. Back in ‘94, you had Goldie and 4-Hero remixing Scarface, Rob Playford & Foul Play remixing King Just… I was always expecting that the incredible production talent in DnB would end up doing full-on Hip-Hop work, and of course eventually we had the Adam F ”K.A.O.S.” project, but it never really went the way I expected. I see dubstep and DnB as extensions of the same thing, and I think there’s plenty that our producers can contribute directly to the US Hip-Hop and R&B scenes. As for whether dubstep itself could blow up, it certainly could and in many ways it already has. It’s for the producers in the scene to decide what happens next. 

8. Word is Two Fingers will be performing live with Sway for a few dates in May (including a show at The Scala on May 13th). What can heads expect from this environment - will you guys stick to the tracks, or is there room for exploration and freestyling? 

Amon: We’ll be using decks combined with Native Instruments’ Traktor Scratch Pro, which allows us to give Sway free rein. He can go off on tangents in any way he likes, and we can fit the structure of the music around his performance. 

9. Are there plans for any Two Fingers releases after this one? 


Amon: We’ve got another single (“That Girl”) coming in May which features the remix by Spor. We’re also planning a reworking of another LP track for another single release later in the year. 

10. Now, many heads would be upset if I didn’t ask - when are you going to churn out some more Jungle/DnB-esque tunes? 

Doubleclick: Anyone who loves DnB will hear straight away that there’s a strong thread of DnB running through the LP, especially in tracks like “Keman Rhythm”, but it’s very much blended into other styles. We have some tracks which didn’t make it onto the LP which are more explicitly DnB. There are so many tunes that just wouldn’t fit, and believe me it kills us hearing these things, thinking “if only we could have got this on there”. We have talked about doing an EP of DnB, though, so maybe we’ll get it out that way. We’ll be producing for other vocalists again soon, too, so maybe we can sneak a little something past them when they’re not looking. 

11. Do you have a favorite tune from your back catalogue? 

Amon: There’s a track called “Slowly” I’ll always have a soft spot for. 

12. Any chatter about an Amon Tobin solo album in the future? 

Amon: I’m going to start recording towards the end of this year. I’ve got this idea but it’s way too ambitious… it might have to remain a pipe dream, so I’ll keep it under my hat until I know I can do it for sure. Either way, I’ll continue to release one-off tunes regularly on my site (amontobin.com). I have to keep making tunes even if it’s not for a bigger project, otherwise I get a bit twitchy. More TF stuff on its way too, of course. 

13. Do you get excited about new artists? Who is currently on your radar as someone who’s doing exciting work? 

Amon: I get inspired all the time by other producers. I want to keep learning and progress and I think the best way to do that is to listen with an open mind. I recently spent a bit of time at Eskmo’s studio, and he taught me a lot in a very short space of time. I had the same experience with the guys from Noisia a while back. These are all people who love what they do and are dedicated to their own progress in production. I find that motivating in itself. 

14. Could we get a current top 10 from you? 

Doubleclick: The last few months have been a bit crazy, and we haven’t been able to buy anything or really listen to much music. I only get to listen to things on headphones when I’m on my way out these days, so I’ll give you a top eleven of what’s on my iPod today instead: 

Bettye Swann - Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye 
Fatme Serhan - Ala Warag Il Foull 
Frank Black - History Song 
Gremlinz, Manifest & Verb - Lion Of Babylon 
Broken Note - Crux 
Lil Kim - Lighters Up (Marc Mac remix) 
Billy Bragg - Levi Stubbs’s Tears 
Raphael Saadiq - Still Ray 
Tim Smith - Bug From Heaven 
Trimbal - Taliban 
Brandy – Necessary
 

15. Do you have any shout outs or final thoughts? 

Doubleclick: Thanks again to Khoma for the LP and singles artwork. Thanks too to Pillsbury for inventing canned cinnamon rolls with icing. Got me through some difficult winters in Montreal. 

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. So what are the Wilcox Sessions?
Dick Thompson: Live hybrid-music videos recorded in our living room.
2. Where about’s on planet Earth do you record the sessions?
Dick Thompson: Hollywood, USA.
3. Why did you want to start this project?
Dick Thompson: We are huge music fans. Our first date was supposed to be Interpol at the Troubador, but I slept on getting tickets so we saw The Neptunas at the Mint instead.  I had always wanted to make music videos, Beaver wrote music previews for Flavorpill in NY, SF, and LA. She made a number of mix tapes each year for our friends that always featured new music no one had ever heard of. Around 2006 we had an idea to curate a monthly music show at our homies Equator Books in Venice and I would “film the bands and put it up on the Internet.”  We never got our shit together though. Then in February of 2010 Equator Books was closing it’s doors for good we were filled with a lot of regret for all the things we said we wanted to do but never did.  Fifteen year olds Dead Henry were playing the closing night party (little kyle was an intern) and their youth and excitement brought an element of exuberance and hope to an overall melancholic night – that’s when the idea was re-born. We went out and bought a camera the next day and two weeks later we had shot our first session.




4. How did you (Dick and Beaver) meet?
Dick Thompson: We met on a four day party weekend in LA back in early 2000’s. Here is our wedding commercial from ’08.

5. How do you choose the bands you record? 
Dick Thompson: A co-worker of mine answered this for me once, “Whoever will say yes.”  When we did our first session we didn’t really know any bands personally. We asked Dead Henry to be the guinea pigs for our first session, little Kyle from the band worked at our friend’s bookstore, Equator Books. After that it kind of snowballed and it went from friends of friends to managers, labels, and publicists becoming involved. Now the general reaction is “How did you get them to play your living room.” Our friend and collaborator Douglas Caballero has been great for us. He was the producer and host of a daily music program for Current TV so he knew the landscape pretty well, he booked a lot of cool bands for us like Voxhaul Broadcast, The Greenhornes and Moby. Each situation is completely different really. Little Hurricane was the first band to contact us from our website, we met Brooks from The Growlers in a swimming pool in Palm Springs, The Neighbors went to high school with Dead Henry. We don’t really understand why people show up ourselves, but we love it that they do. The bottom line is we invest our own money and most of our free time into the videos, so that generally guides our decisions.
6. What prior work have you done in video?
Dick Thompson: I’ve been a filmmaker since my teens. I’ve done a few music videos in the past and bunch of short films and I make my living as an editor for a television network.
Porn Guide: The Film Maker’s Guide to Pornography: 

 Blow: A Public Service Announcement:




Dead Man Eating:
 



Bedroom Scene Music Video:




7. Some of the props used in the videos are extremely unique. Big vintage lights, ball pits, tin foil furniture!? Are you responsible for the props or do the bands bring them? 
Dick Thompson: We try to do something unique for each video, and props and lighting are an easy way to do that. We bought the Fortuny lamp at a designer garage sale for the sole purpose of being a prop for the sessions. I bought the kiddie pool in hopes that we would fill it with water, but Beaver put the kybosh on it so we filled it up with the balls instead. The foil was 100% The Growlers. We had already bought a fish tank and 2 fish bowls for their session when they showed up with a box full of space blankets. It took them at least an hour to set them up.  It’s amazing how creative and committed they are.




8. What inspired you to theme the Wilcox Sessions in your living room?
Dick Thompson: Both necessity and laziness. When we bought the loft I never thought we could afford to shoot another project.  You could say it was born out of a creative solution to a financial problem. Leverage what you have.
9. Is the ‘take your shoes off’ rule something that happens even when your not recording?
Dick Thompson: Absolutely. My dad used to greet his guests, “Take your shoes off and stay a while.” David from Voxhaul Broadcast still apologizes every time he sees us for forgetting.  Beaver sends an email out to each band before their session reminding them to wear snazzy socks along with a short questionnaire: 1) what’s your favorite food? 2) what’s your favorite booze (it’s usually whiskey btw).

10. What new artists are you eyeing up for future recordings?
Dick Thompson: Los Angeles is a hot bed of talent right now, there are so many great bands.   We like Foster The People, Superhumanoids, The Chain Gang of 1974, Shannon and The Clams. We only shoot on the weekends so sometimes we get lucky where a band is coming through town and has the night off, like with The Greenhornes. Whoever will say yes, that we dig, basically.
11. The quality of your recordings are very high, both visually and sonically. How do you achieve this level of quality time after time?
Dick Thompson: We have a great crew and most have been with us from the very beginning.  We shoot on multiple Canon 7ds or 5ds. The most we’ve had was seven, but we were pretty much tripping over each other all night. The secret recipe is four cameras with operators and one on lockdown. I also have a couple GOPRO HD HEROs which are good for timelapses of setup or tucked away in a drum kit or keyboard.  We usually have a small jib arm or doorway dolly and my favorite is the smoke machine. Our sound engineer Bruce Hall literally brings a truck of equipment over that you could pretty much record a legit album on. He usually uses at least 24-30 mics each individually tracked so there is a lot of flexibility in the mix for our sound producer Manoj Gopinath to get it right. We usually spend around 20 hours on the edit of each video too.  So even though we record live, we take a lot of liberties in post that make a big difference. The process is often drunken and ragtag but the results are professional. 

12. Most of the bands and artists you record are quite niche, is new music something your want to promote?
Dick Thompson: Absolutely. We love the discovery aspect of music. There’s an energy and excitement to up and coming bands that makes the laborious aspects of production more satisfying. Production is hard, physical work, and feeling like the hired help on a promotional stop makes everything seem heavier. New bands definitely take advantage of the free liquor cabinet more often than not, which usually makes everyone happier. 

13. What happens behind the scenes when the bands have gone home?
Dick Thompson: If the band wants to stay and party we certainly accommodate that.  Sometimes it’s very professional and we shake hands and that’s that. In the case of the Hanni El Khatib session we all stayed up late, then made a baby. 
14. Where does the name ‘Wilcox Sessions’ come from, is it a surname?
Dick Thompson: It’s named after the street we live on. My biggest regret is the ‘sessions’ moniker, since there are so many ‘sessions’ out there now. I like the ‘Dick and Beaver’ Music Show better.
15. If you could give one piece of random advise what would it be?
Dick Thompson: Stop talking about it and get off your ass and do something and good things will happen.
16. Is their anything you’d like to add?
Dick Thompson: Nope, think that’s it. Thanks for watching. 
 
Name: The Wilcox SessionsFacebook: http://www.facebook.com/wilcoxsessionsTwitter: http://twitter.com/wilcoxsessions/Website: http://wilcoxsessions.com/Contact: wilcoxsessions@gmail.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. So what are the Wilcox Sessions?

Dick Thompson: Live hybrid-music videos recorded in our living room.

2. Where about’s on planet Earth do you record the sessions?

Dick Thompson: Hollywood, USA.

3. Why did you want to start this project?

Dick Thompson: We are huge music fans. Our first date was supposed to be Interpol at the Troubador, but I slept on getting tickets so we saw The Neptunas at the Mint instead.  I had always wanted to make music videos, Beaver wrote music previews for Flavorpill in NY, SF, and LA. She made a number of mix tapes each year for our friends that always featured new music no one had ever heard of. Around 2006 we had an idea to curate a monthly music show at our homies Equator Books in Venice and I would “film the bands and put it up on the Internet.”  We never got our shit together though. Then in February of 2010 Equator Books was closing it’s doors for good we were filled with a lot of regret for all the things we said we wanted to do but never did.  Fifteen year olds Dead Henry were playing the closing night party (little kyle was an intern) and their youth and excitement brought an element of exuberance and hope to an overall melancholic night – that’s when the idea was re-born. We went out and bought a camera the next day and two weeks later we had shot our first session.

4. How did you (Dick and Beaver) meet?

Dick Thompson: We met on a four day party weekend in LA back in early 2000’s. Here is our wedding commercial from ’08.

5. How do you choose the bands you record? 

Dick Thompson: A co-worker of mine answered this for me once, “Whoever will say yes.”  When we did our first session we didn’t really know any bands personally. We asked Dead Henry to be the guinea pigs for our first session, little Kyle from the band worked at our friend’s bookstore, Equator Books. After that it kind of snowballed and it went from friends of friends to managers, labels, and publicists becoming involved. Now the general reaction is “How did you get them to play your living room.” Our friend and collaborator Douglas Caballero has been great for us. He was the producer and host of a daily music program for Current TV so he knew the landscape pretty well, he booked a lot of cool bands for us like Voxhaul Broadcast, The Greenhornes and Moby. Each situation is completely different really. Little Hurricane was the first band to contact us from our website, we met Brooks from The Growlers in a swimming pool in Palm Springs, The Neighbors went to high school with Dead Henry. We don’t really understand why people show up ourselves, but we love it that they do. The bottom line is we invest our own money and most of our free time into the videos, so that generally guides our decisions.

6. What prior work have you done in video?

Dick Thompson: I’ve been a filmmaker since my teens. I’ve done a few music videos in the past and bunch of short films and I make my living as an editor for a television network.

Porn Guide: The Film Maker’s Guide to Pornography: 

 Blow: A Public Service Announcement:

Dead Man Eating:

Bedroom Scene Music Video:

7. Some of the props used in the videos are extremely unique. Big vintage lights, ball pits, tin foil furniture!? Are you responsible for the props or do the bands bring them? 

Dick Thompson: We try to do something unique for each video, and props and lighting are an easy way to do that. We bought the Fortuny lamp at a designer garage sale for the sole purpose of being a prop for the sessions. I bought the kiddie pool in hopes that we would fill it with water, but Beaver put the kybosh on it so we filled it up with the balls instead. The foil was 100% The Growlers. We had already bought a fish tank and 2 fish bowls for their session when they showed up with a box full of space blankets. It took them at least an hour to set them up.  It’s amazing how creative and committed they are.

8. What inspired you to theme the Wilcox Sessions in your living room?

Dick Thompson: Both necessity and laziness. When we bought the loft I never thought we could afford to shoot another project.  You could say it was born out of a creative solution to a financial problem. Leverage what you have.

9. Is the ‘take your shoes off’ rule something that happens even when your not recording?

Dick Thompson: Absolutely. My dad used to greet his guests, “Take your shoes off and stay a while.” David from Voxhaul Broadcast still apologizes every time he sees us for forgetting.  Beaver sends an email out to each band before their session reminding them to wear snazzy socks along with a short questionnaire: 1) what’s your favorite food? 2) what’s your favorite booze (it’s usually whiskey btw).

56391_180463008630640_147363085273966_643831_1362423_o

10. What new artists are you eyeing up for future recordings?

Dick Thompson: Los Angeles is a hot bed of talent right now, there are so many great bands.   We like Foster The People, Superhumanoids, The Chain Gang of 1974, Shannon and The Clams. We only shoot on the weekends so sometimes we get lucky where a band is coming through town and has the night off, like with The Greenhornes. Whoever will say yes, that we dig, basically.

11. The quality of your recordings are very high, both visually and sonically. How do you achieve this level of quality time after time?

Dick Thompson: We have a great crew and most have been with us from the very beginning.  We shoot on multiple Canon 7ds or 5ds. The most we’ve had was seven, but we were pretty much tripping over each other all night. The secret recipe is four cameras with operators and one on lockdown. I also have a couple GOPRO HD HEROs which are good for timelapses of setup or tucked away in a drum kit or keyboard.  We usually have a small jib arm or doorway dolly and my favorite is the smoke machine. Our sound engineer Bruce Hall literally brings a truck of equipment over that you could pretty much record a legit album on. He usually uses at least 24-30 mics each individually tracked so there is a lot of flexibility in the mix for our sound producer Manoj Gopinath to get it right. We usually spend around 20 hours on the edit of each video too.  So even though we record live, we take a lot of liberties in post that make a big difference. The process is often drunken and ragtag but the results are professional.

40759_167453289931612_147363085273966_558749_8060884_n

12. Most of the bands and artists you record are quite niche, is new music something your want to promote?

Dick Thompson: Absolutely. We love the discovery aspect of music. There’s an energy and excitement to up and coming bands that makes the laborious aspects of production more satisfying. Production is hard, physical work, and feeling like the hired help on a promotional stop makes everything seem heavier. New bands definitely take advantage of the free liquor cabinet more often than not, which usually makes everyone happier. 

68695_167692946574313_147363085273966_560765_6961396_n

13. What happens behind the scenes when the bands have gone home?

Dick Thompson: If the band wants to stay and party we certainly accommodate that.  Sometimes it’s very professional and we shake hands and that’s that. In the case of the Hanni El Khatib session we all stayed up late, then made a baby. 

14. Where does the name ‘Wilcox Sessions’ come from, is it a surname?

Dick Thompson: It’s named after the street we live on. My biggest regret is the ‘sessions’ moniker, since there are so many ‘sessions’ out there now. I like the ‘Dick and Beaver’ Music Show better.

15. If you could give one piece of random advise what would it be?

Dick Thompson: Stop talking about it and get off your ass and do something and good things will happen.

16. Is their anything you’d like to add?

Dick Thompson: Nope, think that’s it. Thanks for watching. 

Name: The Wilcox Sessions
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wilcoxsessions
Twitter: http://twitter.com/wilcoxsessions/

Website: http://wilcoxsessions.com/
Contact: 
wilcoxsessions@gmail.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Hello, could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where your currently located?
Hello! My name is Jack Coleman and I currently live and work out of Newport Beach/Costa Mesa, California.
2. Have you always lived by the sea?
I grew up about 35 miles inland from the beach, but I was hooked on the sea at a young age and ended up moving to beach cities starting age 18, so I’ve lived by the sea for 19 years. WOH, im dating myself.




3. What is the surroundings and culture of California like for artists like yourself?
The surrounding are great, if you take away the greed and superficiality of Orange County it is a really amazing place to be a surfer. The weather is never overly uncomfortable, the water is relatively warm, and there are always waves to ride, and Mexico is just a car drive away. The culture is great as well, I collect culture when I travel and keep that stoke inside like a squirrel that collects nuts, nuts of stoke and life.
4. How do you go about producing and directing a music video?
listen to song, brainstorm, think of how to shoot it without using artificial light, think of film stock, can I pay for it myself? Gotta like the song, think about lighting again, buy the film with my last dollars to my name (expecting not to be paid for the expenses), put the date into motion, collect props, visualize scenes, listen to song again, and again, expect to do everything myself, stoked on any help I can get, think nice thoughts, get the shoot going, and of course- have fun.




5. How did you end up working and touring with the Growlers?
They played at my first photography show 4 years ago @ The Detroit Bar with The Japanese Motors led by the great Alex Knost. Guitarist Nolan Hall said he had some friends who would play the show for free and we were introduced that way, and the rest is history.
6. Is it usual for you to work on a video by yourself or do you work with other people?
I usually work alone and get help from the hands that are there, to many people around kinda sucks. 
7. Why do you still use film rather than digital methods for some of your videos?
I first started shooting with 35mm film growing up, so for me the results are worth the hell I sometimes go through. I remember watching projected family films at my uncles house, that is why I have always been drawn to the feel of motion film.




8. How hard is it now to get your exposed film, processed and then digitalised into a format to edit with?
It takes about 2 weeks if I really am on it unless I process the film myself. Its 3 processes that I go through: shooting, processing, and transferring. It can sometimes be frustrating losing film that was exposed wrong or loaded bad. But that anticipation of a final image is what drives me everyday. Getting back some nicely exposed film gives you such a feel of accomplishment and relief when you get it back.
9. Are their any techniques to get strange effects with 16mm film by processing it in different chemicals/ temperatures?
I have been developing my own BW lately and it is always a crap shoot. I use mostly feel and gut for alot of the process. Developing 100 foot rolls in buckets with all my temperatures and times mostly done in my head using intuition to know when its right, and I’m starting to get better at it. I mostly do it myself to save money to buy more film so I can shoot more film.




10. What has been one of your favourite videos to date/ and why?
My own, “What It Is” by The Growlers because it was all improved and just happened as the shoot went.
11. How does the sea and surfing fit into your life?
It is my life. 
12. Why did you first pick up a camera?
When I first started to travel at age 22, I used to use an olympus 35mm point n’ shoot, then I bought a 35mm SLR manual camera from a surfer for $15.

13. What interests you about taking photos?
Something for people to remember and inspire, an image can sometimes change a persons life. It is that powerful to me.
14. Do you strive for perfection or are the imperfections something that make something perfect?
I try to strive for imperfection, but making pictures can sometime be a really controlled atmosphere.
15. Your work has a retro feeling to it, are you someone that looks into the past for inspiration and aesthetics or do you look into the future for new technology or the latest thing etc?
I look to the past for most of my research, but I do believe that technology isnt a step backwards.




16. How did you get involved with Vestal?
Was a friend with couple of employees and eventually the marketing director and owner liked my stuff and felt it was time for more of a lifestyle, free-wheeling campaign, so they brought me aboard in 2009.
17. If you could give yourself a style, like a musical genre, what would you call it?
Surf Porn.
18. Do you own any analogue cameras?
Yah, I am currently using a Bell & Howell 16mm camera. I today described shooting with it like, “trying to build cabinets with a hand saw”. I also have a Cambo 4x5 which is my favorite camera.

19. What are your likes and dislikes of film vs digital?
I like that film is actually real, it is something you can touch and feel. Digital is millions of pixels that have no physicality until its put onto paper as a print (which usually doesnt happen). Film brings depth and substance - While digital flattens and takes away the human element.
20. Where is your favourite place to eat and whats on the menu?
My favorite place to eat is Gloria’s Mexican restaurant in Costa Mesa on 19th street. Has the best Fish tacos and Mexicano burritos, $6 and you’re stoked
21. Is their anything you’d like to add or promote which we haven’t talked about yet?
My website is www.jackcolemanphoto.com and i usually keep the blog pretty up to date with projects I’ve shot and how I shot them.




 22. Thanks for you time! Keep doinwadyoudodude!
Get outta whatdyado!
 
Name: Jack ColemanWebsite: www.jackcolemanphoto.com/Contact: jackcolemanphotography@gmail.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Hello, could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where your currently located?

Hello! My name is Jack Coleman and I currently live and work out of Newport Beach/Costa Mesa, California.

2. Have you always lived by the sea?

I grew up about 35 miles inland from the beach, but I was hooked on the sea at a young age and ended up moving to beach cities starting age 18, so I’ve lived by the sea for 19 years. WOH, im dating myself.

3. What is the surroundings and culture of California like for artists like yourself?

The surrounding are great, if you take away the greed and superficiality of Orange County it is a really amazing place to be a surfer. The weather is never overly uncomfortable, the water is relatively warm, and there are always waves to ride, and Mexico is just a car drive away. The culture is great as well, I collect culture when I travel and keep that stoke inside like a squirrel that collects nuts, nuts of stoke and life.

4. How do you go about producing and directing a music video?

listen to song, brainstorm, think of how to shoot it without using artificial light, think of film stock, can I pay for it myself? Gotta like the song, think about lighting again, buy the film with my last dollars to my name (expecting not to be paid for the expenses), put the date into motion, collect props, visualize scenes, listen to song again, and again, expect to do everything myself, stoked on any help I can get, think nice thoughts, get the shoot going, and of course- have fun.

5. How did you end up working and touring with the Growlers?

They played at my first photography show 4 years ago @ The Detroit Bar with The Japanese Motors led by the great Alex Knost. Guitarist Nolan Hall said he had some friends who would play the show for free and we were introduced that way, and the rest is history.

6. Is it usual for you to work on a video by yourself or do you work with other people?

I usually work alone and get help from the hands that are there, to many people around kinda sucks. 

7. Why do you still use film rather than digital methods for some of your videos?

I first started shooting with 35mm film growing up, so for me the results are worth the hell I sometimes go through. I remember watching projected family films at my uncles house, that is why I have always been drawn to the feel of motion film.

8. How hard is it now to get your exposed film, processed and then digitalised into a format to edit with?

It takes about 2 weeks if I really am on it unless I process the film myself. Its 3 processes that I go through: shooting, processing, and transferring. It can sometimes be frustrating losing film that was exposed wrong or loaded bad. But that anticipation of a final image is what drives me everyday. Getting back some nicely exposed film gives you such a feel of accomplishment and relief when you get it back.

9. Are their any techniques to get strange effects with 16mm film by processing it in different chemicals/ temperatures?

I have been developing my own BW lately and it is always a crap shoot. I use mostly feel and gut for alot of the process. Developing 100 foot rolls in buckets with all my temperatures and times mostly done in my head using intuition to know when its right, and I’m starting to get better at it. I mostly do it myself to save money to buy more film so I can shoot more film.

10. What has been one of your favourite videos to date/ and why?

My own, “What It Is” by The Growlers because it was all improved and just happened as the shoot went.

11. How does the sea and surfing fit into your life?

It is my life. 

12. Why did you first pick up a camera?

When I first started to travel at age 22, I used to use an olympus 35mm point n’ shoot, then I bought a 35mm SLR manual camera from a surfer for $15.

Jack Coleman

13. What interests you about taking photos?

Something for people to remember and inspire, an image can sometimes change a persons life. It is that powerful to me.

14. Do you strive for perfection or are the imperfections something that make something perfect?

I try to strive for imperfection, but making pictures can sometime be a really controlled atmosphere.

15. Your work has a retro feeling to it, are you someone that looks into the past for inspiration and aesthetics or do you look into the future for new technology or the latest thing etc?

I look to the past for most of my research, but I do believe that technology isnt a step backwards.

16. How did you get involved with Vestal?

Was a friend with couple of employees and eventually the marketing director and owner liked my stuff and felt it was time for more of a lifestyle, free-wheeling campaign, so they brought me aboard in 2009.

17. If you could give yourself a style, like a musical genre, what would you call it?

Surf Porn.

18. Do you own any analogue cameras?

Yah, I am currently using a Bell & Howell 16mm camera. I today described shooting with it like, “trying to build cabinets with a hand saw”. I also have a Cambo 4x5 which is my favorite camera.

Jack Coleman

19. What are your likes and dislikes of film vs digital?

I like that film is actually real, it is something you can touch and feel. Digital is millions of pixels that have no physicality until its put onto paper as a print (which usually doesnt happen). Film brings depth and substance - While digital flattens and takes away the human element.

20. Where is your favourite place to eat and whats on the menu?

My favorite place to eat is Gloria’s Mexican restaurant in Costa Mesa on 19th street. Has the best Fish tacos and Mexicano burritos, $6 and you’re stoked

21. Is their anything you’d like to add or promote which we haven’t talked about yet?

My website is www.jackcolemanphoto.com and i usually keep the blog pretty up to date with projects I’ve shot and how I shot them.

 22. Thanks for you time! Keep doinwadyoudodude!

Get outta whatdyado!

Name: Jack Coleman
Website: www.jackcolemanphoto.com/
Contact: 
jackcolemanphotography@gmail.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

Hi! Could you kindly introduce yourself?
Hello, my name is Marshall Foster and I was born and raised in Texas.  I currently live in Austin, and work in the music industry.
Where about’s did you grow up and how do you think it influenced you later as a photographer?
I grew up in a town just 30 minutes south of Austin, TX called San Marcos.  I believe that the places we grow up in have a great influence on us.  These places are where we begin to view and engage the world around us.  Growing up we, my twin Brother, Sister and I, all had to go to a Private Christian School for about 5 years.  Over those 5 years we learned all about the battle between good and evil and the contrast of light verses dark.  I think that lesson has always stayed with me.  Now, I’d say that I’m more spiritual than religious, but am still in awe of the contrast of light and dark, and I love to photograph crosses and other holy symbols when I can.  When I was a kid I really wanted to be an archaeologist and travel the world digging up bones and treasure.
What do you love about taking photographs?
I love photographing the fleeting moments of passion and emotion that are often too quick for the human eye to hold on to.  I always want to dig deeper into a realm where unscripted beauty lies alongside honest emotion.  This is why I enjoy shooting the world around us rather than doing photo shoots where shots are more contrived.  When people view my photos I hope they gain an emotional experience with each one.  To me, many of my photos beckon emotions such as confusion, sadness, happiness, fear or love.  I also write music, and the one thing that I love most about writing music is hearing people talk about the emotional connection they made with the song after hearing it.  I share this same idea with the photos I take.

What motivates you to keep pressing the shutter release button?
I can remember the exact moment that I fell in love with photography.  It was on July 28th, 2008., and we were in Venice Italy for work.  I asked my friend Todd Purifoy, who is a professional photographer, if I could borrow his camera to walk around with. He said yes, and kindly showed me how to basically use the camera. After my camera lesson, I then took of to explore the wondrous city. I was hooked from the first moment I looked through the viewfinder and snapped my first photo!  It was like a veil was lifted from my eyes. My mind seemed to summon beauty out from the shadows and lights. Lines and colors were overloading my senses but I couldn’t turn it off. The camera had forever changed the way I viewed the world. From then on I wanted to learn all I could about photography. I started reading books on photography, subscribing to photography magazines, and completing online tutorials on editing techniques. The more I learned, the more I experimented. In February of 2010 my grandfather gave me a couple of his old analogue cameras that he had used previously for many years.  At first, I didn’t really know what to do with them and actually thought about taking the old cameras to the camera store to see about selling them because I didn’t think I would ever use them.  (Later I would be grateful I didn’t because I still use his cameras and lenses today.)  It wasn’t till later in the month that I would fall in love with film.  One night, my friend Kathleen invited me to a photography meet up that she planned to attend.  Having gone to many photo meet ups in the past with her, I showed up with all of my digital equipment ready to walk around downtown Austin.  When I arrived, I noticed that I was the only one with a digital camera and that everyone else were holding Holgas and other film cameras.  After meeting everyone, we decided to grab a couple frosty beers and talk “photo”.  After a couple of beers and some small talk, we then began to share photos. Cameron Russell, who was the one who organized the meeting that night for the group called “Plastic Lens Lovers of Austin”, pulled a little black camera out of his pocket and set it on the table.   I asked what kind of camera it was and he said it was a Lomo LC-A+RL.  He then continued to show me a few of the photos he had taken with the camera.  My first thought when I saw his Lomo camera was “There is no way those pictures are coming out of that little black camera!” I have now taken a couple thousand pictures with the LCA, and it is usually with me at all times. The Lomo has allowed me to really branch out creatively.  Being able to shoot multiple exposures offered an infinite amount of creative choices everywhere I went.   I had become bored with shooting normal digital pictures, and didn’t really shoot until I left on vacations or did photo shoots.  There were only so many pictures of the TX Capital you could take, and someone probably has a photo just like yours somewhere else.  The Lomo camera allows me to take a TX Capital photo and then double expose it with graffiti from the side of a downtown bar…and I’m pretty sure the chances of someone else having that same photo are slim to none.  I like that most of my images I could never shoot again if I tried. It’s like Christmas every time I visit the store to pick my pictures up cause I never know what I’m really going to get.  The excitement and anticipation almost kills me sometimes…I truly enjoy it.  With photography you to stop and smell the roses, but after smelling them, you then snap a picture of them to put on your wall for others to see…and that is one of the main reasons I continue to press the shutter release.

What would your ideal trip be like?
I would really like to take my cameras to Thailand.  Ideally, I would want a guide and translator to assist me throughout my trip to be able to access the regions that only locals could really travel to.If you could invent one thing, what would it be?
I would love to be the person that invents the machine that does energy fusion.  Ha ha…just playing.  In the photography world I would love to invent the first 1.0mm to 600mm f/1.0 zoom lens that costs around $100.  One day I’m sure they will have that.
Where was the most interesting place you’ve visited with your camera in hand?
I honestly think that it would have to be Italy.  It’s where I really fell in love with photography. I feel that the next time I visit Europe I might just have to make it my home.  Everything is picturesque over there; filled with life and character.
What are you’ve favorite subjects to snap?
I don’t really have a favorite subject because I get kind of bored shooting the same subjects over and over.  However, I do love storms, and could shoot those pretty regularly. I have always had a fascination with storms since I was very young.  Storms always bring chaos and excitement with them.  In the sky, the contrasts of light and dark make them look very ominous.  When I was a kid I had a dream that there was a tornado in our backyard, and I tied myself to a garden hose so I could go out and fly around in the tornado.  It was fun in the dream but nothing I ever tried in real life…I’m sure it would be some pretty cool pictures if I tried.  What are the main influences on the kind of photographs you take?
My influences are many, but there have been a few photographers that have stood out above the rest.   My first year I consider to be my “Digital” year, and my second year I consider to be my “Film” year.  During my first year I used to search flickr and find photos that I liked and then I’d try to take a similar photo with similar editing… Just to see if I could do it.  I pretty much attended my own school of photography, which was held in my room.  It was during this time that I came across Dustin Diaz’ inspiring 365 photo project.  (http://www.flickr.com/photos/polvero/sets/72157611811908959/
During my first year I was very lucky to be able to shoot with my twin Brother Justin.  We both share a love for photography.  I also liked the work of Dave Hill and really started to travel down the strobist path.  About the same time I also started looking into HDR and the work that Trey Ratcliff has done.  At the beginning of my second year, I then met Cameron Russell and started to explore the world of film.  Switching to the world of film has been very liberating.   I went from wanting to take the perfect picture to falling in love with the perfect imperfections, scratches and dust that can show up on film.  Now, I really admire the work of Miroslav Tichý, and his philosophy, which was that it wasn’t about how good he could make a photo but rather it was about how bad he could make a photo.  He would accomplish this through his homemade cameras that were made mainly from objects he found around his home. You can see an example of one of his cameras here: (http://www.artknowledgenews.com/2009-12-08-01-35-22-international-center-of-photography-icp-to-exhibit-of-the-work-by-reclusive-artist-miroslav-tichy.html) Gerhard Richter’s ability to combine photography and painting is also inspiring. I would really like to be able to create like he does one day.What got you into Lomography cameras?
My friend Cameron Russell was the first one to introduce me to the Lomo.  He actually has a tattoo of a Lomo camera on his arm, which is pretty cool.  Cameron, myself, and our friend Jennifer Joseph are all trying to put together an art show for March of 2011.  This art show is going to be centered around Lomography.  We hope that when people leave the show they will be inspired to go out and explore lomography for themselves.

What’s your opinion on the new “Sprocket Rocket” camera?
I actually just got the “Sprocket Rocket” camera in the mail a few days ago and am in the middle of my first roll.  Now, I just need to buy a scanner and I’m set.  Can’t wait!
What was your first camera?
My first camera was a Canon Digital Rebel XSi.  It was a very user friendly camera, and is great for any first time shooters. I also recommend that all first time shooters check out Michael the Mentor’s site here http://www.michaelthementor.com/. He does a great job of explaining all the camera basics.
What was your favourite photograph?
My favorite photo is probably my photo titled “The World Is Our Playground”.
This is a photo of a BMX rider doing a wheelie on top of the ocean.  Using a splitzer on my camera I first took a picture of the bike rider when he was flying in the air, and then I walked down to the beach to take the shot of the ocean.  I had hoped that the bike rider was at least over the ocean.  When I got it developed to my surprise the bike rider’s wheel lined up perfectly with the ocean. I also like how there appears to be a pyramid at the bottom left of the photo.  I couldn’t take this photo again if I wanted to. I love getting results like this with film. See it here: (http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/4884689230/in/set-72157624297905762/)
One other photo I am very proud of is a photo called “You Are What You Eat.  It was off one of the first rolls of film I ever shot, and was my first attempt at a double exposed self-portrait.  I hand held my Nikon FE2 in one hand and a key chain light in the other.  I then took a picture of a frying pan afterwards.  I was trying to fill up a roll of film so that I could get it processed.  Doing this forced me to be creative with stuff around my house. You can see the result here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/4429480325/in/set-72157623488975299/
Name one place you would love to be right now?
I have always felt that we as Americans should do more for the people of Darfur. I want to shoot photos of the atrocities that are happening over there.  I know the two warring groups are now in a cease-fire but I think that war will eventually flare up again.  I want to take photos that evoke emotion and hopefully influence the powers that be to increase aid.  I think photographers should always give back in this way.
What are your pro’s and con’s on film vs digital?
I know that I’ve talked a lot about film and digital already so I’ll make it pretty short.  I really use the two formats to achieve different results.  Personally, when I want to be more artistic I will usually choose film.  If I were shooting a sporting or political event for a newspaper I would probably use digital for the quick turnaround.  If I were to do a photo shoot nowadays I would probably use a combination of the two.
What style of photography would you like to try that you haven’t yet?
I would really like to try Wet Plate Photography.
How many photos do you think you’ve taken since that very first time you pressed the magic button?
I think I’ve probably taken around 15,000 photos in 2 years.  When I was doing a lot of digital photography it was common to have 1000 pictures in a shoot.How do you think having a camera in your hand effects your social interactions with people/ people you’ve never met before?
I think the lomo camera makes it easier to interact with people rather than my big digital camera.  The lomo camera is less obtrusive and seems less threatening to people when I bring it out.  Kids like me to chase them around with my Super Sampler…many times I turn it into a game where I try to get them with my camera.  Photography has allowed me to meet many new faces.  During our photo walks together as a group, many people stop to talk and ask us questions about photography…which hopefully leads to more new faces on our next photo walk.  One thing we like to do is take a shot at every bar we come to when we go out on a photo walk in the city…which leads to some pretty good times!
Whats your favourite camera and why?
My favorite camera is by far my Lomo LC-A+RL because it allows me to take a variety of artistic photos, and fits comfortably in my pocket.
Do you see your work as an extension of you as a person?
I’d like to think that my photos are a good representation of my thoughts and emotions.    Name one of the weirdest experimental tools you’ve made/ brought to photograph?
I took a handful of glow sticks to a photo meet up one night.  I wanted to use them to make it look like it was raining color.  So we set up a camera on a tripod and threw them each in the air.  The results were pretty cool.  It would of made a great photo for Skittles…you know, taste the rainbow! 
Is their anything you’d like to add?
I thank you for your time, and hope my words bring a little inspiration to whomever read them.   If you would like to see more of my photos you can on my flickr account which is: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/
I should get a website put together but I think I enjoy shooting pictures more than maintaining a website…ha ha. Photography has opened my eyes to the beauty in this world…now I just need enough film to capture it all.
 
Name: Marshall FosterFlickr: www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/Contact: marshall@major7thentertainment.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Hi! Could you kindly introduce yourself?

Hello, my name is Marshall Foster and I was born and raised in Texas. I currently live in Austin, and work in the music industry.

Marshall Lomo

Where about’s did you grow up and how do you think it influenced you later as a photographer?

I grew up in a town just 30 minutes south of Austin, TX called San Marcos. I believe that the places we grow up in have a great influence on us. These places are where we begin to view and engage the world around us. Growing up we, my twin Brother, Sister and I, all had to go to a Private Christian School for about 5 years. Over those 5 years we learned all about the battle between good and evil and the contrast of light verses dark. I think that lesson has always stayed with me. Now, I’d say that I’m more spiritual than religious, but am still in awe of the contrast of light and dark, and I love to photograph crosses and other holy symbols when I can. When I was a kid I really wanted to be an archaeologist and travel the world digging up bones and treasure.

What do you love about taking photographs?

I love photographing the fleeting moments of passion and emotion that are often too quick for the human eye to hold on to. I always want to dig deeper into a realm where unscripted beauty lies alongside honest emotion. This is why I enjoy shooting the world around us rather than doing photo shoots where shots are more contrived. When people view my photos I hope they gain an emotional experience with each one. To me, many of my photos beckon emotions such as confusion, sadness, happiness, fear or love. I also write music, and the one thing that I love most about writing music is hearing people talk about the emotional connection they made with the song after hearing it. I share this same idea with the photos I take.

Marshall Lomo

What motivates you to keep pressing the shutter release button?

I can remember the exact moment that I fell in love with photography. It was on July 28th, 2008., and we were in Venice Italy for work. I asked my friend Todd Purifoy, who is a professional photographer, if I could borrow his camera to walk around with. He said yes, and kindly showed me how to basically use the camera. After my camera lesson, I then took of to explore the wondrous city. I was hooked from the first moment I looked through the viewfinder and snapped my first photo! It was like a veil was lifted from my eyes. My mind seemed to summon beauty out from the shadows and lights. Lines and colors were overloading my senses but I couldn’t turn it off. The camera had forever changed the way I viewed the world. From then on I wanted to learn all I could about photography. I started reading books on photography, subscribing to photography magazines, and completing online tutorials on editing techniques. The more I learned, the more I experimented. In February of 2010 my grandfather gave me a couple of his old analogue cameras that he had used previously for many years. At first, I didn’t really know what to do with them and actually thought about taking the old cameras to the camera store to see about selling them because I didn’t think I would ever use them. (Later I would be grateful I didn’t because I still use his cameras and lenses today.) It wasn’t till later in the month that I would fall in love with film. One night, my friend Kathleen invited me to a photography meet up that she planned to attend. Having gone to many photo meet ups in the past with her, I showed up with all of my digital equipment ready to walk around downtown Austin. When I arrived, I noticed that I was the only one with a digital camera and that everyone else were holding Holgas and other film cameras. After meeting everyone, we decided to grab a couple frosty beers and talk “photo”. After a couple of beers and some small talk, we then began to share photos. Cameron Russell, who was the one who organized the meeting that night for the group called “Plastic Lens Lovers of Austin”, pulled a little black camera out of his pocket and set it on the table. I asked what kind of camera it was and he said it was a Lomo LC-A+RL. He then continued to show me a few of the photos he had taken with the camera. My first thought when I saw his Lomo camera was “There is no way those pictures are coming out of that little black camera!” I have now taken a couple thousand pictures with the LCA, and it is usually with me at all times. The Lomo has allowed me to really branch out creatively. Being able to shoot multiple exposures offered an infinite amount of creative choices everywhere I went. I had become bored with shooting normal digital pictures, and didn’t really shoot until I left on vacations or did photo shoots. There were only so many pictures of the TX Capital you could take, and someone probably has a photo just like yours somewhere else. The Lomo camera allows me to take a TX Capital photo and then double expose it with graffiti from the side of a downtown bar…and I’m pretty sure the chances of someone else having that same photo are slim to none. I like that most of my images I could never shoot again if I tried. It’s like Christmas every time I visit the store to pick my pictures up cause I never know what I’m really going to get. The excitement and anticipation almost kills me sometimes…I truly enjoy it. With photography you to stop and smell the roses, but after smelling them, you then snap a picture of them to put on your wall for others to see…and that is one of the main reasons I continue to press the shutter release.

Marshall Lomo

What would your ideal trip be like?

I would really like to take my cameras to Thailand. Ideally, I would want a guide and translator to assist me throughout my trip to be able to access the regions that only locals could really travel to.

If you could invent one thing, what would it be?

I would love to be the person that invents the machine that does energy fusion. Ha ha…just playing. In the photography world I would love to invent the first 1.0mm to 600mm f/1.0 zoom lens that costs around $100. One day I’m sure they will have that.

Where was the most interesting place you’ve visited with your camera in hand?

I honestly think that it would have to be Italy. It’s where I really fell in love with photography. I feel that the next time I visit Europe I might just have to make it my home. Everything is picturesque over there; filled with life and character.

Marshall Lomo

What are you’ve favorite subjects to snap?

I don’t really have a favorite subject because I get kind of bored shooting the same subjects over and over. However, I do love storms, and could shoot those pretty regularly. I have always had a fascination with storms since I was very young. Storms always bring chaos and excitement with them. In the sky, the contrasts of light and dark make them look very ominous. When I was a kid I had a dream that there was a tornado in our backyard, and I tied myself to a garden hose so I could go out and fly around in the tornado. It was fun in the dream but nothing I ever tried in real life…I’m sure it would be some pretty cool pictures if I tried.

What are the main influences on the kind of photographs you take?

My influences are many, but there have been a few photographers that have stood out above the rest. My first year I consider to be my “Digital” year, and my second year I consider to be my “Film” year. During my first year I used to search flickr and find photos that I liked and then I’d try to take a similar photo with similar editing… Just to see if I could do it. I pretty much attended my own school of photography, which was held in my room. It was during this time that I came across Dustin Diaz’ inspiring 365 photo project. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/polvero/sets/72157611811908959/

During my first year I was very lucky to be able to shoot with my twin Brother Justin. We both share a love for photography. I also liked the work of Dave Hill and really started to travel down the strobist path. About the same time I also started looking into HDR and the work that Trey Ratcliff has done. At the beginning of my second year, I then met Cameron Russell and started to explore the world of film. Switching to the world of film has been very liberating. I went from wanting to take the perfect picture to falling in love with the perfect imperfections, scratches and dust that can show up on film. Now, I really admire the work of Miroslav Tichý, and his philosophy, which was that it wasn’t about how good he could make a photo but rather it was about how bad he could make a photo. He would accomplish this through his homemade cameras that were made mainly from objects he found around his home. You can see an example of one of his cameras here: (http://www.artknowledgenews.com/2009-12-08-01-35-22-international-center-of-photography-icp-to-exhibit-of-the-work-by-reclusive-artist-miroslav-tichy.html) Gerhard Richter’s ability to combine photography and painting is also inspiring. I would really like to be able to create like he does one day.

What got you into Lomography cameras?

My friend Cameron Russell was the first one to introduce me to the Lomo. He actually has a tattoo of a Lomo camera on his arm, which is pretty cool. Cameron, myself, and our friend Jennifer Joseph are all trying to put together an art show for March of 2011. This art show is going to be centered around Lomography. We hope that when people leave the show they will be inspired to go out and explore lomography for themselves.

Marshall Lomo

What’s your opinion on the new “Sprocket Rocket” camera?

I actually just got the “Sprocket Rocket” camera in the mail a few days ago and am in the middle of my first roll. Now, I just need to buy a scanner and I’m set. Can’t wait!

What was your first camera?

My first camera was a Canon Digital Rebel XSi. It was a very user friendly camera, and is great for any first time shooters. I also recommend that all first time shooters check out Michael the Mentor’s site here http://www.michaelthementor.com/. He does a great job of explaining all the camera basics.

What was your favourite photograph?

My favorite photo is probably my photo titled “The World Is Our Playground”.

This is a photo of a BMX rider doing a wheelie on top of the ocean. Using a splitzer on my camera I first took a picture of the bike rider when he was flying in the air, and then I walked down to the beach to take the shot of the ocean. I had hoped that the bike rider was at least over the ocean. When I got it developed to my surprise the bike rider’s wheel lined up perfectly with the ocean. I also like how there appears to be a pyramid at the bottom left of the photo. I couldn’t take this photo again if I wanted to. I love getting results like this with film. See it here: (http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/4884689230/in/set-72157624297905762/)

One other photo I am very proud of is a photo called “You Are What You Eat. It was off one of the first rolls of film I ever shot, and was my first attempt at a double exposed self-portrait. I hand held my Nikon FE2 in one hand and a key chain light in the other. I then took a picture of a frying pan afterwards. I was trying to fill up a roll of film so that I could get it processed. Doing this forced me to be creative with stuff around my house. You can see the result here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/4429480325/in/set-72157623488975299/

Name one place you would love to be right now?

I have always felt that we as Americans should do more for the people of Darfur. I want to shoot photos of the atrocities that are happening over there. I know the two warring groups are now in a cease-fire but I think that war will eventually flare up again. I want to take photos that evoke emotion and hopefully influence the powers that be to increase aid. I think photographers should always give back in this way.

What are your pro’s and con’s on film vs digital?

I know that I’ve talked a lot about film and digital already so I’ll make it pretty short. I really use the two formats to achieve different results. Personally, when I want to be more artistic I will usually choose film. If I were shooting a sporting or political event for a newspaper I would probably use digital for the quick turnaround. If I were to do a photo shoot nowadays I would probably use a combination of the two.

What style of photography would you like to try that you haven’t yet?

I would really like to try Wet Plate Photography.

Marshall Lomo

How many photos do you think you’ve taken since that very first time you pressed the magic button?

I think I’ve probably taken around 15,000 photos in 2 years. When I was doing a lot of digital photography it was common to have 1000 pictures in a shoot.

How do you think having a camera in your hand effects your social interactions with people/ people you’ve never met before?

I think the lomo camera makes it easier to interact with people rather than my big digital camera. The lomo camera is less obtrusive and seems less threatening to people when I bring it out. Kids like me to chase them around with my Super Sampler…many times I turn it into a game where I try to get them with my camera. Photography has allowed me to meet many new faces. During our photo walks together as a group, many people stop to talk and ask us questions about photography…which hopefully leads to more new faces on our next photo walk. One thing we like to do is take a shot at every bar we come to when we go out on a photo walk in the city…which leads to some pretty good times!

Whats your favourite camera and why?

My favorite camera is by far my Lomo LC-A+RL because it allows me to take a variety of artistic photos, and fits comfortably in my pocket.

Do you see your work as an extension of you as a person?

I’d like to think that my photos are a good representation of my thoughts and emotions.

Name one of the weirdest experimental tools you’ve made/ brought to photograph?

I took a handful of glow sticks to a photo meet up one night. I wanted to use them to make it look like it was raining color. So we set up a camera on a tripod and threw them each in the air. The results were pretty cool. It would of made a great photo for Skittles…you know, taste the rainbow! 

Is their anything you’d like to add?

I thank you for your time, and hope my words bring a little inspiration to whomever read them. If you would like to see more of my photos you can on my flickr account which is: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/

I should get a website put together but I think I enjoy shooting pictures more than maintaining a website…ha ha. Photography has opened my eyes to the beauty in this world…now I just need enough film to capture it all.

Name: Marshall Foster
Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/marshallfoster/
Contact: 
marshall@major7thentertainment.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Konnichiha, could you please introduce yourself and tell us where your from?
I came from another planet called Opticania, Its a Paradise filled with Cameras (at least I hope I was from there).
2. So the name Mijonju is acronym of your real name?
Michel Jones its my real name, people look at me and say I don’t look western. We’ll I might be adopted right?3. As a photographer what characteristics do you like about living Japan?
I am not a really a photographer, I just do it as a hobby. Living in Japan is very similar to Opticania I usually ride around with my Straida bike with a camera and shoot around the city in my free time.4. How much do you like cameras?
As much as a fat boy who loves chocolate cake.
5. Where did you learn to use a camera?
My mom was a real photographer for the local newspaper, and my dad"not a good photographer, but works at Kodak".6. What’s your favourite camera that you own?
I have a few, I’ll list them here:
Konica instant Press
Konica c35 FD / auto s3, same thing but i have both.
LC-A
7. Tell us something interesting about yourself?
Would you freak out if I had 2 tongues? I know many languages, and the reason for that is because when I was a kid I traveled a lot. And I am addicted to shutter sounds and pressing the shutter button.
8. Why did you start collecting cameras?
Because every camera has its own spirit, I can’t really explain it, I like collecting and using them. It’s not the brand of cameras but every camera itself, I used to have two Rollei 35S’ that looked identical, but their was this one that I just didn’t like and I had to sell it. The reason I started collecting them is more like an illness, anything that has a circle and a rectangle shape attracts me.9. Can you remember when you first got into photography?
Around 2-3 years ago, I got disappointed using a Canon DSLR camera and then I found how much I like using my mom’s Minolta 101B.10. Why did you start the “Mijonju Show”?
The Mijonju Show started when I was just talking about a few cameras with my friends.

11. You’ve got a lot of your photographs on the Lomography website, how do you think the Lomographic Society has helped introduce people to analogue photography?
A lot, I’m thankful to them for exposing me to more of their camera loving people. I’m extremely thankful.
12. What do you like about the Lomo style of taking photos?
I don’t really know the Lomo style, I just like the LC-A because of its flexible way of using many techniques and I love how simple it is to use. I like how detail is not the main point but instead it’s interestingness of the content.
13. I’ve seen you like going to camera shops and trade shows, what’s the most awesome camera you’ve come across?
Hasselblad with a Phraseone back - 2 masterpieces fitted together.14. Do you have any tips for shopping for cameras in Japan?
Look for shops where the prices are decided by the person who sells it instead of the shop keeper. There are some camera shops in Japan where the clients just rent out a little space for them to put their cameras there. Some clients tend to make it cheap so that the item will be sold immediately.15. You’ve been involved with the Impossible Project pretty much right from the start, how did you hear about it?
There was a site called Polapremium a few years ago where I got some of the film. I also joined Polaroid.com, I was a quiet user as I just sit and watch, but I really love what they are doing so I used my show to make a place for myself in this circle.
 16. What’s the new Polaroid film like?
Many colours and its amazing :) I can’t tell in detail, its a secret.17. You tinker/ DIY with your cameras quite often, what’s been your favourite result so far?
Well my favourite one is a Konica Instant Press with a broken bellow, but I took 5 hours to learn and made a new bellows for it. Till this very moment I still find it amazing that I made the bellow so successfully.

18. Do you ever Xpro your film/ what do you think to the effect?
Sometimes - I tried doing it once with a friend and I got poisoned I felt horrible.Anyway Xpro is pretty nice, I love the memorizing colors that it produces, some are tinted and some are nicely even. Over all I love it, but I don’t usually do it.19. You started a blog called www.circlerectangle.com, tell us a little bit about it?
It’s actually a company that I am going to create on my own, I’m also going to open a café in that name too. Now all I am doing is saving money for this amazing café to be created. Circle Rectangle is my dream café that i wish to create but I just need more savings to create.20. Have you seen the design for the “Holga D”?
Yes it’s amazing, but he said it would need a full frame sensor. I don’t think anyone would buy a full frame sensored camera with a plastic lens. It’s do able but this will only happen when full frame sensors become extremely cheap.
21. Pretend their was a sumo fight between film and digital cameras, metaphorically speaking who do you think would win and why?
I don’t think people realize this but film has more depth and dimension. The bigger the capturing medium the more depth and deepness, I think this makes the photo look more sophisticated. That’s why SX-70’ have beautiful photos with amazing depth of field, even if its through an F8 lens. Imagine how much it would cost to make a digital sensor at the size of a Polaroid film? Major digital cameras out there have small sensors, commonly 1.7” and so on… That’s why the photos come out flat and lifeless. The Canon EOS 1D Mark 3 is the camera that can be put in the sumo ring for a fight because these cameras have digital sensors the size of a 35mm film. If you had to put these 2 in a ring I’d say the fight will be long, winning or loosing depends on the person who uses it. If you like to shoot start trails and long exposures, film would surely win. If you need to shoot many photos and continuous shooting then digital wins. If you like compact full frame photos, film wins. You can put a roll of film into a Natura Black 1.9 which is the size of your palm and put it in your pocket. As for digital, you need a big camera with a full frame sensor with a nice expensive piece of glass and a fast lens to be able to do something equivalent to a Natura Black 1.9.
22. Do you ever collaborate with other photographers?
Yes I do, in fact I’d love to do it a lot more, I can’t do it often because of my work, but if im really free I’ll do it.23. You’ve met some pretty interesting people recently, name a few people who we should check out?
Check out the Impossible Project, spread the word that instant integral films are back.
You should check out:
The Impossible Project: http://www.the-impossible-project.com/
Ryu Itsuki: http://ryuitsuki.com/
TM Wong (He probably has the most Polaroid’s ever collected, he has over 1500 different Polaroid cameras): http://www.polala.hk/my-list/index.html
Artsy Ken: http://www.artsyken.com/
Brian: http://zokyo.jp/

24. What’s your favourite camera of all time?
Of all time, hmm this is really hard. I guess the Konica C35 FD in black is my favorite :)
25. Finally thanks for your time, is their anything you’d like to add?
Nope :) Thank you for the interview as well!
 
Name: Michel Jones Website: www.circlerectangle.comContact: mijonju@gmail.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Konnichiha, could you please introduce yourself and tell us where your from?

I came from another planet called Opticania, Its a Paradise filled with Cameras (at least I hope I was from there).

Mijonju

2. So the name Mijonju is acronym of your real name?

Michel Jones its my real name, people look at me and say I don’t look western. We’ll I might be adopted right?

3. As a photographer what characteristics do you like about living Japan?

I am not a really a photographer, I just do it as a hobby. Living in Japan is very similar to Opticania I usually ride around with my Straida bike with a camera and shoot around the city in my free time.

4. How much do you like cameras?

As much as a fat boy who loves chocolate cake.

Michel Jones

5. Where did you learn to use a camera?

My mom was a real photographer for the local newspaper, and my dad
"not a good photographer, but works at Kodak".

6. What’s your favourite camera that you own?

I have a few, I’ll list them here:

  • Konica instant Press
  • Konica c35 FD / auto s3, same thing but i have both.
  • LC-A

7. Tell us something interesting about yourself?

Would you freak out if I had 2 tongues? I know many languages, and the reason for that is because when I was a kid I traveled a lot. And I am addicted to shutter sounds and pressing the shutter button.

Cameras

8. Why did you start collecting cameras?

Because every camera has its own spirit, I can’t really explain it, I like collecting and using them. It’s not the brand of cameras but every camera itself, I used to have two Rollei 35S’ that looked identical, but their was this one that I just didn’t like and I had to sell it. The reason I started collecting them is more like an illness, anything that has a circle and a rectangle shape attracts me.

9. Can you remember when you first got into photography?

Around 2-3 years ago, I got disappointed using a Canon DSLR camera and then I found how much I like using my mom’s Minolta 101B.

10. Why did you start the “Mijonju Show”?

The Mijonju Show started when I was just talking about a few cameras with my friends.

Japan

11. You’ve got a lot of your photographs on the Lomography website, how do you think the Lomographic Society has helped introduce people to analogue photography?

A lot, I’m thankful to them for exposing me to more of their camera loving people. I’m extremely thankful.

12. What do you like about the Lomo style of taking photos?

I don’t really know the Lomo style, I just like the LC-A because of its flexible way of using many techniques and I love how simple it is to use. I like how detail is not the main point but instead it’s interestingness of the content.

Photo

13. I’ve seen you like going to camera shops and trade shows, what’s the most awesome camera you’ve come across?

Hasselblad with a Phraseone back - 2 masterpieces fitted together.

14. Do you have any tips for shopping for cameras in Japan?

Look for shops where the prices are decided by the person who sells it instead of the shop keeper. There are some camera shops in Japan where the clients just rent out a little space for them to put their cameras there. Some clients tend to make it cheap so that the item will be sold immediately.

15. You’ve been involved with the Impossible Project pretty much right from the start, how did you hear about it?

There was a site called Polapremium a few years ago where I got some of the film. I also joined Polaroid.com, I was a quiet user as I just sit and watch, but I really love what they are doing so I used my show to make a place for myself in this circle.

 16. What’s the new Polaroid film like?

Many colours and its amazing :) I can’t tell in detail, its a secret.

17. You tinker/ DIY with your cameras quite often, what’s been your favourite result so far?

Well my favourite one is a Konica Instant Press with a broken bellow, but I took 5 hours to learn and made a new bellows for it. Till this very moment I still find it amazing that I made the bellow so successfully.

Photo

18. Do you ever Xpro your film/ what do you think to the effect?

Sometimes - I tried doing it once with a friend and I got poisoned I felt horrible.
Anyway Xpro is pretty nice, I love the memorizing colors that it produces, some are tinted and some are nicely even. Over all I love it, but I don’t usually do it.

19. You started a blog called www.circlerectangle.com, tell us a little bit about it?

It’s actually a company that I am going to create on my own, I’m also going to open a café in that name too. Now all I am doing is saving money for this amazing café to be created. Circle Rectangle is my dream café that i wish to create but I just need more savings to create.

20. Have you seen the design for the “Holga D”?

Yes it’s amazing, but he said it would need a full frame sensor. I don’t think anyone would buy a full frame sensored camera with a plastic lens. It’s do able but this will only happen when full frame sensors become extremely cheap.

Photo

21. Pretend their was a sumo fight between film and digital cameras, metaphorically speaking who do you think would win and why?

I don’t think people realize this but film has more depth and dimension. The bigger the capturing medium the more depth and deepness, I think this makes the photo look more sophisticated. That’s why SX-70’ have beautiful photos with amazing depth of field, even if its through an F8 lens. Imagine how much it would cost to make a digital sensor at the size of a Polaroid film? Major digital cameras out there have small sensors, commonly 1.7” and so on… That’s why the photos come out flat and lifeless. The Canon EOS 1D Mark 3 is the camera that can be put in the sumo ring for a fight because these cameras have digital sensors the size of a 35mm film. If you had to put these 2 in a ring I’d say the fight will be long, winning or loosing depends on the person who uses it. If you like to shoot start trails and long exposures, film would surely win. If you need to shoot many photos and continuous shooting then digital wins. If you like compact full frame photos, film wins. You can put a roll of film into a Natura Black 1.9 which is the size of your palm and put it in your pocket. As for digital, you need a big camera with a full frame sensor with a nice expensive piece of glass and a fast lens to be able to do something equivalent to a Natura Black 1.9.

22. Do you ever collaborate with other photographers?

Yes I do, in fact I’d love to do it a lot more, I can’t do it often because of my work, but if im really free I’ll do it.

23. You’ve met some pretty interesting people recently, name a few people who we should check out?

Check out the Impossible Project, spread the word that instant integral films are back.

You should check out:

Photo

24. What’s your favourite camera of all time?

Of all time, hmm this is really hard. I guess the Konica C35 FD in black is my favorite :)

25. Finally thanks for your time, is their anything you’d like to add?

Nope :) Thank you for the interview as well!

Name: Michel Jones 
Website: www.circlerectangle.com
Contact: 
mijonju@gmail.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Dia duit, could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where abouts your from?
Hi, my name is Connor Maguire and was originally born on the Falls Road in Belfast in 1977. My family moved to Downpatrick around this time to get away from the troubles which were ongoing in Northern Ireland at this time especially in the area where I was born in Belfast.
2. How do you think Irish culture has shaped your art?
In regards to Irish culture having an effect on my art, I believe it has had a big impact especially when I was growing up and then progressing working as an artist. I always loved the Celtic designs and everything that had an element of Irish mythology. I remember going to mass when I was kid and I had more interest in the stained glass windows rather than listening to what the priest was preaching about. I was always doodling in black pen on the front of schoolbooks mucking about with different designs and ideas, this was again usually the result of boredom and just wanting to get back to drawing which was something I did everyday. I was also inspired and liked the works of Jim Fitzpatrick who is an Irish artist based in Dublin who specializes and works in the theme of Irish folklore whom I admired growing up.

3. A lot of your paintings feature strong images of the Irish landscape, is the nature of Ireland something you want to portray in your work?
Yes, I would like to portray the landscape that I am surrounded by in my work. At the moment I am living in the country where you can see the Mourne Mountains and is very rural in regards of my location. I would like to put more of a twist portraying the landscape rather than do a simple painting of a landscape. I think more traditional landscape paintings are quite boring therefore that’s why I try and put a bit more colour and exaggerate or concentrate more in particular parts of the landscape that I like.
4. What was your experience like at the University of Ulster?
To be honest I kind of hated my time at university. However this was probably halfway down to me being a bit of a home-bird at the time and it was a completely different culture shock moving away from home for the first time and living in student accommodation with 5 other strangers having to look out for yourself. I ended up just going out more and getting caught up in the whole social scene more than actually painting. I was a bit more hesitant also to take on advice and listen to tutors and wanted to do paintings the way I wanted to, so didn’t like that so much. However I’m glad I went even though I hated it. I suppose everyone needs to experience the good with the bad which in the end makes you who you are today. At least that’s what I think anyway.
5. What resources did the university have in place for young artists like yourself?
I suppose they had everything that a student needs to learn like books, computers, tutors and assistance when it was needed. Things like financial help was handy when I spent all my money on beers or a night out I would have to apply for a hardship grant again. Only got about £30 though.

6. What was your time like working in New York?
New York was brilliant. I don’t think I appreciated it though as much until I got back. I am currently working on a piece producing a limited edition lino-cut entitled “Dreams of New York”, as I would love to get back over there. I’ve just had a baby though so will be a few years yet before I can get over there for a proper stay.
7. Did you get inspired by the bright lights?
Oh yes. I remember when we left JFK airport we went straight to the subway. While traveling underground you couldn’t help but feel excited. When we made our way out of the underground the first thing I could see was the skyscrapers and the shadows of these huge buildings with the sun shining through. Walking down the sidewalk as they call it was even spectacular, the manholes on the road had steam flowing into the air and the people themselves all seemed to have a personality of their own which you could see on the outside almost like they wore them on their sleeves. This might sound a bit weird or I am not explaining this right but in comparison to the people in Belfast or Ireland the people are very reserved and worry about their image or what people might think in regards to making passive remarks. In New York it was like you could walk down the street naked and no one would blink an eyelid. It’s like the unusual was just the usual if you know what I mean. There was an element of danger and excitement at the same time like a feeling of being alive. That probably sounds really dramatic but there always something new or happening. You just had to open your eyes. If I was to live in a city then it would be New York and if not it would be in the country or near a coastline where you could kite surf everyday.
8. Did you meet and work with many fellow artists whilst in the big apple?
I visited a lot of galleries and the New York museum where I would never have seen such original paintings in the flesh like Klimt, Pollock, Picasso and so on. I was in Long Island where I visited Jackson Pollock’s house where he lived. By coincidence we met a film crew who were telling me that they just finished filming the final scenes for the film “POLLOCK" which was due out the next year (2000) featuring Ed Harris who played Jackson Pollock. I got the film and have watched it several times. I don’t know whether I have brainwashed myself into thinking this is the best film ever made or whether it is because when I watch it I remind myself that I was there. Kind of like looking at an old photograph of a time when you visited somewhere and you are looking back. Anyway I have the movie and watch it now and again so if you haven’t seen it you should check it out. There was a nice corky soundtrack to it as well.

9. You’ve done a lot of exhibitions, do you think that it’s one of the best ways to get your art our their to the public?
Yes it’s a good way and probably one of the main ways in order to get your work into the public eye as galleries don’t usually take you on unless you have a portfolio or resume showing how serious you are as an artist. I hate doing solo exhibitions though as there is a lot of work and expense that goes into it especially now in these economic times. Currently at the moment I am just taking part in group shows and exhibiting through galleries. 
10. Your work has been featured in a lot of Irish newspapers; did you get much response from people who liked your work?
Yes there is always emails and feedback coming through. Especially when you do a solo exhibition you want to get as much exposure as possible so I got a radio interview on the BBC talking about one of my exhibitions called “A Collection So Far”. This was followed up by Culture Northern Ireland and an Irish News interview. All these forms of reviews/interviews are good as a way of exposure telling people when and where an exhibition is taking place. It’s also good because people then go looking for who you are so it can work well like promoting a sale.

11. What artists do you admire?
There are so many I probably couldn’t name them. I admire anyone who can work in a technical illustrative way and at the same time someone who can work loose and produce work which is suggestive and just as visually appealing as a piece of work that is highly detailed if you know what I mean. There are the masters of course which im sure everyone has heard of like Dali, Turner, Degas, Leonardo Da Vinci and so on. Looking at the shelf here I particularly like works by Matisse, Diego Riviera, Edward Hopper, Mc Escher, Michael Sowa and Hundertwasser. It’s a bit of a mixture there with all different styles and from different eras. Im currently getting into the linocuts and woodcuts and love work by the German expressionists Erich Heckle, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and above all Kathe Kollwitz. You should check some of these artists out. There work is fantastic working in craved woodblocks and producing really strong artworks in black and white.
12. The clouds in your latest work is something that stands out for me, would you consider your work abstract at all?
I suppose I would in a way. I have been concentrating on composition and producing the latest body of work which has more of a symbolic look to it. for example if you were to ask someone to randomly draw a cloud, everyone has an idea of what a cloud looks like and so will draw something fluffy or curved and bumpy. It’s like putting all these ideas into a picture using your minds eye so to speak drawing or painting in a naïve way and at the same time trying to paint or create a kind of realism with the paint. It’s kind of hard to explain. I have an idea of what I want something to look like and I just juggle around with what fits best. I think some of the work may possibly border on abstract but I suppose it depends on how you look at something yourself.

13. Is the piece “Coming Home” inspired from the time you came back from America?
Coming Home wasn’t so much based on returning from America but mainly coincided with everyday events. In other articles I have said that coming home is what everyone loves. By getting up in the morning or going to school or whatever everybody loves coming home. I know I do anyway. The idea of the ship in the distance was coming home but the ship was guided by the swirling lighthouse which was reaching out to it showing it the direction. I enjoyed this painting as I was trying to give the lighthouse more of an organic feel and almost alive. Every one needs guidance in their life at some stage of their life no matter how little or big. I suppose this question kind of relates to the question before hand in regards to the work being abstract so kind of demonstrates how you can look at something with a symbolic meaning. Whether this sort of painting would be considered abstract again I’ll leave that with viewer; I would have thought more contemporary possibly?
14. How has the freedom of being a freelance artist aided your creativity?
Working freelance is never easy. You don’t know when your next wage is coming, there are no benefits, holidays and you have to be extremely disciplined. These are all the bad things but the more positive things are you can do and work in any direction you like. If someone doesn’t like the direction your work has taken then tough. You are working for yourself and you can stretch ideas or work in whatever medium you like as long as you are happy. However you still have to make a living so sometimes you also have to do things that you don’t like in order to make money

15. What projects are you working on at the moment?
At the moment I have been trying to get back into linocuts and woodcuts and am sketching out drawings for a New York, limited edition print in A3 size. I think I mentioned it earlier in the interview entitling it “Dreams of New York”. I am also trying to get another few larger paintings done and am wanting to produce a few more works involving figures or portraiture in oils on canvas.
16. You received a letter from Prince Charles congratulating you on your art, how did this make you feel?
This was a surprise. I was having a beer with my girlfriend in a pub and I got a phone call on my mobile asking if I wished to take part in an exhibition in Hillsborough Castle which is famously known for its peace talks with Northern Irelands politicians and one of the main spots were royalty stays when they are visiting the province. Anyway they asked if I would like to work along side the Princes Trust as it’s main representative for the exhibition. I approached them months before applying for a grant in order to purchase framing equipment which I got and that was how they were informed of the work that I did. The exhibition took place and I was forwarded a letter which was then put in all copies of the catalogue at the foreword which was shown in each book. It was a great pleasure and was very pleased at the fact that I had been asked to do this especially when I was just starting out as an artist.
17. What did it mean to you to be the youngest person to be granted membership of the Ulster Watercolour Society?
Again I was very pleased to be accepted into the UWS at such an age. I thought it was great as no one else had ever been accepted before and to win an award was even better at the first exhibition I took part in. Although it had its downfalls too; I remember looking at one of my paintings with my dad and someone coming up to me and saying your dads a great artist. I just went along with it and hoped maybe I would grow some facial hair next week to look a bit older. Still hasn’t happened. However it is great being the first youngest member and now they have started taking younger members on now every year.
18. What music do you listen to?
I listen all sorts of different music. I particularly like music with big beats that has element of ambience and is more instrumental than vocal throughout. Some of the beat stuff I would listen to would be the likes of record label Ninja Tune that represent artists like DJ Shadow who I think is amazing. Other artists like David Holmes who is from Belfast originally but is responsible for a lot of soundtracks you hear on some of the latest movie releases made in Hollywood. Other artists who fall under this genre are like Red Snapper, DJ Food, The Orb, Coldcut, Massive Attack and many others. Music with vocals perhaps would the likes of Beth Orton, Gomez, Zero 7, Florence and The Machine and a bit of jazz. I can’t stand all that chart music stuff. It’s all crap apart from one or two that slip in there but then again that’s just my opinion. Everyone’s different.

19. How did the opportunity to have your work printed and sold on greetings cards come about?
I actually started that up myself. I thought it would be a good idea to get the work into print so as I could get it into mainstream card and craft shops which again acts as a business card in a way and reaching out to the public. I did all the Photoshop work myself after getting the work scanned in by just cleaning up around the edges and am planning on purchasing a giclee printing machine later in the year hopefully. This all cuts down costs but doing these things yourself costs a lot of time which I have less and less of these days.
20. What do you like about the medium of printing?
Unlike giclee printing which is a mechanical process printing digitally takes no effort at all apart from changing the odd ink cartridge which is quite an empty and heartless process. Producing linocuts and woodcuts it’s a completely different feeling that you can’t explain. There is nothing like cutting into a block working in reverse and trying to imagine how it might look finished. By the time you have finished cutting the block its time to ink the block up and put it through the press. I find this extremely exciting with the process of placing the block on the press then laying the paper on top, then you hope to achieve a perfect print but you won’t know until you peel the paper back from the wet block. When you get a good print you feel a sense of achievement and when you get a bad print you feel like shit. It’s that personal and emotional when you are producing prints that have been carved and printed by yourself. Anyone reading this that isn’t familiar with printmaking will be going “get a life mate, how can you get so worked up about making a print”. I can only say I don’t know, I just do and I love it.
21. What motivates you to make art?
Motivation comes and goes. Some days I feel so motivated I can’t put the brushes down and others I can’t even look at one. Again I don’t know why I draw and paint. I just know that I am unhappy, frustrated and a bit lost as to what I am doing. I think I just have to be busy all the time but there are several times when I can find myself looking at a blank page just staring or loosely scribbling because I just cant get started for some reason. Sometimes when I know I have to paint something then I know I have to get started. If I don’t that image or feeling will stay with me for ages so whether it is month or years down the line I know I have to produce something in order to get rid of that. Once it’s painted that feeling, curiosity or image is gone and it feels good. Sounds a bit odd and weird but that’s the best way I can explain it.

22. Finally, thank you for taking the time to answer the questions, is their anything you would like to add?
Mmmmmmmmm I can’t really think of anything. Only thing is that im going to be painting for as long as I can. I’m pretty lucky im able to make money at it and if I wasn’t able to then I would still be doing the same thing anyway. For me painting is just a way of life. 
Name: Connor MaguireWebsite: www.connormaguire.comContact: art@connormaguire.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Dia duit, could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where abouts your from?

Hi, my name is Connor Maguire and was originally born on the Falls Road in Belfast in 1977. My family moved to Downpatrick around this time to get away from the troubles which were ongoing in Northern Ireland at this time especially in the area where I was born in Belfast.

2. How do you think Irish culture has shaped your art?

In regards to Irish culture having an effect on my art, I believe it has had a big impact especially when I was growing up and then progressing working as an artist. I always loved the Celtic designs and everything that had an element of Irish mythology. I remember going to mass when I was kid and I had more interest in the stained glass windows rather than listening to what the priest was preaching about. I was always doodling in black pen on the front of schoolbooks mucking about with different designs and ideas, this was again usually the result of boredom and just wanting to get back to drawing which was something I did everyday. I was also inspired and liked the works of Jim Fitzpatrick who is an Irish artist based in Dublin who specializes and works in the theme of Irish folklore whom I admired growing up.

Connor Maguire

3. A lot of your paintings feature strong images of the Irish landscape, is the nature of Ireland something you want to portray in your work?

Yes, I would like to portray the landscape that I am surrounded by in my work. At the moment I am living in the country where you can see the Mourne Mountains and is very rural in regards of my location. I would like to put more of a twist portraying the landscape rather than do a simple painting of a landscape. I think more traditional landscape paintings are quite boring therefore that’s why I try and put a bit more colour and exaggerate or concentrate more in particular parts of the landscape that I like.

4. What was your experience like at the University of Ulster?

To be honest I kind of hated my time at university. However this was probably halfway down to me being a bit of a home-bird at the time and it was a completely different culture shock moving away from home for the first time and living in student accommodation with 5 other strangers having to look out for yourself. I ended up just going out more and getting caught up in the whole social scene more than actually painting. I was a bit more hesitant also to take on advice and listen to tutors and wanted to do paintings the way I wanted to, so didn’t like that so much. However I’m glad I went even though I hated it. I suppose everyone needs to experience the good with the bad which in the end makes you who you are today. At least that’s what I think anyway.

5. What resources did the university have in place for young artists like yourself?

I suppose they had everything that a student needs to learn like books, computers, tutors and assistance when it was needed. Things like financial help was handy when I spent all my money on beers or a night out I would have to apply for a hardship grant again. Only got about £30 though.

Connor Maguire

6. What was your time like working in New York?

New York was brilliant. I don’t think I appreciated it though as much until I got back. I am currently working on a piece producing a limited edition lino-cut entitled “Dreams of New York”, as I would love to get back over there. I’ve just had a baby though so will be a few years yet before I can get over there for a proper stay.

7. Did you get inspired by the bright lights?

Oh yes. I remember when we left JFK airport we went straight to the subway. While traveling underground you couldn’t help but feel excited. When we made our way out of the underground the first thing I could see was the skyscrapers and the shadows of these huge buildings with the sun shining through. Walking down the sidewalk as they call it was even spectacular, the manholes on the road had steam flowing into the air and the people themselves all seemed to have a personality of their own which you could see on the outside almost like they wore them on their sleeves. This might sound a bit weird or I am not explaining this right but in comparison to the people in Belfast or Ireland the people are very reserved and worry about their image or what people might think in regards to making passive remarks. In New York it was like you could walk down the street naked and no one would blink an eyelid. It’s like the unusual was just the usual if you know what I mean. There was an element of danger and excitement at the same time like a feeling of being alive. That probably sounds really dramatic but there always something new or happening. You just had to open your eyes. If I was to live in a city then it would be New York and if not it would be in the country or near a coastline where you could kite surf everyday.

8. Did you meet and work with many fellow artists whilst in the big apple?

I visited a lot of galleries and the New York museum where I would never have seen such original paintings in the flesh like Klimt, Pollock, Picasso and so on. I was in Long Island where I visited Jackson Pollock’s house where he lived. By coincidence we met a film crew who were telling me that they just finished filming the final scenes for the film “POLLOCK" which was due out the next year (2000) featuring Ed Harris who played Jackson Pollock. I got the film and have watched it several times. I don’t know whether I have brainwashed myself into thinking this is the best film ever made or whether it is because when I watch it I remind myself that I was there. Kind of like looking at an old photograph of a time when you visited somewhere and you are looking back. Anyway I have the movie and watch it now and again so if you haven’t seen it you should check it out. There was a nice corky soundtrack to it as well.

Connor Maguire

9. You’ve done a lot of exhibitions, do you think that it’s one of the best ways to get your art our their to the public?

Yes it’s a good way and probably one of the main ways in order to get your work into the public eye as galleries don’t usually take you on unless you have a portfolio or resume showing how serious you are as an artist. I hate doing solo exhibitions though as there is a lot of work and expense that goes into it especially now in these economic times. Currently at the moment I am just taking part in group shows and exhibiting through galleries. 

10. Your work has been featured in a lot of Irish newspapers; did you get much response from people who liked your work?

Yes there is always emails and feedback coming through. Especially when you do a solo exhibition you want to get as much exposure as possible so I got a radio interview on the BBC talking about one of my exhibitions called “A Collection So Far”. This was followed up by Culture Northern Ireland and an Irish News interview. All these forms of reviews/interviews are good as a way of exposure telling people when and where an exhibition is taking place. It’s also good because people then go looking for who you are so it can work well like promoting a sale.

Connor Maguire

11. What artists do you admire?

There are so many I probably couldn’t name them. I admire anyone who can work in a technical illustrative way and at the same time someone who can work loose and produce work which is suggestive and just as visually appealing as a piece of work that is highly detailed if you know what I mean. There are the masters of course which im sure everyone has heard of like Dali, Turner, Degas, Leonardo Da Vinci and so on. Looking at the shelf here I particularly like works by Matisse, Diego Riviera, Edward Hopper, Mc EscherMichael Sowa and Hundertwasser. It’s a bit of a mixture there with all different styles and from different eras. Im currently getting into the linocuts and woodcuts and love work by the German expressionists Erich Heckle, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and above all Kathe Kollwitz. You should check some of these artists out. There work is fantastic working in craved woodblocks and producing really strong artworks in black and white.

12. The clouds in your latest work is something that stands out for me, would you consider your work abstract at all?

I suppose I would in a way. I have been concentrating on composition and producing the latest body of work which has more of a symbolic look to it. for example if you were to ask someone to randomly draw a cloud, everyone has an idea of what a cloud looks like and so will draw something fluffy or curved and bumpy. It’s like putting all these ideas into a picture using your minds eye so to speak drawing or painting in a naïve way and at the same time trying to paint or create a kind of realism with the paint. It’s kind of hard to explain. I have an idea of what I want something to look like and I just juggle around with what fits best. I think some of the work may possibly border on abstract but I suppose it depends on how you look at something yourself.

Connor Maguire

13. Is the piece “Coming Home” inspired from the time you came back from America?

Coming Home wasn’t so much based on returning from America but mainly coincided with everyday events. In other articles I have said that coming home is what everyone loves. By getting up in the morning or going to school or whatever everybody loves coming home. I know I do anyway. The idea of the ship in the distance was coming home but the ship was guided by the swirling lighthouse which was reaching out to it showing it the direction. I enjoyed this painting as I was trying to give the lighthouse more of an organic feel and almost alive. Every one needs guidance in their life at some stage of their life no matter how little or big. I suppose this question kind of relates to the question before hand in regards to the work being abstract so kind of demonstrates how you can look at something with a symbolic meaning. Whether this sort of painting would be considered abstract again I’ll leave that with viewer; I would have thought more contemporary possibly?

14. How has the freedom of being a freelance artist aided your creativity?

Working freelance is never easy. You don’t know when your next wage is coming, there are no benefits, holidays and you have to be extremely disciplined. These are all the bad things but the more positive things are you can do and work in any direction you like. If someone doesn’t like the direction your work has taken then tough. You are working for yourself and you can stretch ideas or work in whatever medium you like as long as you are happy. However you still have to make a living so sometimes you also have to do things that you don’t like in order to make money

Connor Maguire

15. What projects are you working on at the moment?

At the moment I have been trying to get back into linocuts and woodcuts and am sketching out drawings for a New York, limited edition print in A3 size. I think I mentioned it earlier in the interview entitling it “Dreams of New York”. I am also trying to get another few larger paintings done and am wanting to produce a few more works involving figures or portraiture in oils on canvas.

16. You received a letter from Prince Charles congratulating you on your art, how did this make you feel?

This was a surprise. I was having a beer with my girlfriend in a pub and I got a phone call on my mobile asking if I wished to take part in an exhibition in Hillsborough Castle which is famously known for its peace talks with Northern Irelands politicians and one of the main spots were royalty stays when they are visiting the province. Anyway they asked if I would like to work along side the Princes Trust as it’s main representative for the exhibition. I approached them months before applying for a grant in order to purchase framing equipment which I got and that was how they were informed of the work that I did. The exhibition took place and I was forwarded a letter which was then put in all copies of the catalogue at the foreword which was shown in each book. It was a great pleasure and was very pleased at the fact that I had been asked to do this especially when I was just starting out as an artist.

17. What did it mean to you to be the youngest person to be granted membership of the Ulster Watercolour Society?

Again I was very pleased to be accepted into the UWS at such an age. I thought it was great as no one else had ever been accepted before and to win an award was even better at the first exhibition I took part in. Although it had its downfalls too; I remember looking at one of my paintings with my dad and someone coming up to me and saying your dads a great artist. I just went along with it and hoped maybe I would grow some facial hair next week to look a bit older. Still hasn’t happened. However it is great being the first youngest member and now they have started taking younger members on now every year.

18. What music do you listen to?

I listen all sorts of different music. I particularly like music with big beats that has element of ambience and is more instrumental than vocal throughout. Some of the beat stuff I would listen to would be the likes of record label Ninja Tune that represent artists like DJ Shadow who I think is amazing. Other artists like David Holmes who is from Belfast originally but is responsible for a lot of soundtracks you hear on some of the latest movie releases made in Hollywood. Other artists who fall under this genre are like Red Snapper, DJ Food, The Orb, ColdcutMassive Attack and many others. Music with vocals perhaps would the likes of Beth Orton, Gomez, Zero 7Florence and The Machine and a bit of jazz. I can’t stand all that chart music stuff. It’s all crap apart from one or two that slip in there but then again that’s just my opinion. Everyone’s different.

Connor Maguire

19. How did the opportunity to have your work printed and sold on greetings cards come about?

I actually started that up myself. I thought it would be a good idea to get the work into print so as I could get it into mainstream card and craft shops which again acts as a business card in a way and reaching out to the public. I did all the Photoshop work myself after getting the work scanned in by just cleaning up around the edges and am planning on purchasing a giclee printing machine later in the year hopefully. This all cuts down costs but doing these things yourself costs a lot of time which I have less and less of these days.

20. What do you like about the medium of printing?

Unlike giclee printing which is a mechanical process printing digitally takes no effort at all apart from changing the odd ink cartridge which is quite an empty and heartless process. Producing linocuts and woodcuts it’s a completely different feeling that you can’t explain. There is nothing like cutting into a block working in reverse and trying to imagine how it might look finished. By the time you have finished cutting the block its time to ink the block up and put it through the press. I find this extremely exciting with the process of placing the block on the press then laying the paper on top, then you hope to achieve a perfect print but you won’t know until you peel the paper back from the wet block. When you get a good print you feel a sense of achievement and when you get a bad print you feel like shit. It’s that personal and emotional when you are producing prints that have been carved and printed by yourself. Anyone reading this that isn’t familiar with printmaking will be going “get a life mate, how can you get so worked up about making a print”. I can only say I don’t know, I just do and I love it.

21. What motivates you to make art?

Motivation comes and goes. Some days I feel so motivated I can’t put the brushes down and others I can’t even look at one. Again I don’t know why I draw and paint. I just know that I am unhappy, frustrated and a bit lost as to what I am doing. I think I just have to be busy all the time but there are several times when I can find myself looking at a blank page just staring or loosely scribbling because I just cant get started for some reason. Sometimes when I know I have to paint something then I know I have to get started. If I don’t that image or feeling will stay with me for ages so whether it is month or years down the line I know I have to produce something in order to get rid of that. Once it’s painted that feeling, curiosity or image is gone and it feels good. Sounds a bit odd and weird but that’s the best way I can explain it.

Connor Maguire

22. Finally, thank you for taking the time to answer the questions, is their anything you would like to add?

Mmmmmmmmm I can’t really think of anything. Only thing is that im going to be painting for as long as I can. I’m pretty lucky im able to make money at it and if I wasn’t able to then I would still be doing the same thing anyway. For me painting is just a way of life. 

Name: Connor Maguire
Website: www.connormaguire.com
Contact: art@connormaguire.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Ola! Could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where your from?
Hello! My name is Gavin Strange and I’m originally from Leicester, in the midlands but I now call Bristol home, and I wouldn’t wanna be anywhere else!
2. How did you come up with the name Jam Factory? 
Haha, well, I desperately wanted a ‘cool’ alter ego when I was first starting out, trying to do my own thing in my own time. I racked and racked my brains but couldn’t think of anything. My boss at the time suggested I register a domain name to start playing online, putting my work online so I just randomly searched for “Jam… Factory” - the domain name was available and that was that!
3. What kind of creative endeavours did you get up to whilst in Leicester? 
A bit of everything! mostly web design and graphic design but also filming & editing skate videos, learning how to paint and experiment with photography. I liked to dabble in a bit of everything, whatever I could get my hands on!




4. Where did you learn your skills as a graphic/ web designer? 
I studied Graphic Design at my local college back home in Leicester but then I joined a small design agency soon after (I didnt go to Uni) where I was taught the ways of being a Web designer. In my own time I practised photography, video editing, painting and everything in between. I just kept on learning as much as I can in my own time and that’s pretty much what I’ve been doing ever since!
5. When did you first get into making stuff? 
I’ve always doodled but have always been rubbish at making stuff with my hands. I started trying to figure out how to paint when I was about 18 and am still figuring it out now. I can’t paint in the traditional sense, I just draw monsters and creatures really, nothing special. I’m incredibly impatient and if it doesn’t start looking how I imagine, I get frustrated pretty quickly! It’s only in these last few years, living with artist Richt, that I’ve learnt alot about techniques and got a bit better.

6. How did you land the job as senior designer at Aardman?
Luck! I was freelance for 4 years, working under the alias of JamFactory. I worked in Leicester and then moved to Bristol, where I signed up to the local media network “Bristol Media”. I’m glad I did, as 4 weeks later I had an email drop in my inbox with the subject “Hello from Aardman!” - I was offered some freelance work on a project for Channel4, which lasted 6 months. Just as the project was coming to an end the position of Senior Designer came up and I got the job. That was nearly 3 years ago now and I’ve never looked back, it’s a dream job!
7. What’s an average day at Aardman like? 
Start the day with a tea. Check my schedule for what I’m doing for the day. Have a chat with the producer and then get on with it. Fire up Photoshop, illustrator & Spotify, pop my headphones on and I’m away! Stop regularly to have tea and a natter about something silly. Basically, I colour in all day long and drink lots of tea and listen to lot of music to help me do it!
8. What’s your favourite type of tea?
Clipper Organic Fair Trade tea. Not only is it good for you, its good for the earth and the packaging is beautiful!
9. What interests you in fixed gear bikes, is it the simplicity? 
Yeap, the sheer simplicity of the machine and the aesthetic. I love that there are absolutely no unnecessary parts on it, no clunky extra clips or bits or anything like that, just pure streamlined componants. I also love the freedom you have to really make it your own too, there’s an infinite number of ways you can stylise your ride and I love that!
10. What kind of stuff goes on in Bristol for the fixed gear scene?
The Bristol scene is really healthy, full of a huge variety of people of all ages, backgrounds and interests, all coming together just because they love riding. No bullshit, no cliques, just people with a common interest!

11. When did you get involved in skateboarding? 
I was a late starter with skating, I didnt start until I was about 18 which is the reason I never progressed to be any good! I still loved it though but got too attached and would get really frustrated when I couldnt learn a trick. I lost count of the number of boards I snapped because I got mad with myself! I skated until I was about 25 then got into riding my bike, which felt more rewarding and had the dual purpose of being transport (you can’t really skate up the hills of Bristol!)
12. Who is Shirley Creamhorn? 
She’s a vinyl toy of mine, a partnership with Columbian sculptor Alex Avelino who brought my sketch to life! The name actually comes from a good friend of mine back in Leicester, who I worked with when I was a wee 17 year old as a junior designer. Not sure how but my friend Andy gave me the alter ego of ‘Shirley Creamhorn’ and it’s stuck, so I decided to use that name and bring Shirley to life!
13. How did you get involved with Crazylabel? 
I just happened to send them an email! A friend online recommended I contact them, as they thought my monsters would be up their alley - so I gave it a shot and just dropped them an email, saying I love what they do and I’d love to perhaps make a toy. They got back to me the same day, said they liked my stuff and lets do it, lets make a toy. I couldnt believe it happened so quick - it was definitely right place, right time!




14. What have you enjoyed about working on Droplets?
Everything! Being involved with so many talented and creative people for the launch of the 2nd series was fantastic. I was overwhelmed by the sheer kindness of so many folk who helped me out in so many ways for the big launch, that was really humbling.
15. What are the plans for Boikzmoind? 
To get it finished!! I’m recording interviews at the moment with riders from the scene of all different backgrounds, which will provide the backbone of the film, being the narrative that takes you through. I’m hoping to get it finished by Spring/Summer next year and released online for free as well as producing a lovely digital hardcopy complete with photobook!




16. What makes Bristol a good place to take photographs? 
It’s just such a beautiful City! From the Georgian architecture to Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s Suspension Bridge and SS Great Britain, there’s all sorts of things to take photographs of and always something new to find!
17. What’s your favourite lens to shoot with? 
Hmmmm, either my 50mm f1.8 prime lens which gives a lovely short depth of field that makes everything very filmic, or my Sigma Fisheye which gives everything a distinctive look. They have their different uses though too, fisheye is great for parties and things like that, where you can get lots of people in and capture the spirit of the night whereas the 1.8 lens is a lot more ‘serious’
18. How has having your own website benefited your freelance work? 
Just simply being able to get my work out there, available for all to see. I’ve had my site online (I just checked this) for nearly 10 years now (9 years 9 months!) and its enabled me to keep up as the internet world emerged and get my stuff out there!
19. Who are some of your favourite artists? 
The list seems to change almost daily but my current favourites: McBess, Dieter Rams, Mark Ryden, Another Example, Mike Giant, Matthew Lyons, JP Vine to name but a few!




20. You’ve done talks at Apple stores, tell us how this came about? 
A good friend of mine, Jon McGovern, works at the Apple Store in Birmingham and one day he called me up and suggested I do a talk about my work. I was honoured, I’d done some small scale talks but jumped at the chance and absolutely loved it, that lead to me taking the same talk to the Leicester, Bristol and flagship London Regent Street store! I did a 2nd talk about Droplets earlier this year at the Regent Street store again and would like to continue doing them next year. Im working on my own iPad/iPhone game at the moment so I’d like to do a talk about that!
21. I bet you were really stoked to be featured in some top design magazines!?
Yeah definitely, it’s a real honour to be in magazines and I’m very grateful to the ones that have featured my work!
22. Why did you decide to create the collaborative group Xynthetic? 
Well, noone had asked me to be in their ‘crew’, so I thought I would start my own! It was me and my good friends who work I really admired and it all went from there. It’s gone quiet a bit now, because we’re all grown up and everyone’s very busy (and I let the domain name expire by accident) but I hope to kick start it again in the new year!




23. What kind of feedback did you get from the Anyforty t-shirt collaboration?
Good feedback, which was nice! I’m friends with Al (Wardle, the man behind AnyForty) because he used to be Art Editor of Computer Arts Projects magazine and I’ve worked with him quite alot over the years on various illustrations for the mag and even a cover illy too, so it was nice that he asked me to create something for the AnyForty family! We’re going to work together again next year on something new for the brand too!
24. Do you see any of your products becoming more than a hobby? 
I dont know really, I’m not sure where things like Shirley Creamhorn, Droplets and t-shirts etc could lead me. I certainly couldnt live off them alone and wouldnt want to try but you never know where things may lead. If there’s anything I’ve learnt then you never know whats around the corner and what opportunities will arise!
25. What kind of tunes are you into? 
A bit of just about everything! From Metal to Motown, Underground hip-hop to old-school dance music, full-on orchesta’s to acoustic singer songwriters, I like most stuff except everything in the charts, because that’s just all a pile of shit :)

26. What projects have you got planned for the near future? 
First, I want to complete my bike film ‘Boikzmoind’ because that’s a big project I need to focus on and really want to do it right. I’ve got alot of ideas scribbled down in my sketchbook that I’d like to bring to life and a few wee secret projects on the boil, so my 2011 will be pretty busy im sure of it :)
27. Finally thanks so much for taking the time to answer the questions! Is their anything you’d like to add? 
I’ll leave you on a fantastic quote I heard whilst watching a talk by the great comedic genius John Cleese, who simply said “We do not get ideas from our laptops”.
To play the awesome 8-bit Droplet game click, HERE.
Name: Gavin StrangeWebsite: www.jam-factory.comContact: gav@jam-factory.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Ola! Could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us where your from?

Hello! My name is Gavin Strange and I’m originally from Leicester, in the midlands but I now call Bristol home, and I wouldn’t wanna be anywhere else!

2. How did you come up with the name Jam Factory?

Haha, well, I desperately wanted a ‘cool’ alter ego when I was first starting out, trying to do my own thing in my own time. I racked and racked my brains but couldn’t think of anything. My boss at the time suggested I register a domain name to start playing online, putting my work online so I just randomly searched for “Jam… Factory” - the domain name was available and that was that!

3. What kind of creative endeavours did you get up to whilst in Leicester?

A bit of everything! mostly web design and graphic design but also filming & editing skate videos, learning how to paint and experiment with photography. I liked to dabble in a bit of everything, whatever I could get my hands on!

4. Where did you learn your skills as a graphic/ web designer?

I studied Graphic Design at my local college back home in Leicester but then I joined a small design agency soon after (I didnt go to Uni) where I was taught the ways of being a Web designer. In my own time I practised photography, video editing, painting and everything in between. I just kept on learning as much as I can in my own time and that’s pretty much what I’ve been doing ever since!

5. When did you first get into making stuff?

I’ve always doodled but have always been rubbish at making stuff with my hands. I started trying to figure out how to paint when I was about 18 and am still figuring it out now. I can’t paint in the traditional sense, I just draw monsters and creatures really, nothing special. I’m incredibly impatient and if it doesn’t start looking how I imagine, I get frustrated pretty quickly! It’s only in these last few years, living with artist Richt, that I’ve learnt alot about techniques and got a bit better.

Jam Factory

6. How did you land the job as senior designer at Aardman?

Luck! I was freelance for 4 years, working under the alias of JamFactory. I worked in Leicester and then moved to Bristol, where I signed up to the local media network “Bristol Media”. I’m glad I did, as 4 weeks later I had an email drop in my inbox with the subject “Hello from Aardman!” - I was offered some freelance work on a project for Channel4, which lasted 6 months. Just as the project was coming to an end the position of Senior Designer came up and I got the job. That was nearly 3 years ago now and I’ve never looked back, it’s a dream job!

7. What’s an average day at Aardman like? 

Start the day with a tea. Check my schedule for what I’m doing for the day. Have a chat with the producer and then get on with it. Fire up Photoshop, illustrator & Spotify, pop my headphones on and I’m away! Stop regularly to have tea and a natter about something silly. Basically, I colour in all day long and drink lots of tea and listen to lot of music to help me do it!

8. What’s your favourite type of tea?

Clipper Organic Fair Trade tea. Not only is it good for you, its good for the earth and the packaging is beautiful!

9. What interests you in fixed gear bikes, is it the simplicity?

Yeap, the sheer simplicity of the machine and the aesthetic. I love that there are absolutely no unnecessary parts on it, no clunky extra clips or bits or anything like that, just pure streamlined componants. I also love the freedom you have to really make it your own too, there’s an infinite number of ways you can stylise your ride and I love that!

10. What kind of stuff goes on in Bristol for the fixed gear scene?

The Bristol scene is really healthy, full of a huge variety of people of all ages, backgrounds and interests, all coming together just because they love riding. No bullshit, no cliques, just people with a common interest!

Jam Factory

11. When did you get involved in skateboarding?

I was a late starter with skating, I didnt start until I was about 18 which is the reason I never progressed to be any good! I still loved it though but got too attached and would get really frustrated when I couldnt learn a trick. I lost count of the number of boards I snapped because I got mad with myself! I skated until I was about 25 then got into riding my bike, which felt more rewarding and had the dual purpose of being transport (you can’t really skate up the hills of Bristol!)

12. Who is Shirley Creamhorn?

She’s a vinyl toy of mine, a partnership with Columbian sculptor Alex Avelino who brought my sketch to life! The name actually comes from a good friend of mine back in Leicester, who I worked with when I was a wee 17 year old as a junior designer. Not sure how but my friend Andy gave me the alter ego of ‘Shirley Creamhorn’ and it’s stuck, so I decided to use that name and bring Shirley to life!

13. How did you get involved with Crazylabel?

I just happened to send them an email! A friend online recommended I contact them, as they thought my monsters would be up their alley - so I gave it a shot and just dropped them an email, saying I love what they do and I’d love to perhaps make a toy. They got back to me the same day, said they liked my stuff and lets do it, lets make a toy. I couldnt believe it happened so quick - it was definitely right place, right time!

14. What have you enjoyed about working on Droplets?

Everything! Being involved with so many talented and creative people for the launch of the 2nd series was fantastic. I was overwhelmed by the sheer kindness of so many folk who helped me out in so many ways for the big launch, that was really humbling.

15. What are the plans for Boikzmoind?

To get it finished!! I’m recording interviews at the moment with riders from the scene of all different backgrounds, which will provide the backbone of the film, being the narrative that takes you through. I’m hoping to get it finished by Spring/Summer next year and released online for free as well as producing a lovely digital hardcopy complete with photobook!

16. What makes Bristol a good place to take photographs?

It’s just such a beautiful City! From the Georgian architecture to Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s Suspension Bridge and SS Great Britain, there’s all sorts of things to take photographs of and always something new to find!

17. What’s your favourite lens to shoot with?

Hmmmm, either my 50mm f1.8 prime lens which gives a lovely short depth of field that makes everything very filmic, or my Sigma Fisheye which gives everything a distinctive look. They have their different uses though too, fisheye is great for parties and things like that, where you can get lots of people in and capture the spirit of the night whereas the 1.8 lens is a lot more ‘serious’

18. How has having your own website benefited your freelance work?

Just simply being able to get my work out there, available for all to see. I’ve had my site online (I just checked this) for nearly 10 years now (9 years 9 months!) and its enabled me to keep up as the internet world emerged and get my stuff out there!

19. Who are some of your favourite artists?

The list seems to change almost daily but my current favourites: McBess, Dieter Rams, Mark Ryden, Another Example, Mike Giant, Matthew Lyons, JP Vine to name but a few!

20. You’ve done talks at Apple stores, tell us how this came about?

A good friend of mine, Jon McGovern, works at the Apple Store in Birmingham and one day he called me up and suggested I do a talk about my work. I was honoured, I’d done some small scale talks but jumped at the chance and absolutely loved it, that lead to me taking the same talk to the Leicester, Bristol and flagship London Regent Street store! I did a 2nd talk about Droplets earlier this year at the Regent Street store again and would like to continue doing them next year. Im working on my own iPad/iPhone game at the moment so I’d like to do a talk about that!

21. I bet you were really stoked to be featured in some top design magazines!?

Yeah definitely, it’s a real honour to be in magazines and I’m very grateful to the ones that have featured my work!

22. Why did you decide to create the collaborative group Xynthetic?

Well, noone had asked me to be in their ‘crew’, so I thought I would start my own! It was me and my good friends who work I really admired and it all went from there. It’s gone quiet a bit now, because we’re all grown up and everyone’s very busy (and I let the domain name expire by accident) but I hope to kick start it again in the new year!

23. What kind of feedback did you get from the Anyforty t-shirt collaboration?

Good feedback, which was nice! I’m friends with Al (Wardle, the man behind AnyForty) because he used to be Art Editor of Computer Arts Projects magazine and I’ve worked with him quite alot over the years on various illustrations for the mag and even a cover illy too, so it was nice that he asked me to create something for the AnyForty family! We’re going to work together again next year on something new for the brand too!

24. Do you see any of your products becoming more than a hobby?

I dont know really, I’m not sure where things like Shirley Creamhorn, Droplets and t-shirts etc could lead me. I certainly couldnt live off them alone and wouldnt want to try but you never know where things may lead. If there’s anything I’ve learnt then you never know whats around the corner and what opportunities will arise!

25. What kind of tunes are you into?

A bit of just about everything! From Metal to Motown, Underground hip-hop to old-school dance music, full-on orchesta’s to acoustic singer songwriters, I like most stuff except everything in the charts, because that’s just all a pile of shit :)

Jam Factory

26. What projects have you got planned for the near future?

First, I want to complete my bike film ‘Boikzmoind’ because that’s a big project I need to focus on and really want to do it right. I’ve got alot of ideas scribbled down in my sketchbook that I’d like to bring to life and a few wee secret projects on the boil, so my 2011 will be pretty busy im sure of it :)

27. Finally thanks so much for taking the time to answer the questions! Is their anything you’d like to add?

I’ll leave you on a fantastic quote I heard whilst watching a talk by the great comedic genius John Cleese, who simply said “We do not get ideas from our laptops”.

To play the awesome 8-bit Droplet game click, HERE.

Name: Gavin Strange
Website: www.jam-factory.com
Contact: 
gav@jam-factory.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Hello, could you kindly introduce yourself?
Cassy Giacci.2. Where abouts do you live?
New York city. I move around a lot so keeping it general is best, ha!
3. Why did you choose to live there?
A lot of reasons made it actually happen, but I kinda always wanted to anyway.4. When did you start painting?
Before I can remember, stopped in my teens, started again in my 20’s.5. Was art like an escape for you?
I don’t know. Not really. Sort of the opposite. It feels more of a real natural thing than a run-n’hide-to.
6. What kind of reactions do you get when you show people your artwork?
Usually positive in some way, even if it’s not their taste. Different people see different things in them too, which is cool, because I know what I made (sort of) and to see others see this instead of that is pretty interesting.7. What do you like about working through the night?
It’s like being in a meditative sort of state so everything seems to just flow. There seem to be less distractions and other things to think about doing. You’re sort of like- hey, it’s late- i could be sleeping, or out, but I’m doing this so let’s do it.8. Do you listen to music when your working?
Almost always. That or, (not as often) silence or TV.
9. What interests you in tattoos? Is their any meaning behind the ones that you have?
I’m not as interested in them as I used to be. Don’t even notice they’re there any more. I guess the feel of getting one is pretty all right. There’s some meaning behind some of them. Mostly the picture or word says it.10. When you look at your own work, what influences can you see in it?
None of them were too thought out. All of them were first drawn up by me.11. Do you think as a painter you’ve found your place in the world?
I’m not sure what my place in the world is but I know I like to paint and draw, whether it finds me a spot in the world or not. My stuff’s in it now (the world), even if it’s mostly in my apartment. So I guess it’s got a spot in the world…

12. Do you exhibit your work?
Yes, as often as possible. I’d really like to show it at shows (music) and “perform”, myself (live painting), more than anything, though.13. When your painting, does your imagination become your reality?
Imagination is always sort of reality (I think), because there’s some subconscious or known cause for it, or goal because of it.14. Have you ever thought about what you want your artwork to do, like to create a certain reaction? 
No. I might think about it after it’s started or the idea came up. 15. Do you believe in the parallel universe theory? If so, do you reckon that the worlds in your paintings and subconsciousness actually exist?
I don’t know for sure what to believe in anything.
16. How do you keep creative on a daily basis?
I try to work on something, even if it’s just for a minute, everyday.
17. Could you describe one dream that’s always stuck with you?
Me and my brother and sister had this hide-out in a closet around Christmas time which we’d go through a hole in the back of the wall of the closet that was covered by a blue blanket. It wasn’t very big but it was a hiding spot and we’d just sit in it giggling. The dream was recurring and i remember more details, but that’s it, basically, and it would have been cool to have that hide out in every home we had growing up. If i worked in 3d I’d like to make it. Maybe I will.
18. What kind of things directly inspire you to want to start a new painting or project?
It depends. Most of the time it just happens. Sometimes it’s new music. Other times it’s just seeing another person who’s motivated and inspired.
19. Finally thank you for taking the time to answer these questions! Is their anything you’d like to add?
Nope. :) Thank you!
Name: Cassy GiacciFilm: DocumentaryFacebook: Cassy Giacci
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Hello, could you kindly introduce yourself?

Cassy Giacci.

2. Where abouts do you live?

New York city. I move around a lot so keeping it general is best, ha!

Cassy Giacci

3. Why did you choose to live there?

A lot of reasons made it actually happen, but I kinda always wanted to anyway.

4. When did you start painting?

Before I can remember, stopped in my teens, started again in my 20’s.

5. Was art like an escape for you?

I don’t know. Not really. Sort of the opposite. It feels more of a real natural thing than a run-n’hide-to.

Cassy Giacci

6. What kind of reactions do you get when you show people your artwork?

Usually positive in some way, even if it’s not their taste. Different people see different things in them too, which is cool, because I know what I made (sort of) and to see others see this instead of that is pretty interesting.

7. What do you like about working through the night?

It’s like being in a meditative sort of state so everything seems to just flow. There seem to be less distractions and other things to think about doing. You’re sort of like- hey, it’s late- i could be sleeping, or out, but I’m doing this so let’s do it.

8. Do you listen to music when your working?

Almost always. That or, (not as often) silence or TV.

Cassy Giacci

9. What interests you in tattoos? Is their any meaning behind the ones that you have?

I’m not as interested in them as I used to be. Don’t even notice they’re there any more. I guess the feel of getting one is pretty all right. There’s some meaning behind some of them. Mostly the 
picture or word says it.

10. When you look at your own work, what influences can you see in it?

None of them were too thought out. All of them were first drawn up by me.

11. Do you think as a painter you’ve found your place in the world?

I’m not sure what my place in the world is but I know I like to paint and draw, whether it finds me a spot in the world or not. My stuff’s in it now (the world), even if it’s mostly in my apartment. So I guess it’s got a spot in the world…

Cassy Giacci

12. Do you exhibit your work?

Yes, as often as possible. I’d really like to show it at shows (music) and “perform”, myself (live painting), more than anything, though.

13. When your painting, does your imagination become your reality?

Imagination is always sort of reality (I think), because there’s some subconscious or known cause for it, or goal because of it.

14. Have you ever thought about what you want your artwork to do, like to create a certain reaction? 

No. I might think about it after it’s started or the idea came up.
 
15. Do you believe in the parallel universe theory? If so, do you reckon that the worlds in your paintings and subconsciousness actually exist?

I don’t know for sure what to believe in anything.

Cassy Giacci

16. How do you keep creative on a daily basis?

I try to work on something, even if it’s just for a minute, everyday.

17. Could you describe one dream that’s always stuck with you?

Me and my brother and sister had this hide-out in a closet around Christmas time which we’d go through a hole in the back of the wall of the closet that was covered by a blue blanket. It wasn’t very big but it was a hiding spot and we’d just sit in it giggling. The dream was recurring and i remember more details, but that’s it, basically, and it would have been cool to have that hide out in every home we had growing up. If i worked in 3d I’d like to make it. Maybe I will.

18. What kind of things directly inspire you to want to start a new painting or project?

It depends. Most of the time it just happens. Sometimes it’s new music. Other times it’s just seeing another person who’s motivated and inspired.

Cassy Giacci

19. Finally thank you for taking the time to answer these questions! Is their anything you’d like to add?

Nope. :) Thank you!

Name: Cassy Giacci
Film: Documentary
Facebook: Cassy Giacci

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Firstly, introduce yourself, what’s your name and where about’s are you from?
Alo, My name is jA!RU, I come from a mixed background of Ghanian and Egyptian/Lebonese.
2. What first got you into the world of art and graphic design?
Graphic design got into me as a kid, my parents put an old computer in my room that happened to have Paint Shop Pro on it. I was already into drawing comics and storyboards so once I found out you could create these rich designs on the computer I was all in. I did a couple flyers around age 16 that earned me more than I made in 2 weeks at my job! Then I pleaded with a guy to design his website that eventually won me a laptop, ipod, and a free macromedia suite PLUS mucho swagger…there was no turning back then. Initially the allure of graphic design was its ability to help me express so many poetic and abstract concepts I wrestled with. It gave me the freedom to experiment and also, if I played my cards right, I could work for myself at a young age which meant “rock star”
3. Your work is very professional looking, where did you learn your skills of the trade?
For the most part I am self-taught, learning a lot from experimenting and online design communities. After a few years doing it on my own I attended a local art school to learn how to make my images interactive and create websites, motion graphics, and other design stuff.
4. What influences your work?
So many things and nothing in particular. Life, love in its abundance or its sparsity, pain, delight, current events, phrases…the root meanings of words. Poetry. There are a range of emotions that we all toss around on a daily basis. I try to tap into them and see what comes out.

5. Where does the name “Jairu" originate from?
…life has presented me with a lot of battles, figuratively and literally… my name is a statement of faith to anything that opposes me, it means “victorious” and  “fire”.
6. Are you working on any projects at the moment?
At the moment I’m working on evolving my style for the most part, I really want to take it to the next level. I’m taking on projects that will allow me to do that, but nothing big at the moment. A lot of personal  experimental projects.
7. If you where trapped on an island what would you do to escape?
Rip off my shirt, let my long hair down and stand at the shore clutching a torch set ablaze by a star bound to its tip haha, blow into my conch shell necklace precisely at midnight  and summon a leviathan to take me to me to the deep, where there’s a legendary city of lights that I can vacation at for a while.
8. Can you tell me what interests you?
Jesus Christ, Cultures, people, all kinds, mythology, graffiti, romance and the nuances of how people relate, history, languages and root meanings, antiquity, anatomy, ancient architecture, folklore…just to name a few.
9. Does your religion inspire you to make the art that you do?
I don’t have a religion, I have a relationship with my Creator and its awe inspiring. That awe is a part of me like air and in creating art it inspires me to explore concepts that will bring hope & inspiration to observers even if they don’t agree.
10. Have you ever had an awe inspiring moment that has changed your life?
Yeah…many, August 11th 2006 I narrowly escaped a terrorist attack that planned to blow up 8 planes headed from Heathrow Airport in London to the U.S. I was in Africa and my sister and I were praying for the safety of the flight after feeling quite disturbed. That night the terrorists were captured and the attacks were stopped before leaving the next morning.
11. Is their anyone you would like to work with right now!?
Id like to work with a few designers on some collaborations, none specific at the moment but there are alot of them. Alot of good work being done today.
12. I’ve seen that you designed the website for Mr J. Medeiros (that looks awesome!). How did this come about?
I bought his first CD and loved it. The song entitled “Constance" really moved me so I wanted to invest in him as he did in me with that song. I hit him up and he agreed immediately which was awesome and after some talks with him and listening to the album, we identified a look that really mirrored the atmosphere and texture of the music. Interesting project, he is a really talented lyricist and gifted musician.

13. What kind of music does the Jairu listen too?
I listen to a lot of Holy Hip-Hop, Lecrae, Trip Lee, Conviction, Tedashii, Dwayne Tryumf. I mix it up with some Adele, Fiest, Mr. J. Medieros, some new hip-hop classical and some japanese jazz, some underground, a pinch of techno (nobody know tho so shhhh). I like some latin music, spanish guitar, merengue, bachata, salsa and some capoeira toques.
14. If you look out of your window what can you see?
I can see…so i’m thankful.
15. If given the chance, would you rather travel back in time, or go to a parallel universe?
Neither, have you seen the news!?! these are exciting times. I know im supposed to be here for this moment and that is the chance I’ve been given. One day I will be taken out of this world, out of time and will be with Him. Wherever that is, i want to go there.
16. A lot of your work is on interfacelift.com, what made you want to design wallpapers?
They are immersive… wallpapers take over peoples computers and every time they close their windows to reveal the desktop they are in my world. What an honor that someone would splash, what is essentially my expressions, all over their screen!?! Though with the new voting system its harder to get accepted so i may start posting elsewhere.

17. When can we expect more work from yourself?
hopefully early next year! keep checking with my flickr.
18. Do you experiment with any other art mediums such as paint or graffiti?
Mainly graffiti and photography….some writing.
19. And finally, where do you see yourself and your work going in the near future?
Packing up and journeying to the center of the earth!
Name: The JairuWebsite: jairu.comContact: jairu@jairu.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Firstly, introduce yourself, what’s your name and where about’s are you from?

Alo, My name is jA!RU, I come from a mixed background of Ghanian and Egyptian/Lebonese.

2. What first got you into the world of art and graphic design?

Graphic design got into me as a kid, my parents put an old computer in my room that happened to have Paint Shop Pro on it. I was already into drawing comics and storyboards so once I found out you could create these rich designs on the computer I was all in. I did a couple flyers around age 16 that earned me more than I made in 2 weeks at my job! Then I pleaded with a guy to design his website that eventually won me a laptop, ipod, and a free macromedia suite PLUS mucho swagger…there was no turning back then. Initially the allure of graphic design was its ability to help me express so many poetic and abstract concepts I wrestled with. It gave me the freedom to experiment and also, if I played my cards right, I could work for myself at a young age which meant “rock star”

3. Your work is very professional looking, where did you learn your skills of the trade?

For the most part I am self-taught, learning a lot from experimenting and online design communities. After a few years doing it on my own I attended a local art school to learn how to make my images interactive and create websites, motion graphics, and other design stuff.

4. What influences your work?

So many things and nothing in particular. Life, love in its abundance or its sparsity, pain, delight, current events, phrases…the root meanings of words. Poetry. There are a range of emotions that we all toss around on a daily basis. I try to tap into them and see what comes out.

Celeste

5. Where does the name “Jairu" originate from?

…life has presented me with a lot of battles, figuratively and literally… my name is a statement of faith to anything that opposes me, it means “victorious” and  “fire”.

6. Are you working on any projects at the moment?

At the moment I’m working on evolving my style for the most part, I really want to take it to the next level. I’m taking on projects that will allow me to do that, but nothing big at the moment. A lot of personal  experimental projects.

7. If you where trapped on an island what would you do to escape?

Rip off my shirt, let my long hair down and stand at the shore clutching a torch set ablaze by a star bound to its tip haha, blow into my conch shell necklace precisely at midnight  and summon a leviathan to take me to me to the deep, where there’s a legendary city of lights that I can vacation at for a while.

8. Can you tell me what interests you?

Jesus Christ, Cultures, people, all kinds, mythologygraffiti, romance and the nuances of how people relate, history, languages and root meanings, antiquity, anatomy, ancient architecture, folklore…just to name a few.

Play Kiss

9. Does your religion inspire you to make the art that you do?

I don’t have a religion, I have a relationship with my Creator and its awe inspiring. That awe is a part of me like air and in creating art it inspires me to explore concepts that will bring hope & inspiration to observers even if they don’t agree.

10. Have you ever had an awe inspiring moment that has changed your life?

Yeah…many, August 11th 2006 I narrowly escaped a terrorist attack that planned to blow up 8 planes headed from Heathrow Airport in London to the U.S. I was in Africa and my sister and I were praying for the safety of the flight after feeling quite disturbed. That night the terrorists were captured and the attacks were stopped before leaving the next morning.

11. Is their anyone you would like to work with right now!?

Id like to work with a few designers on some collaborations, none specific at the moment but there are alot of them. Alot of good work being done today.

12. I’ve seen that you designed the website for Mr J. Medeiros (that looks awesome!). How did this come about?

I bought his first CD and loved it. The song entitled “Constance" really moved me so I wanted to invest in him as he did in me with that song. I hit him up and he agreed immediately which was awesome and after some talks with him and listening to the album, we identified a look that really mirrored the atmosphere and texture of the music. Interesting project, he is a really talented lyricist and gifted musician.

Jairu

13. What kind of music does the Jairu listen too?

I listen to a lot of Holy Hip-Hop, Lecrae, Trip Lee, Conviction, Tedashii, Dwayne Tryumf. I mix it up with some Adele, Fiest, Mr. J. Medieros, some new hip-hop classical and some japanese jazz, some underground, a pinch of techno (nobody know tho so shhhh). I like some latin music, spanish guitar, merengue, bachata, salsa and some capoeira toques.

14. If you look out of your window what can you see?

I can see…so i’m thankful.

15. If given the chance, would you rather travel back in time, or go to a parallel universe?

Neither, have you seen the news!?! these are exciting times. I know im supposed to be here for this moment and that is the chance I’ve been given. One day I will be taken out of this world, out of time and will be with Him. Wherever that is, i want to go there.

16. A lot of your work is on interfacelift.com, what made you want to design wallpapers?

They are immersive… wallpapers take over peoples computers and every time they close their windows to reveal the desktop they are in my world. What an honor that someone would splash, what is essentially my expressions, all over their screen!?! Though with the new voting system its harder to get accepted so i may start posting elsewhere.

Jairu

17. When can we expect more work from yourself?

hopefully early next year! keep checking with my flickr.

18. Do you experiment with any other art mediums such as paint or graffiti?

Mainly graffiti and photography….some writing.

19. And finally, where do you see yourself and your work going in the near future?

Packing up and journeying to the center of the earth!

Name: The Jairu
Website: jairu.com
Contact: jairu@jairu.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

Lolli_Watch

1. Firstly, introduce yourself, what’s your name and where abouts are you from?
Hi, my name is Kosuke Masuda and my friends call me Ko. I’m from Yokohama Japan. I was born in my family’s temple and I grew up there. I am Buddhist monk.
2. How did you start your career as an artist? 
I don’t remember, but I believe everyone is an artist. I guess I started since I was born?!? When my one year old daughter held a pen and scratched on paper, lines were left. Do you called it art? I call it art. It’s just to notice that everything is art, we are in it and we are it.
3. Where did you go to learn your skills? 
I went to the Elam school of Fine Art at the Auckland University in New Zealand. I got a BFA but my skills are self taught. When I was a student I did all the kind of styles of painting, sculpture, prints and photographs that I wanted. Teachers always told me “stick with one thing”, but I did not.
4. A lot of your work is very practical, do you enjoy knowing that people can enjoy your work physically as well as visually? 
Of course, I enjoy both ways. I want  my works to be enjoyed physically as well as visually.
5. You have worked on helmets, bike parts, surfboards and office walls. What other mediums have you experimented with?
Bags, glasses and stone.
6. What artists did you admire when you were growing up? 
Too many.
7. Do you prefer to be in shoes or have nothing on your feet? 
I like bare foot. When I was in New Zealand, it’s not that strange to walk around on the streets with nothing on your feet .
8. What made you want to start customising bike parts as art?
At a time in 2006 I was engraving on clear acrylic boxes. One of them was in my friend’s bar. Coincidently my friend asked me “why don’t you engrave a handle?”, so I did. It was easy. It seemed that all I did, was just change the surface where I was projecting or expressing my vision of art .
9. What sort of reactions do you get when people see your work for the first time?
One interesting reaction was from a girl, she said “masculine”. Most people ask me “how”.
(Photograph by Yohei Mortia)
10. In November 2009 you exhibited at the Bridgestone Cycle art exhibition what happened? 
It went well. I didn’t have much time to make work (about a week) but I don’t take that much time to make my works anyway so it was OK. I painted on 2 new BS bike’s, 2 paintings and showed 3 other paintings and 2 screen prints. I also showed all of my bike parts.
11. In 2004 you trained as a Shingon Buddhist at the top of a mountain. What did you learn from this experience and how has it effected your art? 
Training is only for yourself. I learned so many things and I guess it changed my life, and at the same time, I understand this life that we were given. Everyone has something to do in this life. I learned visible and invisible. I learned of the nature of life.
12. Is any of your work out on exhibition at the moment? 
Not at the moment, but when the right time comes, it’s on.
13. What was it like working in a studio apartment, whilst at Auckland University with Marc Blake? Was this a creative time for you both? 
Yes, it was my best creative time of my life. It felt like freedom of mind. Everyday was creative. One day, we got a yellow pages and randomly picked out a person and a few art galleries to send a letter to. The card said something like “we are poor. please help us.”. I would draw the back side of a monkey with a red ass and a banana. Of course, no reply. Anyway, we always stimulate each others art. He is in Australia now so we email often.
14. Have you done any collaborations recently? 
Not since Bridgestone. I am planning a collaboration with my wife, she is a photographer and an artist.
15. You have painted a surfboards (very beautifully). What made you want to use a surfboard as a canvas? 
A few questions back you said “physically as well as visually”, that’s quite important. I rarely do surf but I like the surfboard itself, it’s same as bike parts. A form of beauty. I like it. Stretched canvas is nice, but surfboards are more yummy and smooth.
16. Does the seas energy and presence have a place in your heart? 
Yes.
(Portrait of Kosuke Masuda by Marc Blake)
17. If you could be reincarnated as any living thing, what would you be/ why? 
I wish I could be reincarnated as a non living that is Enlightenment. But I guess I would have to be reincarnated as a human again to do more things in this life. The thing is it’s not for myself it’s for others.
18. Do you have any advice for artists who want to live off their art? 
Live off their art… I want to advise that the important thing is “live with their art”. It doesn’t need a goal as a result. But whatever you do in this life is part of art, life is art and art is life. Once you notice that and believe that you can live with art. Not live off it.
19. And finally, what are your main focuses for the near future? 
Right now, I’ve got a cute one year old daughter. This is my best creation of this life and I want to focus on her mainly. Then I will know the new focuses coming for the future.
Name: Kosuke MasudaWebsite: ko5.jpContact: ko5@heteml.jp
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Firstly, introduce yourself, what’s your name and where abouts are you from?

Hi, my name is Kosuke Masuda and my friends call me Ko. I’m from Yokohama Japan. I was born in my family’s temple and I grew up there. I am Buddhist monk.

2. How did you start your career as an artist?

I don’t remember, but I believe everyone is an artist. I guess I started since I was born?!? When my one year old daughter held a pen and scratched on paper, lines were left. Do you called it art? I call it art. It’s just to notice that everything is art, we are in it and we are it.

3. Where did you go to learn your skills?

I went to the Elam school of Fine Art at the Auckland University in New Zealand. I got a BFA but my skills are self taught. When I was a student I did all the kind of styles of painting, sculpture, prints and photographs that I wanted. Teachers always told me “stick with one thing”, but I did not.

4. A lot of your work is very practical, do you enjoy knowing that people can enjoy your work physically as well as visually?

Of course, I enjoy both ways. I want my works to be enjoyed physically as well as visually.

5. You have worked on helmets, bike parts, surfboards and office walls. What other mediums have you experimented with?

Bags, glasses and stone.

6. What artists did you admire when you were growing up?

Too many.

7. Do you prefer to be in shoes or have nothing on your feet?

I like bare foot. When I was in New Zealand, it’s not that strange to walk around on the streets with nothing on your feet .

8. What made you want to start customising bike parts as art?

At a time in 2006 I was engraving on clear acrylic boxes. One of them was in my friend’s bar. Coincidently my friend asked me “why don’t you engrave a handle?”, so I did. It was easy. It seemed that all I did, was just change the surface where I was projecting or expressing my vision of art .

9. What sort of reactions do you get when people see your work for the first time?

One interesting reaction was from a girl, she said “masculine”. Most people ask me “how”.

(Photograph by Yohei Mortia)

10. In November 2009 you exhibited at the Bridgestone Cycle art exhibition what happened?

It went well. I didn’t have much time to make work (about a week) but I don’t take that much time to make my works anyway so it was OK. I painted on 2 new BS bike’s, 2 paintings and showed 3 other paintings and 2 screen prints. I also showed all of my bike parts.

11. In 2004 you trained as a Shingon Buddhist at the top of a mountain. What did you learn from this experience and how has it effected your art?

Training is only for yourself. I learned so many things and I guess it changed my life, and at the same time, I understand this life that we were given. Everyone has something to do in this life. I learned visible and invisible. I learned of the nature of life.

12. Is any of your work out on exhibition at the moment?

Not at the moment, but when the right time comes, it’s on.

13. What was it like working in a studio apartment, whilst at Auckland University with Marc Blake? Was this a creative time for you both?

Yes, it was my best creative time of my life. It felt like freedom of mind. Everyday was creative. One day, we got a yellow pages and randomly picked out a person and a few art galleries to send a letter to. The card said something like “we are poor. please help us.”. I would draw the back side of a monkey with a red ass and a banana. Of course, no reply. Anyway, we always stimulate each others art. He is in Australia now so we email often.

14. Have you done any collaborations recently?

Not since Bridgestone. I am planning a collaboration with my wife, she is a photographer and an artist.

15. You have painted a surfboards (very beautifully). What made you want to use a surfboard as a canvas?

A few questions back you said “physically as well as visually”, that’s quite important. I rarely do surf but I like the surfboard itself, it’s same as bike parts. A form of beauty. I like it. Stretched canvas is nice, but surfboards are more yummy and smooth.

16. Does the seas energy and presence have a place in your heart?

Yes.

(Portrait of Kosuke Masuda by Marc Blake)

17. If you could be reincarnated as any living thing, what would you be/ why?

I wish I could be reincarnated as a non living that is Enlightenment. But I guess I would have to be reincarnated as a human again to do more things in this life. The thing is it’s not for myself it’s for others.

18. Do you have any advice for artists who want to live off their art?

Live off their art… I want to advise that the important thing is “live with their art”. It doesn’t need a goal as a result. But whatever you do in this life is part of art, life is art and art is life. Once you notice that and believe that you can live with art. Not live off it.

19. And finally, what are your main focuses for the near future?

Right now, I’ve got a cute one year old daughter. This is my best creation of this life and I want to focus on her mainly. Then I will know the new focuses coming for the future.

Name: Kosuke Masuda
Website: ko5.jp
Contact: ko5@heteml.jp

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

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1. Could you kindly introduce yourself, what’s your name and where about’s are you living right now!?
My name is Anastasia Van Wingerden, but friends and family mostly call me “Stas” for short.  For most of the year I live in San Francisco, but for the next two months I’m in Carpinteria, California.
2. Why did you start making music?
My love for music started as a young girl.  I sat on the piano bench at home, my short legs swinging and my little fingers experimenting with sounds.  I can give a lot of credit to my elementary and middle schools for encouraging growth and creativity through music.  With any instrument I have played or any songs I have sung, I always find that melodies bring people together and communicate incredible spiritual energy.
3. What’s the inspiration behind your songs?
A lot of my inspiration is spontaneous and oftentimes a flow of consciousness. Reflections of nature, love, death, new life, people, silly moments, and letting go.  Sometimes I have written for certain occasions such as my high school graduation, or the memorial service for my grandmother (the song titled “Maria’s light”).  It’s best for me not to think too hard when I write music… I find that my favorite songs are the ones I write in one sitting and with no particular expectations.




4. I first heard your song “Baby it’s Cold Outside” in a video on Korduroy. What’s your involvement in the surfing scene where you live?
I try to take part in surfing wherever I live.  While I’m going to school in San Francisco, I weasel onto the bus with my board and try to brave Ocean Beach’s cold water and powerful waves.  When I return home to Carpinteria I play at some of the fun little breaks with friends and family, and while visiting my boyfriend’s stomping grounds in Encinitas I appreciate surrounding myself with creative surfers riding interesting surf craft.
5. You also have another song on Korduroy, “Christmas Kookies”. How did you get involved with the Korduroy project?
I am so fortunate to be a part of Korduroy through my boyfriend, Cyrus Sutton, the founder and creator of the site.  I love how it’s a collaboration of artistic minds finding ways to be resourceful in the waves and on land.  Cy and the other video editors are open to a variety of music, and I was happy to create some tunes for some of the clips as well as the film, “Tom’s Creation Plantation.”  It was a treat singing the duet “Baby It’s Cold Outside” with Cyrus and sharing our interests and skills together.
6. Are you working on any other projects with anyone at the moment?
Being a twenty-year-old full time student hasn’t allowed for too many side projects, but I know I will keep the ball rolling with some awesome opportunities in the future.

7. On your myspace you say you are a country girl and a city girl, what are the perks with being both a rural and urban chic?
Being home on my family’s avocado ranch near the mountains and the ocean keeps me rejuvenated, and I am beyond grateful for the foundation it has given me.  I have such an appreciation for natural cultivation when I come home from the city setting.  But San Francisco offers a lifestyle of diversity, color, cultural stimulation, and exposure to a world much larger.
8. If you had to choose, would you rather take an otter or a raccoon for a walk?
Definitely an otter… Because I would have to take him for a swim!
9. What do you like to spend most of your time doing aside from music?
I love getting a little taste of everything… Breathing fresh air through surfing, running, biking, hiking, swimming, and yoga. Keeps me clear and content.  I love cooking and crafting with friends and family, and finding interesting cultural events.  A huge fan of the crazy festivals in San Francisco!
10. You say your a farmers market enthusiast, what makes you get all exited about going to a farmers market?
While I live in Carpinteria I sell help my family’s business by selling our avocados and flowers at the Santa Barbara farmer’s market.  There is something so special about the energy there and the abundance of health and families.  I sought out the one in San Francisco and work at the Ferry Building selling potatoes on Saturdays! Can’t get enough of the delicious food and nurturing community.




11. When you day dream, what are you thinking about 99.9% of the time?
My current daydreams are mostly about an upcoming trip to Chile.  I’ll be living and studying in Valparaiso for five months this year and my mind is swirling with images and anticipation.
12. Who are your favourite musicians?
I have many… but to name a few: Mason Jennings, Xavier Rudd, The Weepies, Jack Johnson, Fleetwood Mac, Billie Holiday, Feist, and Gillian Welsh.
13. Have you made anything with your hands lately?
I just knitted my older brother a green, alpaca beanie.
14. What kind of music are you listening to at the moment?
It’s always a mish mash, but there seems to be a lot of world music in my itunes library… Since I’m studying Spanish, it’s fun to sing along to upbeat Latin songs. I love seeing how cultures can cross over through rhythms, styles, and sounds.
15. Name 3 things you can see right in front of you?
A bowl of persimmons, an unpacked bag from a trip to Guatemala, and some clear looking skies out the window.
16. Do you have any live shows arranged soon?
I’ll be playing open mics and in a few restaurants around Santa Barbara and Carpinteria these next two months.  There is a fun music lounge/restaurant called “Live Culture” where I plan on singing soon.

17. Your a student and an athlete, is their a link their?
No real link… Just keeping my mind and body sane between the studies!
18. Can we expect more songs from you in the not to distant future?
In fact, I recorded a new song called “Satisfied” today.  My friend John Allen accompanied me on his mandolin.  I’ll try to keep them coming.
19. Finally, what do you see yourself doing in 10 minutes!?
Shutting down my computer, and shutting my eyes for a cat nap!
Name: Anastasia Van WingerdenWebsite: www.myspace.com/stasvwContact: stasvw89@hotmail.com
Interviewer: Aaron KeoghFlickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

1. Could you kindly introduce yourself, what’s your name and where about’s are you living right now!?

My name is Anastasia Van Wingerden, but friends and family mostly call me “Stas” for short.  For most of the year I live in San Francisco, but for the next two months I’m in Carpinteria, California.

2. Why did you start making music?

My love for music started as a young girl.  I sat on the piano bench at home, my short legs swinging and my little fingers experimenting with sounds.  I can give a lot of credit to my elementary and middle schools for encouraging growth and creativity through music.  With any instrument I have played or any songs I have sung, I always find that melodies bring people together and communicate incredible spiritual energy.

3. What’s the inspiration behind your songs?

A lot of my inspiration is spontaneous and oftentimes a flow of consciousness. Reflections of nature, love, death, new life, people, silly moments, and letting go.  Sometimes I have written for certain occasions such as my high school graduation, or the memorial service for my grandmother (the song titled “Maria’s light”).  It’s best for me not to think too hard when I write music… I find that my favorite songs are the ones I write in one sitting and with no particular expectations.

4. I first heard your song “Baby it’s Cold Outside” in a video on Korduroy. What’s your involvement in the surfing scene where you live?

I try to take part in surfing wherever I live.  While I’m going to school in San Francisco, I weasel onto the bus with my board and try to brave Ocean Beach’s cold water and powerful waves.  When I return home to Carpinteria I play at some of the fun little breaks with friends and family, and while visiting my boyfriend’s stomping grounds in Encinitas I appreciate surrounding myself with creative surfers riding interesting surf craft.

5. You also have another song on Korduroy, “Christmas Kookies”. How did you get involved with the Korduroy project?

I am so fortunate to be a part of Korduroy through my boyfriend, Cyrus Sutton, the founder and creator of the site.  I love how it’s a collaboration of artistic minds finding ways to be resourceful in the waves and on land.  Cy and the other video editors are open to a variety of music, and I was happy to create some tunes for some of the clips as well as the film, “Tom’s Creation Plantation.”  It was a treat singing the duet “Baby It’s Cold Outside” with Cyrus and sharing our interests and skills together.

6. Are you working on any other projects with anyone at the moment?

Being a twenty-year-old full time student hasn’t allowed for too many side projects, but I know I will keep the ball rolling with some awesome opportunities in the future.

Anastasia

7. On your myspace you say you are a country girl and a city girl, what are the perks with being both a rural and urban chic?

Being home on my family’s avocado ranch near the mountains and the ocean keeps me rejuvenated, and I am beyond grateful for the foundation it has given me.  I have such an appreciation for natural cultivation when I come home from the city setting.  But San Francisco offers a lifestyle of diversity, color, cultural stimulation, and exposure to a world much larger.

8. If you had to choose, would you rather take an otter or a raccoon for a walk?

Definitely an otter… Because I would have to take him for a swim!

9. What do you like to spend most of your time doing aside from music?

I love getting a little taste of everything… Breathing fresh air through surfing, running, biking, hiking, swimming, and yoga. Keeps me clear and content.  I love cooking and crafting with friends and family, and finding interesting cultural events.  A huge fan of the crazy festivals in San Francisco!

10. You say your a farmers market enthusiast, what makes you get all exited about going to a farmers market?

While I live in Carpinteria I sell help my family’s business by selling our avocados and flowers at the Santa Barbara farmer’s market.  There is something so special about the energy there and the abundance of health and families.  I sought out the one in San Francisco and work at the Ferry Building selling potatoes on Saturdays! Can’t get enough of the delicious food and nurturing community.

11. When you day dream, what are you thinking about 99.9% of the time?

My current daydreams are mostly about an upcoming trip to Chile.  I’ll be living and studying in Valparaiso for five months this year and my mind is swirling with images and anticipation.

12. Who are your favourite musicians?

I have many… but to name a few: Mason Jennings, Xavier Rudd, The Weepies, Jack Johnson, Fleetwood Mac, Billie Holiday, Feist, and Gillian Welsh.

13. Have you made anything with your hands lately?

I just knitted my older brother a green, alpaca beanie.

14. What kind of music are you listening to at the moment?

It’s always a mish mash, but there seems to be a lot of world music in my itunes library… Since I’m studying Spanish, it’s fun to sing along to upbeat Latin songs. I love seeing how cultures can cross over through rhythms, styles, and sounds.

15. Name 3 things you can see right in front of you?

A bowl of persimmons, an unpacked bag from a trip to Guatemala, and some clear looking skies out the window.

16. Do you have any live shows arranged soon?

I’ll be playing open mics and in a few restaurants around Santa Barbara and Carpinteria these next two months.  There is a fun music lounge/restaurant called “Live Culture” where I plan on singing soon.

Anastasia

17. Your a student and an athlete, is their a link their?

No real link… Just keeping my mind and body sane between the studies!

18. Can we expect more songs from you in the not to distant future?

In fact, I recorded a new song called “Satisfied” today.  My friend John Allen accompanied me on his mandolin.  I’ll try to keep them coming.

19. Finally, what do you see yourself doing in 10 minutes!?

Shutting down my computer, and shutting my eyes for a cat nap!

Name: Anastasia Van Wingerden
Website: www.myspace.com/stasvw
Contact: stasvw89@hotmail.com

Interviewer: Aaron Keogh
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36062242@N02/

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Inspiring interviews with inspirational artists.

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